Current Students
Faculty and Staff
Business
Community
Parents

Future Students

ARNOLD CAMPUS (continued)

Student Services Center

LILA R. SCHWARTZ CLASSROOM BUILDING

13,952 gross square feet
This two-story building constructed in 1990 is identical to the Mathematics Building. It houses general classrooms, computer labs and office space and is named for Dr. Lila R. Schwartz, an optometrist who served on the AACC Board of Trustees for 20 years (1970-1990) and was awarded board emerita status. She also served on the AACC Foundation Inc. board of directors.

STUDENT SERVICES CENTER

23,662 gross square feet
Built in 2002, this two-story steel frame building boasts modern architectural features including a two-story atrium and a covered pedestrian bridge from the second floor connecting to the Student Union Building. The Student Services Center houses counseling and academic advising, admissions, registration, the registrar’s office, financial aid, campus information and visitors’ services, a career resource center and the cashier’s office.

STUDENT UNION

44,600 gross square feet
This heavily used two-story building erected in 1975 was renovated in 2002. It contains the AACC Bookstore, the Union Deli and Market dining hall, Health Services, the Student Life and Student Association offices and the Testing Center. The building is connected to the Pascal Center for Performing Arts and accessible to the Student Services Center by a covered pedestrian bridge.

ANDREW G. TRUXAL LIBRARY

43,780 gross square feet
This three-story building is one of the original four campus buildings. A 1986 partial
renovation took care of asbestos abatement. The undergoing renovation and 31,330 gross square foot addition will completely upgrade the building’s technology. The library houses a reception area, classrooms, offices, circulation and reference areas, the Student Achievement and Success program, Technology Learning Center and the Tutoring Center. The library is named for AACC President Andrew G. Truxal, Ph.D., 1961-1968, who oversaw the college’s development in the early years as a “Dartmouth on the Severn.” Read more

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