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Below are the minutes from the 2020-2021 board of trustees public sessions.

Sept. 8, 2020, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Kathleen Johnson; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting is being recorded pursuant to state law. Ms. Moore asked Executive Assistant to the Board of Trustees Tracie Thomas to do a roll call for approval of the meeting agenda. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Sept. 8, 2020, Board of Trustees public session agenda.

II. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

A. Recognition of Outgoing Board of Trustee Walter J. Hall – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore recognized Mr. Hall for 36 years of service as a trustee. Mr. Hall chaired the board for three terms and served on the Audit and Finance and Budget Committees. Mr. Hall was instrumental in expanding the college’s nursing, paramedics and police programs by working closely with county delegates to obtain funding. Additionally, he worked with Senator Jack Cade on the Cade Formula for community colleges. Mr. Hall was also instrumental in obtaining a 99 year subordinated ground lease at favorable rent on a parcel large enough for the Arundel Mills building and parking with the right to assign it to the AACC Foundation. Mr. Hall retired from the board in July 2020. A plaque will be delivered to Mr. Hall’s residence for his outstanding leadership and contributions. Mr. Hall thanked the board for the recognition, and appreciated former County Executive O. James "Jim" Lighthizer calling him to serve on the board in 1984, and Senator Philip Jimeno’s insistence to keep him on the board for twenty years. Mr. Hall stated throughout the years, he found great satisfaction helping the college achieve its mission. He was pleased to share the growth of the college from a small campus to being nationally recognized as an outstanding community college. He was proud to be part of a college that repeatedly receives unqualified reports from auditors on financial statements and zero recommendations for operations during re-accreditation. He stated the college has been blessed with outstanding faculty and staff and superstars in the educational and college administration fields. He stated it has been an honor to serve with trustees on the board. He was inspired by their desire to assist the college achieve its mission and goals.

B. Introduction of New Board of Trustees Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore introduced Brigadier General Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez as a new trustee, effective July 1, 2020. A native of Canovanos, Puerto Rico, Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez began her military career as a Private First Class with the Military Policy Corps at Ft. McClellan, Alabama. Through sacrifices and hard work, she worked her way up the ranks to Brigadier General and has served the army for 33 years. Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez holds a doctorate in philosophy and masters in strategic students, business administration, and business marketing. She is director of Army Reserve Engagement Cell (AREC) & Deputy 2 Commanding General United States Army South at Ft. Meade. She is also adjunct professor at the US Army War College and Strayer University. Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez is a motivational speaker whose passion is teaching, community service, and giving back to the community, Latinos, veterans and minorities.

C. Introduction of New Board of Trustee Kathleen Johnson – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore introduced Kathleen Johnson as a new trustee. Ms. Johnson will complete the term of retired trustee Mr. Hall. For 37 years, Ms. Johnson has developed entrepreneurial flare in the beauty industry. As owner-operator of Esther’s Hair Salon in Glen Burnie, Ms. Johnson has built a prosperous business of female and male clientele from the ground up and developed best business practices for client retention and salon management. She is a licensed cosmetologist for the State of Maryland for Spring Grove Hospital where she enhances the personal appearance of patients while educating residents on the importance of good hygiene and grooming practices. Ms. Johnson also served as president of the Freetown Community Association where she worked with politicians in an effort to improve parks and area roads in the area.

D. Introduction of New Student Board Member Briana “Bri” Barone – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore introduced Ms. Barone as the new student member of the board, effective July 1, 2020. Ms. Barone holds associate degrees in Communication and Elementary Education and has returned to AACC to pursue her third and final degree in Secondary Education in English. Ms. Barone formerly served at AACC in the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society, Student Government Association, Ambassador Campus Team, and the Educational Policies and Curriculum Committee, and is currently the 2020-2021 Middle States Regional President for Phi Theta Kappa and Lead Coordinator of the Ambassador Campus Team. Ms. Barone enjoys creative writing, music composition, art, and community service.

III. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Minutes of the June 9, 2020, Board of Trustees Meeting

Ms. Moore asked the board if any objected to the minutes from the June 9, 2020, board public session. There were no objections. As such, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the minutes of the June 9, 2020, Board of Trustees public session.

CHANGE IN THE ORDER OF THE AGENDA

A motion was made by Mr. Klasmeier, and seconded by Mr. Ulvila to change the order of the agenda by bringing the first action item in the President’s Report, V.B.1, Approval of 2020-2021 Full-time Faculty Appointments, forward on the agenda to give the new faculty the opportunity to be introduced early in the public session. Ms. Moore obtained a verbal vote of trustees who unanimously approved the change in order. Dr. Gavin introduced three new faculty Jamie Van Allen, Tanesha Meade, and Christopher Harmon. He asked the board to approve the tenure track and term appointments for full-time faculty as presented in the main motion. With approval of these appointments, instructional staffing for the Truxal Library and schools in the academic area will be sufficient for the efficient delivery of their academic programs. Approval is requested for 57 one-year and 21 two-year full-time faculty contracts. Three of the one-year term appointments are newly hired retirees or filling recently vacated positions. Additionally, approval for 14 continuing tenure track, one-year appointments is requested. 3 By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the 2020-2021 Full-Time Faculty appointments as presented in Exhibit 1 in the supporting materials to the agenda.

IV. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Audit and Finance Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

Dr. Johnson reported the Board Audit and Finance Committee met via Zoom on August 19, 2020. During the meeting, the auditor presented an overview of the planned FY 2020 audit, scope of services and deliverables, and the audit plan and timing. The committee also reviewed and discussed its roles and responsibilities as set forth in the Committee Charter. The college staff provided updates on the implementation timeline for Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), statement number 84 covering Fiduciary Activity, and GASB statement number 87 covering Leases. The committee also discussed the FY2020 operating budget status report as of August 17, 2020. The anticipated annual results project a balanced budget with the college operating within existing resources. Lastly, the committee received an update on the status of the Other Post-Employment Benefits Trust. It was noted that the county will be making a $2.7 million contribution to the trust on behalf of the college in FY2021. This is the first county-funded contribution to the trust and a major step forward in implementing a reoccurring funding strategy to address this liability going forward. The committee will meet on October 20 when the results of the audit and draft financial statements will be reviewed.

B. Board Development Committee – Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Committee Chair – No report

There was no report from the Development Committee.

C. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Vice Chair Paula A. Darrah, Board Representative and Committee Chair

Ms. Darrah reported the committee met on August 26 to continue its review of all board policies, making recommendations for revisions, adding new policies, and removing outdated policies or policies no longer needed via the board policy manual. There are two board policies the committee is recommending for removal: Students Rights and Responsibilities, and the Policy and Procedures for the Management of Disruptive Behavior of Students (Agenda Items IV.C.1 and C.2). Ms. Darrah advised both policies are outdated. The Students Rights and Responsibilities, approved by the board on March 16, 1983, mentions rights for students that are legal rights. The Policy and Procedures for the Management of Disruptive Behavior of Students, approved by the board on April 11, 1995, duplicates what is in the board-approved Student Conduct Policy and Procedures in the Student Code of Conduct at the college-level. Because both policies are board approved, the committee is recommending the board approve the deletion and removal of them from the board policy manual. Ms. Darrah stated the committee is also recommending two board-approved policies be updated: the Waivers to Tuition and Fees Policy and the Investment Policy (Agenda Item IV.C.3 and C.4). The Waiver to Tuition and Fees Policy was last revised September 16, 2016. She explained the language in the policy should be updated to reflect the current name of act pertaining to qualified unaccompanied homeless youth and the new state provision for the parent of deaf or hard of hearing child. The committee also recommends updating the Investment Policy, adopted on October 10, 1995, by removing the procedures. The policy itself aligns with state law, which authorizes the types of investments the college can make. Ms. Darrah advised that the four policies will be brought back to the full board for approval at the October 13 public session. Dr. Johnson noted an error in the language of Agenda Items IV.C.1. He stated the motion should indicate the board approves the deletion and removal of the Student Rights and Responsibilities, not the Writing Policy as indicated in the text. 4

D. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

Dr. Johnson reported the committee met via Zoom on June 18 to discuss the Riverhawk Recovery Plan, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, the Administrative Services Review project, and the FY 2020 and FY 2021 budgets. The Riverhawk Recovery Plan is a plan that lays out a structure for the college to gradually and responsibly return to normal operations with phased and gradual re-opening of the physical campus. The committee received an update that the Riverhawk Recovery Team structure includes nine teams focused on key activities necessary to successfully plan for and implement a reopening of the physical campus. Regarding the CARES Act, the committee was advised that to date the college had identified approximately $1.5 million in items eligible for support under this grant program, and that the funding had recently become available in the federal system. The committee was also advised that the Administrative Services Review project continues and is on track for a presentation at its September meeting. Lastly, the committee received updates for the FY2020 and FY2021 budgets. For the FY2020 budget, the committee received updated projections for both the operating budget and the anticipated impact on the tuition stabilization fund. For the FY2021 budget, the administration noted the college successfully obtained county administration and county council’s support for the restoration of two priority requests: funding for one-time compensation increase of $1,500 for benefit-eligible faculty and staff; and the restoration of the $1.7 million in IT capital funding.

E. Facilities Committee – Jerome W. Klasmeier, Committee Chair

Mr. Klasmeier reported the Facilities Committee met via Zoom on July 14 and August 21 to discuss the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the Moore Road Property, and future procurements. During the summer, the committee was apprised of conversations with the Foundation Executive Committee about plans to bring the project in under budget. The project is currently being re-designed to a smaller scale, while maintaining the four instructional labs. Value engineering is underway to reduce the estimated cost. The committee will continue to receive updates on this project at future meetings. Regarding the Moore Road property sale, the committee received an update and learned that the prospective buyer terminated the agreement due to challenges in obtaining zoning from the county. The one-acre property, owned by the college, was not marketed at the time the agreement was signed and there are not immediate plans to list the property for sale. The committee also discussed changes to previously approved projects, including the Cade building roof, the West campus amphitheater project and the repairs to the Careers building pedestrian bridge. Lastly, the committee reviewed the list of future procurements, noting that there will be many procurements brought for board approval this fiscal year in support of the Health & Life Sciences building. One of these items is on tonight’s agenda for the board’s approval.

F. Human Resources Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair – No report

There was no report from the Human Resources Committee.

G. Report of Trustees’ Liaison to the AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.,Lead Liaison

Ms. Barone read a letter from the recipient of the Pathways to Credit Studies Scholarship. The student, placed her education on hold due to personal and financial obstacles. She is extremely grateful for the scholarship which has enabled her to only have one full-time job while attending school part-time. The student desires to obtain a degree in psychology, then transfer to the University of Maryland to pursue a career as a Child Life Specialist. The student believes the scholarship is a positive light despite the negative effects of COVID-19. Mr. Ulvila was pleased to report the Foundation raised $2.38 million in contributions in FY2020 and provided over $1.1 million to the college for scholarships and program support. Total campaign revenue is now just over $8.25 million. The Foundation recently received a generous gift of $75,000 to support 5 HelpLink, AACC’s program that provides emergency support to students and the Scholarship for Associate Degree Completion. Live! Casino and Hotel also made a generous $50,000 gift to support the ongoing funding of their scholarship for the Dealer Training School. Lastly, the Foundation received a thoughtful planned gift from the Estate of Margaret Burroughs to provide further funding for the Henry D. Burroughs Memorial Scholarship. Mrs. Burroughs was the wife of the late Henry “Hank” Burroughs who was an award-winning photographer who chronicled three decades of news for the Associated Press. This scholarship fund was created to honor his work and help students with an interest in photography and visual arts.

V. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay was pleased to report The League for Innovation in the Community College awarded AACC the 2020 Innovation of the Year Award for its prompt resiliency and vigor during the national pandemic. The award recognized faculty and staff for collaboratively working between divisions to migrate online classes, train faculty and implement tools to allow remote working which enabled the college to better support students. Dr. Lindsay continued to report on August 17 nearly 3,000 people attend AACC’s virtual event, co-hosted with Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Dr. Robin DiAngelo, author of White Fragility, was the guest speaker. Dr. Lindsay pointed out that Dr. DiAngelo invitation to present reflects the college’s continued commitment to tackle systemic racism. Dr. Lindsay also reported on this year’s convocation. The virtual event was held August 18 in CADE 219. She and the vice presidents presented remarks to the community via Zoom, practicing social distance and wearing AACC Riverhawks face masks. Convocation focused on AACC’s response to the COVID pandemic, the new strategic plan, and the college’s continued progress toward greater equity and inclusion. Regarding leadership positions, Dr. Lindsay was pleased to introduce the college’s first inhouse general counsel, Erin Parker. She stated Ms. Parker comes from University of Maryland Global College where she served as deputy general counselor for the last three and a half years and was previously assistant attorney general at the attorney general’s office. Dr. Lindsay was also pleased to announce the college is conducting a national search for the new Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer. Dr. Lindsay continued to report the Riverhawk Recovery Team is regularly meeting to develop a phased-in approach to recovery. The college is currently in Stage 2, which builds upon the few classes offered this summer in the Health Sciences and Police Academy. She reported the college is abiding by Governor Hogan’s recent announcement to move to Stage 3 for spring 2021 where a maximum of 50% face-to-face classes will be offered in selected courses. Lastly, Dr. Lindsay reminded the board that each month a list of talking points are in their board packet. The talking points provide information to share in the community about the great work of the college.
  2. Introduction of New Faculty – Dr. Michael Gavin, Vice President, Learning
    By motion, this item was moved in the agenda to be presented after the approval of the minutes.
  3. Infusing Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Antiracism into the Strategic Plan – Dr. Michael Gavin, Vice President, Learning
    Dr. Gavin reported the college is working to infuse diversity, equity, inclusion, and antiracism into its new strategic plan. He stated the mission, values and philosophy of the college is to ensure all students who come to AACC have an intellectually, culturally and economically satisfying relationship with society. He displayed metrics of retention and graduation rates of students by race and ethnicity which indicated a 6 disparity in African American students. He stated the college is working to reduce the equity gap by taking an antiracism approach to proactively look at policies, practices and interactions to ensure all students, despite demographics, succeed. He advised that the equity agenda will continue for the next four years of the strategic plan. The college will ask the board to assist by looking at policies and procedures to leverage equity gaps. The board policy subcommittee is seeking to revise the Equity, Diversity, Inclusion Policy from the March 2020 board meeting to take a strong stance by including “antiracism” in the policy and inserting language of “antiracism” into two goals of the strategic plan. Additionally, all units in the college will draft goals based on data with equity and anti-racism/eradicating achievement gaps in mind. Dr. Johnson suggested a change to the Engagement objective of the strategic plan. He did not feel antiracist should replace equitable. He felt the college should create both an antiracist and an equitable culture of engagement, as indicated in the Resources objective of the strategic plan. Ms. Barone concurred to consistently use both terms. Ms. Johnson inquired why the graduating rate of African Americans was so low. Dr. Gavin responded the college is continuously working through research, policies, practices and pedagogy to facilitate better rates. Ms. Moore added the board policy committee discussed adding antiracism language to the diversity, equity and inclusion policy. The revised policy will be brought to the board next month.
  4. Enrollment Update – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Dr. Patterson reported the college is still enrolling for 13 week classes and the second eight week classes. She displayed data relevant to enrollment for FY2020. She explained there was a 1.4% headcount decline for credit and noncredit, due largely to the pandemic. Minority student enrollment increased. The headcount for gender remained consistent, 61% female; 39% male. The age group percentage of students under age 20 increased by 4% through dual-enrollment. Ms. Moore asked Dr. Patterson to explain to new trustees what unduplicated headcount meant. Dr. Patterson responded that students may be enrolled in one or more classes, but they are counted only once. Unduplicated headcount is the actual number of individual students enrolled. She continued to explain students taking one online credit course increased 9.5% for FY2020, while students taking only one online credit course increased 15.3%. She was pleased to report summer enrollment increased from 2,728 in 2019 to 3,767 in 2020. Lastly, she stated FTE for the fall is down 1.6% overall.
  5. Monthly Update on Accreditation – Dr. Gregory Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee
    Dr. Schrader reported the steering committee met via Zoom Friday, June 5 and communicated through email throughout the summer. All work teams are populated and training material have been developed. Several members of the steering committee and college leadership will be attending the Middle States Self-Study Institute in the fall. This will allow the steering committee to finalize our self-study design and begin research to write the self-study report. Board member Dr. James Johnson has replaced Dr. Diane Dixon-Proctor, whose term on the board expired, as the board Middle States steering committee member. The steering committee continues to obtain professional development and organize future logistics for the accreditation process.
  6. Student Government Association (SGA) – Ryan Kim, President New SGA President
    Mr. Kim stated the Executive Board and returning senators are optimistically developing new virtual opportunities for engagement among the student body. Following the events on the Black Lives Matter movement, SGA created a statement on the Black Lives Matter Movement along with a published google document which contains useful resources for students. Both are posted on SGA’s Social Media page. In July, SGA also supported International students who might have had concerns with the ruling by the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Moving forward, the SGA will host a weeklong Virtual Club Fair September 14-18 to help students learn more about different 7 opportunities at AACC. SGA will also be creating a Guidebook for the Nest which will contain clubs and organizations at AACC. The website will allow students to join clubs, look at upcoming events, and find contacts for each club. Lastly, on September 21, SGA will host its first General Forum for the fall semester where events and initiatives will be shared and questions and concerns addressed.
  7. Academic Forum/Council – No report
  8. The Faculty Organization (TFO) – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President
    Dr. Tannenbaum reported during the summer many TFO committees worked with administration on resiliency grants and policy and procedural questions related to the college’s mostly-online format. She thanked Vice President of Learning Dr. Gavin, Associate Vice President of Learning and Academic Affairs Dr. Alycia Marshall, and other administrators for working to ensure faculty were involved in the decisions. In August, the organization had one special meeting where the faculty voted to have each committee critically examine their charges, committee membership requirements, outcomes, and policies/procedures to see where changes may be needed to help advance the goals of equity, diversity, inclusion (EDI) and antiracism for students, faculty and staff. In November, the board will receive an update on committee goals.
  9. Professional and Support Staff Organization (PSSO) – Anne Bashore, President
    New PSSO President Ms. Bashore reported the organization hosted its annual retreat on August 13. Ms. Bashore was pleased to report more than 50 members participated to draft two goals for FY2021. It was an historic turnout. She believed the virtual environment allowed greater participation. Ms. Bashore reported goals were presented to Reps and Alts for consideration, and a vote will be called in conjunction with PSSO’s first general assembly meeting on September 15.
  10. Administrative Staff Organization (ASO) – Dr. Danny M. Hoey, Jr., President New ASO President
    Dr. Hoey reported ASO will hold an election in 60 days to elect a new ASO Vice President. The 2020-2021 goals were created to support the 2020-2024 strategic plan. Those goals will be presented at the next board meeting. Dr. Hoey thanked former ASO President Dr. Tiffany Boykin for her leadership, service and mentorship.
  11. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay was pleased to announce Trustee Ulvila as the President of the 2020-2021 MACC Executive Committee. She reported the MACC Board of Directors virtually met on June 30 when she and Trustee Ulvila represented the college. She stated the Maryland Council of Community Council Presidents (MCCCP) virtual retreat was August 3-4. The future of higher education in a post-pandemic era and the status of the state budget were some of the topics discussed. The presidents approved the MACC Capital Prioritization List, reviewed affinity group reports, and reviewed the draft legislative agenda for the 2021 session of the Maryland General Assembly. Once the draft is completed, it will be brought to the board for approval at next month’s public session prior to MACC taking it to the MACC Board of Directors for approval at its meeting on October 28.

V.B.1. Approval of 2020-2021 Full-Time Faculty Appointments – Dr. Michael Gavin, Vice President, Learning

By motion, this item was moved in the agenda to be presented after the approval of the minutes.

V.B.2. Ratification of MHEC Cultural Diversity Report – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay asked the board to ratify its approval of the college’s 2020 Cultural Diversity Report for submission to the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC). On August 21, 2020, following her consultation with the board chair, the summer agenda item was forwarded to the full board with a request for its review and vote. Board members voted via email and approved the report on August 24, 2020, for submission to the Maryland Higher Education Commission by September 1, 2020, as forth in the main motion. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to ratify the approval of Anne Arundel Community College’s 2020 Cultural Diversity Report, as set forth in the main motion of Summer Agenda Item No. 1, dated August 21, 2020.

V.B.3. Ratification of Approval of Award of Contract for Online Exam Proctoring – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning

Dr. Gavin asked the board to ratify its approval of the award of contract for Online Exam Proctoring, as presented in the summer agenda item. On June 17, 2020, following the president’s consultation with the board chair, the summer agenda item was forwarded to the full board with a request for its review and vote. Board members voted via email and approved the award of contract on June 19, 2020, as forth in the main motion. In accordance with the Board of Trustees Bylaws, the board is now being asked to ratify its approval in public session. Dr. Johnson noted the motion for the award of contract for online exam proctoring and the motion for the diversity report refer to Summer Agenda Item No. 1. He inquired both ratifications had the same agenda item number. Dr. Lindsay responded the college will look into the matter. By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to ratify its approval of an emergency contract extension and expansion of Honorlock, Inc. of Boca Raton, Florida, as set forth in the main motion of Summer Agenda Item No. 1, dated June 17, 2020.

V.B.4. Ratification of Approval of Award of Degrees and Certificates for the Remainder of Academic Year – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services

Dr. Patterson asked the board to ratify its approval of the Award of Degrees and Certificates for the Remainder of the Academic Year, as presented in the summer agenda item. On August 10, 2020, following the president’s consultation with the board chair, the summer agenda item was forwarded to the full board with a request for its review and vote. Board members voted via email and approved the award on August 13, 2020, as forth in the main motion. In accordance with the Board of Trustees Bylaws, the board is now being asked to ratify its approval in public session. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to ratify the approval of Award of the Associate Degrees and Certificates as set forth in the main motion of Summer Agenda Item No. 1, dated August 10, 2020.

V.B.5. Approval of Contract for the Purchase of Audiovisual Equipment Services – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services

Dr. Patterson asked the board to approve the Award of Contract for the Purchase of Audiovisual Equipment and Services for the Health and Life Sciences Building (HLSB) under construction on the Arnold Campus, scheduled to open in the fall of 2021. She stated the contract supports the purchase and installation of audiovisual equipment in 83 smart rooms, including 68 instructional rooms and 15 9 conference/meeting rooms. The contract will include installation of smart room equipment, training and two years of warranty on parts and labor in addition to the manufacture warranty. Vendor quotes are listed in the agenda item. The cost for the estimated field adjustments represents Information Services’ estimate (10% of the proposal price) for unforeseen building conditions and minor scope changes. If the board approves the award of contract, the college will issue a purchase order for the equipment in September 2020, with installation planning to begin immediately and to be completed by August 2021. The funding for this project will come from the $12,964,000 furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) budget of the Health and Life Sciences Building capital project. The FF&E budget currently has $11,354,763 in unencumbered and available funds for this and other FF&E purchases; therefore, sufficient funds are available for this contract. Ms. Darrah asked if the scope of the contract had been re-examined since the college completely transitioned to online. Dr. Patterson confirmed the contract was re-examined. She stated the college had multiple meetings with the Division of Learning to ensure the technology is high-end, on the cutting edge of health sciences. Ms. Beardmore stated many health science programs have an in-person component. She explained that while the college has remote classes, programs for health sciences require physical presence in labs and/or with mannequins. As such, the Florestano building has many in-person programs as required by accreditation. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the award of contract for the purchase of audiovisual equipment and services for the new Health and Life Sciences Building to Lee Hartman & Sons, Inc. in an amount not to exceed $2,171,198. Dr. Lindsay advised that Ms. Thomas emailed her addressing Dr. Johnson’s concern regarding motions for ratification having the same Summer Agenda Item number. Whereas exhibits in the agenda items display the same number (Summer Agenda Item No. 1), dates distinguish them. Varying dates reflect the date each item was sent to the board for their review. The dates appear at the bottom of the page within the exhibit’s name.

VII. NEW BUSINESS

Mr. Klasmeier inquired about the county’s commitment to the college for its FY2021 budget. Ms. Beardmore responded in late June the college received notice of a $4 million state reduction for its FY2021 budget. She stated although the college has not received any further notice regarding additional cuts and is not aware of any county reduction, it is remaining conservative in fiscal management. Dr. Lindsay added the county executive supports the college and has thanked her for its service to the community.

VIII. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Chair Moore advised that the next board meeting will be October 13, 2020.

IX. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 5:45 p.m.

Respectfully submitted, Dr. Dawn Lindsay Secretary-Treasurer

Oct. 13, 2020, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Kathleen Johnson; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting is being recorded pursuant to state law.

Ms. Moore asked Executive Assistant to the Board of Trustees Tracie Thomas to do a roll call for approval of the meeting agenda. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the October 13, 2020, Board of Trustees public session agenda.

II. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

III. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Minutes of the September 8, 2020, Board of Trustees Meeting

By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the minutes of the September 8, 2020, Board of Trustees public session.

CHANGE IN THE ORDER OF THE AGENDA

Mr. Klasmeier requested the order of the agenda be changed to move Agenda Item V.A.2 (Sabbatical Reports) to this point in the meeting. The Board of Trustees unanimously approved the change in the agenda.

Dr. Gavin introduced three faculty members who received sabbatical leave approval from the Board of Trustees.

Through recorded video, Associate Professor Tim Callinan reported that his sabbatical gave him the opportunity to research Computer Aided Manufacturing being used at local firms in order to produce curriculum that could potentially fill a gap in skilled machinists in Anne Arundel County. His research included the study of necessary curricular changes, a sequence of courses for Solid-Modeling and Rapid Prototyping, and a certificate in Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing. His sabbatical will enhance AACC’s engineering program and will support the college’s current direction on enrollment strategies for the Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades.

Professor of English Dr. Susan Cohen reported her sabbatical gave her the opportunity to work on a book that examines how different communities respond to food deserts, conservation efforts and poverty using lawns for food and vertical farming. Her sabbatical will prepare students for the emerging need for 10 environmental writers to work with scientists, government programs and non-profits as the conduit between the experts in the field and readers who are interest in environmental issues.

Program Coordinator of Performing Arts Lynda Fitzgerald reported her sabbatical allowed her to examine gender inequities of pay, treatment, stereotypes, scandals, and success in the field of dance. Her sabbatical enabled her to investigate dance in higher education through the lens of gender to ensure the college’s curriculum is current and forward-thinking. She ultimately proposes to create a new curriculum focused on gender, while applying what she learned to recruit and staff AACC’s dance program.

IV. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Audit and Finance Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair - No report

There was no report from the Audit and Finance Committee.

B. Board Development Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair – Report

Ms. Darrah reported the committee met on September 22 to recap the history of the committee for new members and review board goals which were last revised in 2017-2018. The committee also discussed best practices of other boards and suggestions for development events, activities and training. There is still work to be completed on board goals and research will be done on professional development activities for the board this year. Once a plan has been developed, the committee will make its recommendation to the board.

C. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula A. Darrah, Board Representative and Committee Chair

Ms. Darrah reported at the September board meeting, the board received recommendations for the removal of two policies (Students Rights and Responsibilities and the Policy and Procedures for the Management of Disruptive Behavior of Students), and the revision of two policies (Waivers to Tuition and Fees and the Investment Policy). Upon the recommendation of the committee, the board is being asked to approve the deletion and revision of these policies. Ms. Darrah explained each policy.

Regarding the Removal of the Students Rights and Responsibilities Policy, this policy, approved by the board on March 16, 1983 is outdated, using references to terms, offices and organizations at the college that are no longer relevant and mentioning rights for students that are legal rights. Because it is a boardapproved policy, the board is being asked to approve its deletion and removal from the board policy manual. If the board approves the deletion/removal of this policy, it will be deleted and removed from the board policy manual effective October 13, 2020. There are no fiscal implications.

Regarding the Policy and Procedures for the Management of Disruptive Behavior of Students, the policy, approved by the board on April 11, 1995 is outdated and duplicates what is in the board-approved Student Conduct Policy and Procedures in the Student Code of Conduct at the college-level. Because it is a board-approved policy, the board is being asked to approve its deletion/removal from the board policy manual. If the board approves the deletion/removal of this policy, it will be deleted and removed from the board policy manual effective October 13, 2020. There are no fiscal implications.

Regarding the revised Waivers to Tuition and Fees, the college currently has a board-approved Waivers to Tuition and Fees policy, which was last revised on September 13, 2016. The Committee recommends updating the language in this policy to reflect the updated name of act pertaining to qualified unaccompanied homeless youth and the new state provision for the parent of a deaf or hard of hearing child. Legal counsel and AACC staff have worked on the revisions to be added to the existing board- 10 approved policy. The effective date of the revised policy is recommended as October 13, 2020. If the board approves the policy, it will become effective the same date. Ms. Darrah reported there were no fiscal implications.

Because two additional categories were being added, Dr. Johnson believed a remission to tuition and fees would exist. As such, he felt there would be fiscal implications. Ms. Parker confirmed the college is legally mandated to offer the waiver. Recognizing some costs would exist, Dr. Johnson requested the fiscal implications of the agenda item be amended to reflect minor ones. The motion will remain the same.

Regarding the revised Investment Policy, the college currently has a board-approved Investment Policy, which was adopted on October 10, 1995. The committee recommends updating this policy to be consistent with the other board policies by removing the procedures. The policy itself aligns with the state law, which authorizes the types of investments the college can make. Legal counsel and AACC staff have worked on the revisions to be added to the existing board-approved policy. The effective date of the revised policy is recommended as October 13, 2020. If the board approves the policy, it will become effective the same date. There are no fiscal implications.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the removal of the Students and Responsibilities Policy, as shown in Exhibit 1 in the main motion, effective October 13, 2020.

By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the removal of the Policy and Procedures for the Management of Disruptive Behavior of Students, as shown in Exhibit 1 in the main motion, effective October 13, 2020.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the revised Waivers to Tuitions and Fees, as shown in Exhibit 1 in the main motion, effective October 13, 2020.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the revised Investment Policy, as shown in Exhibit 1 in the main motion, effective October 13, 2020.

D. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

Dr. Johnson reported the committee met via Zoom on September 10, 2020, to discuss the following: the Administrative Services Review project; the FY2020 Budget Closeout; the FY2021 Budget and Scenario Planning; Lab Fee Analysis; the Riverhawk Recovery Plan; and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Rick Staisloff and Lee Schwentker of rpk Group provided an update on the status of opportunities identified in the Administrative Services Review project. During the meeting, projections were discussed for the FY2020 operating budget and the anticipated impact on the tuition stabilization fund. The committee also received an initial projection for the FY2021 operating budget. Cost savings initiatives have offset revenue reductions, and administration continues to plan for multiple revenue scenarios during the year. Regarding lab fees, the committee was informed that deans and assistant deans completed an analysis of lab fees which will be brought forward as Agenda Item V.B.6. The committee also received an update on the Riverhawk Recovery Plan, and as a result, requested a presentation to the full board, Agenda Item V.A.5. Lastly, the committee was advised that the college continues to address critical items using restricted funding of the CARES Act. The college anticipates to fully utilize the student funding in the fall semester, maximizing the amount available in the institutional support funds.

E. Facilities Committee – Jerome W. Klasmeier, Committee Chair

Mr. Klasmeier reported the September 15 committee meeting was cancelled. In lieu of the meeting, a written update was provided to the committee which included future procurements, and updates on the Health & Life Sciences building and The Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades. Mr. Klasmeier stated the Health & Life Sciences building project continues to be on schedule and within budget. Regarding the Clauson Center, the college continues to work with GBA Architects, Whiting Turner, and the college’s internal team to re-design the project towards the budget goal. The re-design involves the elimination of a general-purpose classroom and adjustments to the entrance of the building with the size of the building moving from 14,484 square feet to 11,288 square feet. Mr. Klasmeier was pleased to report all instructional labs will remain in the facility and in the current version of the design, they became slightly larger. Ms. Moore inquired if downsizing the building would impact future building expansion. Ms. Beardmore responded the only impact would be adding restrooms.

F. Human Resources Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair – No report

There was no report from the Human Resources Committee.

G. Report of Trustees’ Liaison to the AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.,Lead Liaison

Ms. Barone read a letter from the recipient of the Joyce Hall Memorial Scholarship. The student and mother of two is grateful for the opportunity to finish prerequisites for the nursing program. She praised her advisors and professors who helped her smoothly and comfortably transition to college. She is honored to be the recipient of the scholarship, as it will help her fulfill the dream to become a nurse. Ms. Moore added the Joyce Hall Scholarship was endowed by former trustee Walter Hall in memory of his wife. As such, she asked the college to send the student letter to Mr. Hall.

Mr. Ulvila was pleased to report the as of September 30, 2020 the fundraising total for the current fiscal year is just over $252,000 in gifts and commitments. Total campaign revenue is approximately $8.35 million. He was also pleased to report the work of AACC’s Office of Sponsored Programs and Dean Kip Kunsman enabled the college to receive Governors Emergency Education Response funding. A portion of the award has been allocated to supporting the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades. Mr. Ulvila reported the AACC Foundation’s 2020 Impact Report will be mailed this week. This year’s report focuses on the three pillars of the College’s campaign: Powerful Workforce Programs; Enhanced Student Services; and Scholarships. This is the final year for the campaign, which concludes in June 2021. The campaign has been highly successful, and the Foundation is working

V. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay was pleased to report on September 8 and 9, over 200 faculty staff and students participated in a Teach-In professional development training. The training provided the opportunity to learn from each other, reflect and consider ways to begin dismantling institutional systemic racism. She was also pleased to share the college’s practical nursing program was tied for number one in Maryland based on the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses, and the Medical Assistant Advice, ranked the college’s medical assisting program number one in Maryland. Dr. Lindsay reported that on October 1, she presented an overview of the strategic plan to the college. She explained the strategic plan focused on three core areas: entry, progress, and completion, and is based on the premise that people matter more than projects, and equity is essential to our focus and 10 culture. Her presentation provided an update on initiatives that are already underway. Dr. Lindsay stated she also informed the college that the search for the new chief diversity officer is ongoing, and the search committee is conducting its first round of screening interviews. On October 7, Dr. Lindsay was honored to receive recognition from the Anne Arundel County Public Schools Board at its general meeting for the college’s leadership and continued partnership with the Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Dr. Lindsay added that on October 8, the college was selected by the Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT) to present at the annual ACCT Leadership Conference. Trustee Ulvila, Foundation Board President Colin Murray, Foundation Executive Director Vollie Melson joined her in a virtual presentation about AACC’s Strategic and Innovative Partnership to Meet the Needs of Students in the Community – the story about The Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades. Lastly, Dr. Lindsay reported the college was scheduled to host the League of Innovation in Annapolis. Although the in-person meeting will not occur, the college will virtually host it on Thursday, October 15.
  2. Agenda Item V.A.2., was moved to follow Agenda Item III.A
  3. Maintaining Quality College-Wide in a Remote Environment – Dr. Michael Gavin, Vice President, Learning and Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Dr. Gavin reported on having a quality college-wide experience in a remote environment. This included a focus on equity, diversity, and inclusion with high quality online experiences for students. He stated during the pandemic, the college was able to successfully convert 160 courses (including all sections) to ensure equity-based practices, accessibility, and training for all faculty. He was pleased to share the 160 courses are Q-CAR compliant, which is a nationally recognized way to benchmark quality. He stated faculty who had not taught online were required to receive professional development training prior to teaching. Online SYNC was also developed to give students actual times during the day to meet with their online class. Dr. Gavin was pleased to share that as a result of COVID-19, in six months the college was able to accomplish long-term goals originally set for year 2023. Dr. Patterson stated the online strategy involves the health and wellness of students. The college continues to outreach and educate students on how to best care for themselves with personal counselors available for those who might be struggling. This includes a direct connection to tutoring and student achievement, helping students develop through leadership opportunities, clubs, voter engagement, and student organizations. Dr. Patterson stated one divisional goal is to evaluate current virtual services to implement improvements and enhancements. She explained that every department will do this assessment and then embed action steps in their improvement plans. Additionally the college is strengthening virtual partnerships in the county and beyond to improve enrollment and retention. Dr. Patterson described how the college is helping faculty and staff with their own health and wellness. Human Resources provides workshops and check-ins, and Dr. Lindsay has instituted No Meeting Fridays. Dr. Patterson stated the services delivered are consistent with the guiding principles to ensure best practices are implemented in a remote environment.
  4. Emergency Preparedness – Sean Kapfhammer, Chief of Police
    Mr. Kapfhammer provided an overview of emergency preparedness and response at the college. He explained the Emergency Management Structure stating the president, vice presidents and college attorney make executive level decisions during an emergency. The president will keep the board informed in those instances. The Emergency Manager heads the Emergency Operations Center comprised of operations, logistics, planning and finance, and administrative sections. The manager is responsible for continuity of the operations plan should a major disruption occur. The first line of defense is the Omni-Alert system. It is the primary notification platform for all emergencies and is used in the 10 event of an emergency, college closing and traffic alerts. Students are automatically enrolled when registering. The system is tested before the start of each semester. All new employees receive emergency training that includes active shooter response. Flip charts for responding to emergencies are in all classrooms, and all buildings have floor coordinators equipped with safety supplies to aid with evacuation. Mr. Kapfhammer stated most campus officers have 25 years prior experience from large agencies. All receive Alert Training and yearly drills for responding to an armed person incident. Regarding pandemic recovery efforts, the college has instituted attestation forms, social distancing planning, and PPE mask guideline requirements. Ms. Barone shared as a student; she has never felt unsafe during the past four years. Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez complimented Mr. Kapfhammer on his presentation, stating it was the best briefing she has ever heard about law enforcement on campus safety. Ms. Moore asked what the board should do if an emergency alert occurred. Mr. Kapfhammer responded the alert will tell you what the emergency is, and the president will notify the board about what to do and where to go if trustees were on campus. Dr. Lindsay concurred stating she would notify the board chair first if such an incident occurred.
  5. Riverhawk Recovery Plan Update – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management
    Ms. Beardmore stated although the college quickly made the decision to go online in March-April, reopening to a new environment is more challenging and takes longer. She stated the college has robust fiscal planning to get through the pandemic; most of the impact will be in FY2021. She advised that the college is following state directives, county regulations, and aligning with CDC guidelines but is taking a more conservative approach towards reopening the college. Ms. Beardmore stated the college has transitioned from Emergency Management mode – managing the crisis – to recovery phase. The president and vice presidents meet three times a week to make policy-level decisions. Nine teams have been established that report up to the Policy Group to mirror emergency management best practices. Each team has a leader and an assigned member of the Policy Group. Teams 5 and 6 drive the work. Those teams focus on how the college will offer classes and student services. Ms. Beardmore stated anyone on campus is required to wear a mask and practice social distancing. She pointed out the stages of recovery may not necessarily align with semesters. Stage 2 is currently where the college is for fall. The college is planning towards Stage 3 for the spring when more students may be on campus. She added the Riverhawk Recovery page on the website has a vast wealth of information on recovery efforts and stages for students, parents and employees.
  6. Monthly Accreditation Report – Dr. Gregory Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee
    Dr. Schrader reported the steering committee has begun the Self-Study Institute training and has met with Vice President Dr. Robert Bonfiglio, who will be the point of contact through the reaccreditation process. The Self-Study Institute training will be completed November 10, and the Steering Committee will finalize the self-study design. The Steering Committee continues to obtain professional development and organize future logistics for the accreditation process.
  7. Student Government Association (SGA) – Ryan Kim, President New SGA President
    Mr. Kim reported that SGA had its first general forum meeting on September 20 where the SGA executive board was introduced. SGA received eight applications for senator recruitment. The Guidebook for the Nest is near completion. SGA is partnering with Links Incorporated, an international non-for-profit corporation focusing on women’s issues, social justice, and health care, to work on a brochure geared towards voter registration in the county. SGA is also working to create a club competition event to engage club membership. Lastly, SGA is planning a high school event to showcase classes and opportunities offered at AACC.
  8. Academic Forum/Council – No report
  9. The Faculty Organization (TFO) – No report
  10. Professional and Support Staff Organization (PSSO) – Anne Bashore, President
    Ms. Bashore reported the first PSSO meeting was held on September 15 with 66 members in attendance. The PSSO constitution was discussed along with an overview of the organization’s representation at the college. Human Resources provided an update as well. PSSO representatives voted to approve two goals for FY21 which consisted of building positive connections and community and creating opportunities for collaboration in innovation and equity. Lastly, Ms. Bashore shared how the engagement and community service committees are expanding their service in a remote environment.
  11. Administrative Staff Organization (ASO) – Dr. Danny M. Hoey, Jr., President New ASO President
    Dr. Hoey reported that Jill Bennett was elected Vice President of ASO. Then, he shared the following proposed ASO goals for 2020-2021: (1) supporting professional development with the focus on equity and anti-racism to eradicate achievement gaps; (2) collaborating with other constituency groups to foster better communication to support the strategic plan; and (3) fostering stronger communication and idea sharing between members of ASO.
  12. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay stated the MACC Board of Directors will meet on October 28, 2020. At that meeting, the MACC Board of Directors will vote to approve the 2021 MACC Legislative Agenda, which is Agenda Item V.B.1 for the board’s approval. Lastly, Dr. Lindsay reported that the annual MACC Trustee Leadership Conference and Legislative Reception is scheduled for Monday, January 25, 2021, 4 – 7:30 p.m.

V.B.1. Approval of MACC of the Draft 2021 MACC Legislative Agenda* – Dr. Dawn S. Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay stated the draft 2021 MACC Legislative Agenda includes items for legislative action at the state level on issues that affect the well-being of Maryland’s community colleges and the thousands of students they serve. The draft 2021 Legislative Agenda was developed by MACC staff over the summer and presented and approved by community college presidents at the Maryland Council of Community College Presidents retreat held August 3-4, 2020. The draft 2021 MACC Legislative Agenda will be presented to the MACC Board of Directors for approval on October 28, 2020. With the board’s approval of the draft 2021 MACC Legislative Agenda, an affirmative vote will be cast on behalf of the college to approve the Legislative Agenda at the October 28, 2020 meeting of the MACC Board of Directors. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to ratify the approval the draft 2021 MACC Legislative Agenda as presented in Exhibit 1.

V.B.2. Approval of Contract for Printing and Mailing Services for the Credit Schedule of Classes and Wingspan Magazine – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management

Ms. Beardmore reported the scope of this year’s contract reflects a comprehensive outreach plan to multiple audiences for the spring and beyond. The contract includes the printing and mailing for several categories of communications: credit class marketing; the noncredit schedule classes for spring, summer, fall and winter; the Wingspan Magazine in spring and fall; and additional ad hoc marketing promotions. The contract will be awarded through a cooperative contract that was awarded to Indiana Printing and Publishing by the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC). By riding an existing contract competitively solicited by CCBC, the college can meet state procurement laws while leveraging 10 the purchasing power of cooperative participants. By transitioning to this contract, the college anticipates saving of approximately $97,000 annually off the base contract, which will be redeployed to other marketing strategies. Ms. Beardmore pointed out the marketing strategy for credit programs is focused on directing students online to the most up-to-date information available. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Ms. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to approve the contract for the printing and mailing of services for the credit marketing materials, noncredit schedule of classes, Wingspan Magazine, and additional ad hoc marketing promotions to Indiana Printing and Publishing Co., of Indiana, Pennsylvania, in the amount not to exceed $498,500.

V.B.3. Approval of Contract for the Purchase of Personal Computer Equipment – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services

Dr. Patterson asked the board to approve the purchase of personal computer equipment for the Health and Life Sciences Building (HLSB) under construction on the Arnold Campus. The types and number of personal computer equipment to be procured as well as the unit costs are presented in Exhibit 1. Dr. Patterson explained how the computers would be used and where they will be deployed. This purchase will be made via the Maryland Education Enterprise Consortium contract. The amount represents information services 10% estimate of the quoted price for unforeseen configuration changes and minor scope changes. If the board approves the award of contract, the college will begin implementation planning immediately with installation to be completed in fall 2021. The funding for this project will come from the $12,964,000 furniture fixtures and equipment (FF&E) budget of the HLSB capital project. The FF&E budget currently has $9,176,255 in unencumbered and available funds for this purchase; therefore, sufficient funds are available for this contract. By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Ms. Barone, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to approve the contract for the purchase of Dell computer equipment for the new Health and Life Sciences Building from Dell Marketing, L.P., of Round Rock, TX, in an amount not to exceed $762,148.

V.B.4. Approval of the 2020 Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) Performance Accountability Report (PAR) – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning

Dr. Gavin reported the annual report is required by MHEC. As a result of COVID-19, the deadline extended to November 6. Dr. Gavin explained PAR includes student characteristics and 34 indicators of how the institution is doing. He stated there is a direct alignment between the PAR and the key performance indicators set in the strategic plan. He reported students with developmental education needs total 23.9% of credit students. This is a huge distinction from last year, as this year the college is focusing mainly on GPA to measure placement. Dr. Gavin shared that the college serves an increasingly diverse population which includes 39.6% nonwhite student body; 26.6% first-generation students; 29% receiving financial aid; and 33.4% are students 27 years of age or older. Dr. Gavin was pleased to share the following: the health sciences programs have a 100% pass rate and job placement; the fall-to-fall retention rate for developmental students increased to 70.6%; enrollment in continuing workforce development courses increased; and, employer satisfaction with contract training remains at 100%. He stated PAR helps leverage the strategic plan. If the board approves this report, it will be submitted to MHEC by November 6, 2020. By motion of Ms. Barone, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to approve Anne Arundel Community College’s 2020 Performance Accountability Report, as shown in Exhibit 1, for submission to the Maryland Higher Education Commission by November 6, 2020.

V.B.5. Approval of Award of Contract for an Online Registration Solution for Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD) – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning

Dr. Gavin reported this contract will increase access, equity, efficiency and the overall customer experience for students and contract clients. He stated the system will integrate with the college’s enterprise resource planning system, Ellucian’s Colleague. Dr. Gavin explained the existing online noncredit registration system operates through Ellucian’s WebAdvisor, which has a planned cessation date of June 30, 2022. AACC will need a new system to support noncredit registration online, which currently accounts for approximately 25% of all noncredit registrations. In accordance with the purchasing regulations established under the Maryland Annotated Code and Board policy, the college publicly advertised and solicited sealed competitive proposals. Based on certain criteria, Destiny Solutions is the highest scoring firm. If the board approves this award of contract, the college will immediately begin final contract negotiations, and issue a purchase order for the planned implementation services and the initial year of service. The implementation work will begin in October and will be completed by June 30, 2021. The funding for this project will come from the annual Information Services operating budget. The amount allocated for this contract is $310,934 over the two-year contract term ($208,047 FY2021 and $102,887 FY2022). Subject to continuing appropriation, sufficient funds will be available for this contract. Dr. Johnson inquired about the large difference of costs between Destiny Solutions and the second firm. Dr. Gavin stated other firms must create a software solution. Destiny Solutions has software specifically designed for higher education and continuing education registration processes. This results in cost savings. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to approve the award of contract for the purchase and implementation services of the online registration system to Destiny Solutions of Ontario, Canada with an estimated two-year cost not to exceed $310,934.

V.B.6. Approval of New and Revised Lab Fees – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning

Dr. Gavin explained as the college continued planning and recovery efforts in response to COVID-19, it became clear the Spring 2020 and fiscal year 2021 lab fees approved in the annual budget process required revision based on the current operating environment. As a result, the Division of Learning completed a lab fee analysis to include the planed utilization through the Spring 2021 semester. If the board approves the revision in lab fees, the college will begin actions to revise the fees as outlined in the exhibit, and as appropriate, refund student accounts. Due to the manual nature of the refunds, it is anticipated that this process will require approximately 120 days to complete. Any revisions to lab fees beyond the Spring 2021 semester will be addressed in the annual budgeting process. The overall fiscal impact is budget neutral as we budget all lab fee revenue to be fully spent on the purchase of supplies and or services to be consumed by students. By refunding and suspending these fees, the college anticipates saving students over $555,000. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted unanimously to approve the new and revised lab fees as outlined in Exhibit 1.

VII. NEW BUSINESS

VIII. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Chair Moore advised that the next board meeting will be November 10, 2020.

IX. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:36 p.m.

Respectfully submitted, Dr. Dawn Lindsay Secretary-Treasurer

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on October 13, 2020, at 3 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to §3-305(b)(1)(i) and §3-305(b)(7) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code § 3-305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, chair, Paula J. Darrah, vice chair, Bri Barone, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Kathleen Johnson, Jerome W. Klasmeier, and Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr. The meeting began at 3 p.m. and ended at 3:55 p.m. A session of the Board of Trustees was held on October 20, 2020, at 4:30 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to §3-305(b)(1)(i) and §3-305(b)(7) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code § 3-305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, chair, Paula J. Darrah, vice chair, Bri Barone, Dr. James H. Johnson, Kathleen Johnson, Jerome W. Klasmeier, Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., and Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez. The meeting began at 4:30 p.m. and ended at 5:38 p.m.

Nov. 10, 2020, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Kathleen Johnson; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting is being recorded pursuant to state law.

Ms. Moore asked Executive Assistant to the Board of Trustees Tracie Thomas to do a roll call for approval of the meeting agenda. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the November 10, 2020, Board of Trustees public session agenda.

II. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

III. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Minutes of the October 13, 2020, Board of Trustees Public Session Meeting

By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the minutes of the October 13, 2020, Board of Trustees public session.

B. Minutes of the October 20, 2020, Board of Trustees Closed Session Meeting

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the minutes of the October 20, 2020, Board of Trustees closed session.

IV. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Audit and Finance Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair - Report

Dr. Johnson reported the committee met via Zoom on October 20, 2020, to discuss the audit review and results of the FY2020 audit with Christina Bowman, Principal, from CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP. The auditors issued an unmodified or clean opinion with no management advisory letter, material weaknesses, significant deficiencies, control deficiencies, or audit adjustments. Ms. Bowman noted that the Federal Compliance Supplement, which prescribes the required testing, has not been finalized and as a result, the auditors cannot complete the single audit at this time. The Federal government’s Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has been delayed in the finalization of the requirements because of COVID-19. In addition, there is significant work necessary for OMB to develop appropriate testing requirements for the federal stimulus funds awarded in response to the economic impact of COVID-19 earlier this year. Ms. Bowman noted she anticipates the compliance supplement will be finalized later this fall. The committee discussed and agreed that the Board should accept the basic financial statement audit reports this evening to avoid additional costs and unnecessary testing that is required by the auditors up to the date of issuance of their audit reports. This will allow the college to submit the basic 2 financial reports to the Maryland Higher Education Commission and receive a separate audit report on the results of the single audit once the compliance supplement is finalized later this fall. Regarding the basic financial statement audit process and results, Ms. Bowman stated they did not encounter any difficulties in the completion of their work, noting that all requested documentation and reports were available upon request. She complimented the management team on their preparation. The committee discussed the FY2021 operating budget status report as of September 30, 2020, and the anticipated annual results, noting the college is operating within existing resources. The Board has been provided the college’s FY2020 audited financial statements as prepared by college management and audited by CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP. On the recommendation of the Audit and Finance Committee, the Board is being asked to accept the financial statements and supplemental material as provided in Agenda Item IV.A.1

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously accepted the college’s FY2020 financial statements audited by CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP.

B. Board Development Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair – Report

Ms. Darrah reported the committee met October 19, 2020 and completed a list of professional development training opportunities available from various community colleges and board organizations and associations. The committee’s recommendations will be emailed to board members. At the next committee meeting, the committee will review topics for other professional development opportunities customized for board training.

C. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula A. Darrah, Board Representative and Committee Chair

There was no report from the Board Policy Oversight Committee.

D. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

Dr. Johnson reported the committee met via Zoom on November 6, 2020, to discuss the Administrative Services Review project, the FY2021 Financial Status Report, the FY2022 Preliminary Guiding Principles and Base Assumptions, and the Riverhawk Recovery Plan. Rick Staisloff and Lee Schwentker of the RPK Group presented the status of opportunities identified in Phase 2 in the Administrative Services Review project. Phase 2 of the project focused on opportunities in the areas of how to leverage technology, strategic sourcing in procurement, academic administrative workflow, and alternative revenue streams. The committee also discussed the FY2021 Financial Status Report. The current projection reflects a balanced budget with expenses within their appropriation authority and numbers to be adjusted throughout the year. Tuition and fees revenue are projected to slightly exceed the budget. Expenditure savings due to holding positions vacant and other reductions is generating savings that is estimated to add to the college’s tuition stabilization fund. In the Spring, the college will strategically release funds for critical purchases. The committee also reviewed the FY2022 Preliminary Guiding Principles and Base Assumptions which will guide the development of the college’s FY2022 budget. Lastly, the committee received a Riverhawk Recovery plan update which focused on the CARES Act. The college is on target to disburse the remaining student portion of the CARES Act funds.

E. Facilities Committee – Jerome W. Klasmeier, Committee Chair

Mr. Klasmeier reported the committee met via Zoom on October 29, 2020, to discuss the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the Health & Life Sciences building, the closure of the Center for Cyber and Professional Training, and procurements. Regarding the Clauson Center, the committee received an updated rendering of the building, noting that the main changes to the design are the elimination of a 3 general-purpose classroom and a new entrance. Both contribute to the newly designed facility coming in at 11,286 square feet. The instructional labs have not been impacted, and under the new design, they are slightly larger. The next milestone in the project occurs during the week of November 23 when Whiting Turner is due to submit its estimate on the 50% construction documents. The Clauson Center is scheduled to be substantially complete in October 2021 with classes to start in January 2022. The Health & Life Sciences building project continues to be on-schedule, within budget, and on track to attain LEED gold certification. Regarding the Center for Cyber and Professional Training item, the committee received an update on the need to attain Board approval to formally close the location as required by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. This item is on tonight’s agenda for the Board’s approval. Lastly, the committee was provided with drafts of two future procurements, one of which is on the agenda for board approval tonight.

F. Human Resources Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair

Mr. Ulvila reported the committee met via Zoom on October 26, 2020, to receive updates on Employee Benefits, the COVID-19 Dashboard, and supporting the workforce during COVID-19. Suzanne Boyer, executive director of human resources, provided an update on the college’s employee benefit plans stating there are no plan design changes from the county. She also reported the college will be conducting a dependent verification in Spring 2021 to validate that all dependents are appropriately included on the insurance plan. The committee was presented with a snapshot of a new COVID dashboard that the college is using to track high-level trends on employee and student COVID-19 cases. The committee commended the college for internally creating the dashboard and recognized the work of Monica Herbert and John Englehart in Human Resources who created it. Lastly, the committee received an update on how the college is supporting the workforce during the pandemic.

G. Report of Trustees’ Liaison to the AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.,Lead Liaison

Ms. Barone read a letter from the recipient of the Scholarship for Associate Degree Completion. The student is honored to have received the award because the funding allows her to further her education and career goals as a part-time Patient Care Assistant in Baltimore Washington Medical Center and a full-time student. The scholarship motivates her to maintain a good grade point average which will help her pursue a master’s degree as a Nurse Practitioner. The student is grateful for AACC faculty and staff who supports and encourages her to academically thrive. She is looking forward to giving back to the community where she began her nursing career. Ms. Barone was pleased to share that twenty-nine students graduated with their Associate Degree at the conclusion of the spring semester in 2020 thanks to the generosity of the donors who funded the Scholarship for Associate Degree Completion.

Mr. Ulvila was pleased to report as of October 28, 2020 the fundraising total for the current fiscal year is just over $453,000 in gifts and commitments. Total campaign revenue is just over $8.5 Million. The Foundation received a generous $75,000 grant from the France-Merrick Foundation for the Clauson Center. The France-Merrick Foundation invests in nonprofit organizations that serve the unique needs of people and places throughout Maryland. The Foundation also received a $100,000 contribution from the estate of Henry L. Dragun to create the Henry L. Dragun Memorial Scholarship to support students in the Life Sciences or Physical Sciences. Dr. Dragun’s contributions to AACC over the years made a positive impact on the lives of countless students.

H. Board Chair’s Report on Public Session – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore stated Senator Bryan Simonaire contacted her last month for the Board to consider public comments. Although the state of Maryland does not require public comments, Ms. Moore stated Legal Counsel Erin Parker is gathering information from other community colleges to identify how the college can obtain public comment. More information will be provided in the future.

V. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay was pleased to report that last week the search committee invited three finalists for the Chief Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Officer position to meet with the leadership team and to present their background and vision of the position to the college community. The virtual open forums provided an opportunity for faculty, students and staff to meet the finalists, ask questions and submit their feedback. The final interviews will be tomorrow. Dr. Lindsay stated although AACC was originally scheduled to host the Fall League for Innovation in the Community College Board meeting last month, the meeting was virtually held on October 15. She was pleased to report the college will be the host in fall 2022. Depending upon Governor Hogan’s press conference this afternoon, Dr. Lindsay reported that sports will return to AACC this spring. In preparation, athletes will begin outdoor practices and conditioning on campus. Dr. Lindsay thanked everyone working behind the scenes to prepare and keep athletes, coaches and staff healthy and safe. She continued to report the college is currently in Stage 2 of the Riverhawk Recovery Program and is working toward Stage 3 for spring 2021. In addition to the face-to-face classes running in Stages 1 and 2, the college will schedule up to a maximum of 50% face-to-face classes for composition, reading, math and other select courses. Lastly, Dr. Lindsay stated in celebration of Veteran’s Day tomorrow, the college will recognize and honor active military and veterans throughout the month with virtual events and activities. This year’s theme is “Veterans Forging Forward,” an appropriate sentiment as we work together to forge ahead during this pandemic.
  2. Enrollment and Dashboard Update – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Dr. Patterson reported the college is trying to stabilize enrollment through the pandemic. For Fall 2020, she stated nationally community college enrollment is down 9.4%, and first-time student enrollment is down 22.7%. Dr. Patterson provided enrollment data for fall 2020 comparing it to enrollment data in fall 2019. Credit headcount declined 5.6%. Full-time equivalent (FTE), which is the number of enrolled credits for the fall divided by 15, decreased 5.9%. Returning students decreased 2.8%, and new students decreased 12.63%. Enrollment for part-time students increased while full-time enrollment moderately decreased. Female students increased to 62.4% while males decreased to 37.6%. Students taking at least one distance learning course dramatically increased to 96.2%; Students taking at least one online course increased 95.8%; and dually enrolled high school students increased. Dr. Patterson stated that although the retention rate slightly decreased, the college is working to improve retention, given the current environment.
  3. Strategic Communications Update – Dan Baum, Executive Director of Strategic Communications
    Mr. Baum reported how Strategic Communications (SC) uses paid, earned, shared, and owned media to effectively communicate when the community transitioned to 100% online due to a national pandemic. He stated all communication is intentionally integrated showing repetition of the messaging and imagery to reinforce the positive reputation of the college. He explained when COVID-19 struck, SC established web pages which evolved into an emergency management page with frequently asked questions and updates on the college transition to online. Thereafter, the Riverhawk Recovery webpage evolved on the homepage with information about health and safety, teaching and student services. To maintain a sense of community while remotely working, SC built a microsite called Riverhawks at Home. The site enabled 5 faculty and staff to stay connected through encouraging and inspiriting posts. SC also developed an inhouse video called Riverhawk Ready Ways to Take a Course to help students understand how to take online courses. (A segment of the video was played). Additionally, SC uses Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, and Vine for social marketing. Mr. Baum was pleased to report the growth of Instagram where stories are shared and the community, particularly the younger audience, stay engaged. He added that the college has earned the trust and confidence of The Sun and The Capital who are reporting what the college is doing throughout the pandemic. Mr. Baum stated SC uses paid media to advertise through print, radio, cable TV and search engine marketing. (Marketing infomercials were played for fall and summer advertisements.) Mr. Baum was pleased to report all videos were remotely produced in-house during the pandemic. He stated about 50% of their advertising is digital. Lastly, Mr. Baum stated the work of his department centers around the strategic plan. SC uses paid, earned, shared and owned media to raise awareness and encourage people to consider AACC at the point of entry.
  4. Monthly Accreditation Report – Dr. Gregory Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee
    Dr. Schrader reported the steering committee will meet Friday, November 13, 2020. Today, they completed the Self-Study Institute Training. Thereafter, the Self-Study Design will be developed. The committee will gather input from the president, vice presidents, constituency groups and the student government association. Once the Self-Study Design is complete, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education Vice President Dr. Robert Bonfiglio will schedule a virtual visit to discuss the Self-Study Design and AACC’s progress in the reaccreditation process.
  5. Student Government Association (SGA) – Ryan Kim, President
    Mr. Kim reported SGA had its Live Voter education webinar on October 22, 2020, when Vice President of Anne Arundel County’s Board of Elections Tryphena Ellis-Johnson and Student Board Member and the Phi Theta Kappa Middle States Regional President Bri Barone shared a wide variety of information to prepare students to vote on Election Day. SGA has accepted eight new senators who will be working with the executive board to create ambitious events for the AACC community and beyond. SGA contacted all high schools in Anne Arundel County Public Schools and will partner with Student Ambassadors to showcase classes and opportunities offered at AACC to reduce the stigma of community college being referred to as 13th grade. In collaboration with the Office of Student Engagement, SGA’s Diversity Equity and Inclusion Committee is working on a veteran’s day video to honor military veterans. A pre-recorded video will be streamed live on AACC’s Facebook page. Lastly, SGA is working on virtual service learning and volunteering events which is being led by the Outreach Committee.
  6. Academic Forum/Council – Myra Dennis, President
    Ms. Dennis reported the Academic Forum had a special meeting in August to endorse and support the colleges focus on equity, diversity, inclusion, and anti-racism. As such, Academic Forum voted to have each committee include a goal related to equity, diversity, inclusion, and anti-racism and to revise committee structures and membership as needed. Ms. Dennis stated the Academic Standards Committee worked throughout the summer in consultation with Dr. Gavin to develop changes needed in a remote environment. The Educational Policies and Curriculum Committee continues to work and review proposals. The Nominating Committee is working to develop a process whereby adjunct faculty can be nominated and selected for either The Faculty Organization or Academic Forum committees where appropriate. The Academic Integrity Review Committee is working with Legal Counsel Erin Parker and Dr. Alycia Marshall to streamline and review policies and procedures related to academic integrity. Lastly, the development of an institutional review board is underway which will be included in the charter as a committee under Academic Forum.
  7. The Faculty Organization (TFO) – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President
    Dr. Tannenbaum reported The Faculty Organization (TFO) will be focusing on three key areas this year: Compensation, Evaluation and Participation. The Compensation Committee will be advocating for faculty raises. The committee will also advocate for the funding of an adjunct Lecturer III rank to retain dedicated and effective adjuncts and to reward them for the unpaid work many of them perform. An Ad Hoc Committee will be looking at how to evaluate faculty and award tenure. This will include making the evaluations process more meaningful, determining equitable criteria for placing faculty on the tenure track and awarding them tenure, and creating processes to follow when faculty do not meet expectations. Lastly, TFO will be focusing on ways to increase participation and strengthen faculty voices in the college’s shared governance processes.
  8. Professional and Support Staff Organization (PSSO) – No report
    There was no report from the Professional and Support Staff Organization.
  9. Administrative Staff Organization (ASO) – No report
    There was no report from the Administrative Staff Organization.
  10. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay reported that MACC hosted a Virtual Transfer Fair throughout October, which was open to all Maryland Community College students. AACC students had the opportunity to virtually meet with over 125 colleges and institutions from Maryland, out-of-state, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She shared that the MACC Board of Directors met on October 28, 2020, where the Board of Directors approved the 2021 MACC Legislative Agenda. The annual MACC Trustee Leadership Conference is scheduled Monday, January 25, 2021. This will be a virtual event. More information will be shared when it becomes available.

V.B.1. Approval of Closure of the Center for Cyber and Professional Training – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management

Ms. Beardmore stated leadership discussed in various board committee meetings the operational plan to close the Center for Cyber and Professional Training on the 3rd floor of a building located on Teague Road in Hanover, Maryland. Dr. Alycia Marshal, associate vice president of Learning & Academic Affairs and accreditation liaison officer for the college’s accreditation with Middle States Commission on Higher Education, recently advised that in order to comply with Middle States documentation requirements, the college should have the Board formally accept the recommendation to close the location. Ms. Beardmore stated the agenda item provides the documentation. She reported this information has been shared with the Board Facilities Committee who supported the plan to bring this item to the Board for approval. Ms. Beardmore pointed out the college has not been using the space for several months and does not intend to renew the lease. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to formalize the closure of the Center for Cyber and Professional Training on the 3rd floor of 7556 Teague Road, Hanover, Maryland and authorize the president or designee to submit the required substantive change documentation to Middle States by January 1, 2021.

V.B.2. Approval of Award of Degrees and Certificates – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning

Dr. Gavin asked the Board to approve the award of the associate degrees and certificates to be conferred by the president upon those students certified by the faculty to have fulfilled the requirements for a degree or certificate by the end of the fall 2020 semester. He stated the Board traditionally approves the award of degrees and certificates so that the action becomes part of the official college records prior to commencement. If the Board approves the main motion, the associate degrees and certificates will be awarded as appropriate. There is no fiscal implication. Dr. Johnson commented that the award is approved every semester. As such, he inquired if there was something which prevented a global approval to carry the motion from semester-to-semester. Dr. Gavin stated Legal Counsel Erin Parker was in the process of researching COMAR Regulations on that matter. The college would report back to the Board with Ms. Parker’s findings. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the award of the associate degrees and certificates to be conferred by the president upon those students certified by the faculty to have fulfilled the requirements for a degree or certificate by the end of the fall 2020 semester.

V.B.3. Approval of Contract for the Purchase of Two Autoclave Steam Sterilizers for Life Sciences – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning

Dr. Gavin asked the Board to approve the award of contract for the purchase of two autoclave steam sterilizers for Life Sciences for the Health and Life Sciences Building under construction on the Arnold Campus. He explained the purchase is for microcomputer-controlled autoclave single door steam sterilizers which will be used for sterilizing laboratory, research, and animal care supplies for Life Sciences. The contract will include delivery, installation, programming, maintenance and extended warranty. In accordance with the purchasing regulations established under the Maryland Annotated Code and Board policy, the college publicly advertised and solicited sealed competitive bids under request for bids HLSB-52-B. The college received a total of three responses and determined that two were deemed to be responsive and responsible. The bids were evaluated solely on cost, and Consolidated Sterilizer Systems is the lowest, most responsive and responsible bidder. If the Board approves the award of contract, the college will issue a purchase order for the equipment in December, with delivery to be scheduled for February 2021. The funding for this project will come from the Health and Life Sciences Building capital project. The approved total funding for this project is $116,952,000, $8,339,590 is available for this and other furniture, fixtures and equipment purchases; therefore, sufficient funds are available for this contract. Ms. Darrah referenced the second sentence of the first paragraph of the agenda item and wanted to know the period the contract would cover for academic support. Ms. Beardmore responded the sentence relates to instructional, academic support, administrative and student spaces in the Health & Life Sciences building, and that the steam sterilizers will be equipment for the Life Sciences program. Ms. Darrah asked for clarity on how the agenda item was written, specifically if the contract would include application training and if so, what the warranty period would be. Ms. Moore commented that purchasing this type of equipment generally comes with applications training with an expert who would train faculty. Ms. Beardmore stated the contract includes installation, delivery and the necessary programming. The warranty on the equipment is one year. Ms. Beardmore added that the college will research if the warranty includes application training. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the award of the contract for the purchase of two autoclave steam sterilizers to Consolidated Sterilizer Systems of Bellerica, MA in an amount not to exceed $115,762.

V.B.4. Approval of Award of Purchase for Adobe Student Option – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services

Dr. Patterson reported the agenda item was initially shared with the board in draft form late summer. As such, she asked the Board to approve the purchase of a subscription for Adobe Creative Cloud Student Option via the Adobe Higher Education Term License Agreement (ETLA). She stated the subscription will provide students engaged in Visual Arts courses with universal remote access to Adobe Creative Cloud applications and services. She explained in July 2019 and as ratified in September 2019, the Board approved the college’s participation in the Adobe Higher Education Term License Agreement (ETLA) for universal access to Adobe software and services for faculty, staff, and lab computers. That contract did not include the student option as the application features were readily available in labs on campus. As a result of COVID-19 and the transition to an online learning environment, the Board is being asked to approve this purchase. The purchase is a two (2) year commitment co-termed with the remaining term of the existing ELTA contract through August 26, 2022, with two annual payments. Estimated costs are outlined in Exhibit 1.

If the Board approves this purchase, the college will immediately issue a purchase order for the first year of the contract through August 26, 2021, in the amount of $49,332. Thereafter, an additional purchase order will be issued for the final year in August 2021 (estimated at $54,615) subject to continuing appropriation. As this contract is directly related to the disruption of campus operations and the transition to online instruction, the initial year’s costs are eligible for support from the institutional portion of the Coronavirus Aid Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act restricted funds. Dr. Patterson advised that the college is eligible for up to $2,157,673 to support qualifying costs; of which $49,332 has been allocated for this contract. The funding for the final year of the contract will come from the annual Information Services operating budget. The preliminary planning for the FY2022 budget has allocated $54,615 for this contract. Pending the approval of the FY2022 budget, and subject to continuing appropriation, sufficient funds are available for this contract.

Dr. Johnson commented that the contract is from November-October 2021, and the CARES Act funds must be used by June 2021. As such, he wanted to know if the numbers would be prorated during that period. Director of Technology Support Services Kathy Campbell confirmed the college would prorate the funds. Dr. Johnson stated if the numbers would be prorated, the numbers for the first and second year would have to adjust to be consistent. Ms. Beardmore stated the college anticipates receiving the extension for the CARES Act funding. Dr. Johnson asked if the college applies for an extension but does not receive it, would the college come back to the Board with a revision. Ms. Beardmore responded the college would apprise the Board in such case, but the main motion would not change. Dr. Patterson concurred stating the estimated cost would not change. Dr. Johnson agreed stating the fiscal implications would change but not the motion.

Ms. Darrah referred to the fourth paragraph of the agenda item and inquired how the college anticipated the 15% cap for full-time equivalent student access of Adobe Creative Cloud applications. Dr. Patterson responded the software is heavily used in high tech areas of Visual Arts. Ms. Darrah asked if a high demand existed on the Cloud application, what would happen when the 15% cap was reached. She was concerned that other students would be precluded from using the service in such cases. Ms. Moore inquired if the college had to provide the actual number of students who would be using the software, and if so, how the college would prove using 15%.

Ms. Darrah requested follow-up regarding her concern but did not want her inquiry to be an impediment to the vote or delay approving the contract for students. Ms. Beardmore stated payment on many memberships is based on enrollment. Thus, the contract is allocated based on the full-time equivalent enrollment. She believed there was a 15% minimum purchase but did not believe students would be cut off at the 15% cap. Dr. Lindsay stated the college will do further research and report back to the Board on their findings. 9 By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted to authorize the purchase of a subscription for the Adobe Creative Cloud Student Option for the two (2) year period through August 26, 2022, via the Adobe Higher Education Term License Agreement (ETLA) from Computer Intelligence Association, in Potomac, Maryland, with Ms. Darrah abstaining. In response to Ms. Darrah’s question pertaining to application training for Agenda Item V.B.3., Dr. Lindsay confirmed that application training is included in the Contract for the Purchase of Two Autoclave Steam Sterilizers for Life Sciences.

VII. NEW BUSINESS

VIII. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Chair Moore advised that the next board meeting will be December 8, 2020.

IX. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m.

Respectfully submitted, Dr. Dawn Lindsay Secretary-Treasurer

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on October 20, 2020, at 4:30 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to §3-305(b)(1)(i) and §3-305(b)(7) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code § 3- 305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, chair, Paula J. Darrah, vice chair, Bri Barone, Dr. James H. Johnson, Kathleen Johnson, Jerome W. Klasmeier, and Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr. The board members who voted to closed the meeting were present during closed session. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez joined the meeting at 4:33 p.m. Topics discussed included: The Board discussed a personnel matter. Erin Parker, General Counsel, entered the meeting by telephone at 5:35 p.m. provided legal advice regarding the process for considering a recommendation to take disciplinary action against a particular employee. Ms. Parker left the meeting at 5:37 p.m. The Board rendered a decision, which was communicated to the individual employee in writing in accordance with the College Manual. The meeting was adjourned at 5:38 p.m.

Dec. 8, 2020, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Kathleen Johnson; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Sandra Moore at 4 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting is being recorded pursuant to state law.

Ms. Moore asked Executive Assistant to the Board of Trustees Tracie Thomas to do a roll call for approval of the meeting agenda. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the December 8, 2020, Board of Trustees public session agenda.

II. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

Ms. Moore asked for a moment of silence to recognize and mourn the loss of Senator Paul Sarbanes, who was a fierce advocate for Maryland community colleges and higher education. Senator Sarbanes' dedication to Marylanders inspired the AACC Sarbanes Center for Career and Civic Engagement to meet the community’s needs and develop engaged citizens.

III. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Minutes of the November 10, 2020 Board of Trustees Public Session Meeting and December 3, 2020 Closed Session Meeting

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez moved to approve the November 10, 2020 Board of Trustees public session minutes; the motion was seconded by Dr. Johnson.

Dr. Johnson moved to approve the December 3, 2020 Board of Trustees Closed session minutes; the motion was seconded by Mr. Ulvila.

A roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, and the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the November 10, 2020 Board of Trustees public session minutes and December 3, 2020, Board of Trustees closed session meeting minutes.

IV. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Audit and Finance Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair - No report

B. Board Development Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair – No report

C. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula A. Darrah, Board Representative and Committee Chair

Ms. Darrah reported that the board policy oversight committee met on November 16 and December 3 to continue its review of board policies, making recommendations for revisions, adding new policies, and removing those that are out of date or no longer needed. Four information items are presented to the Board for review.

The committee is recommending the removal of the Copyright policy, which was approved by the Board of Trustees in December 1988 and revised January 2012. This policy is a statement of law and the committee is recommending that its policies for the board not be merely a statement or a restatement of law as a best practice. Copyright is covered in the Board's intellectual property policy. Because this is a board approved policy, the committee is recommending that the board approve the deletion and removal of this policy from the board policy manual.

The committee recommends updating three policies: Nepotism; Antiracism, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; and Drug and Alcohol Prohibitions. The informational items and exhibits for those policies, again, directing your attention to the board materials on the agenda item 4C, Number 2 through C, Number 4.

The board currently has an approved nepotism policy, which was adopted October 1999, and revised May 2009. The committee recommends updating this policy to include students, and provide certain definitions, which will assist for clarity for better understanding of the policy.

The board approved the policy on equity, diversity and inclusion on March 10, 2020. The committee is recommending updating the policy to include antiracism, definitions for all concepts, and a statement that supports the efforts to promote antiracism and achieve diversity, equity and inclusion for students, faculty and staff.

The board currently has a Drug and Alcohol Prohibitions policy, which was adopted May 1994 and revised May 2010. The committee recommends updating the language in this policy, clarifying prohibitions, exceptions and possible sanctions.

These four policies will be brought back for full board approval and consideration at the January 12th public session. Ms. Darrah concluded her report by noting the hardworking members of this board committee that met during a very busy holiday season. She appreciates their efforts and wishes them the best for the holiday.

D. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair - No report

E. Board Facilities Committee – Jerome W. Klasmeier, Committee Chair - Report

Mr. Klasmeier reported that the facilities committee met via Zoom on November 19 to discuss procurements, the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the Health and Life Sciences building, the Riverhawk Recovery plan, and future meeting dates.

Regarding procurements, the committee reviewed the list of future procurements along with drafts of six procurements, which are on our agenda tonight. The committee agreed that presenting the procurements related to the Health and Life Sciences project in the group would be appropriate and more efficient, and save some time.

Regarding the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the college continues to work with the architect, GBA Architects and the construction manager, Whiting-Turner, and the college's internal team to redesign the project towards the budget goal. The big changes in the design involve the elimination of a general purpose classroom and the entrance, with the size of the building moving from 14,484 square feet to 11,286 square feet. The good news is that all instructional labs remain in the facility and they became slightly larger. The Clauson Center is scheduled to be substantially complete in October with classes starting in January 2022.

The Health and Life Sciences building project continues to be on schedule within budget and on track to attain LEED Gold certification. The Board participated in a virtual tour on the morning of November 19. Substantial completion for the project is March 28, 2021 and the moving process is scheduled to begin on June 1, 2021.

Regarding the Riverhawk Recovery plan, the committee was updated on the college's plans as to what the college's new paradigm will look like as we emerge resilient in the post-COVID environment. The college also plans on aligning an update to the facilities master plan with the post pandemic planning work.

F. Human Resources Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair – No report

There was no report from the Human Resources Committee.

G. Report of Trustees’ Liaison to the AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.,Lead Liaison

Ms. Barone read a letter from a student at AACC. The student was honored to receive the New Annapolitan Scholarship and expressed her sincere gratitude for this contribution toward her education. The scholarship will help her accomplish her educational goal of earning a bachelor's degree in education. The student, who is a wife, mother, and veteran of the United States Army, has always dreamt of furthering her education and working with at-risk youth. This scholarship has lightened her financial burden and inspired her to reciprocate this generosity in the future.

Mr. Ulvila reported that as of November 30, 2020, the fundraising total for the current fiscal year was approximately $562,000 in gifts and commitments and total campaign revenue just over $8.63 million. As far as fundraising activities, the AACC Foundation recently received a $15,000 gift from a local family foundation that supports workforce development scholarships. As the foundation continues to raise funds towards the construction of the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the workforce development scholarships will play an important role in recruiting and retaining students in this field of study.

At the AACC Foundation Board of Directors meeting held on November 18, the board approved a motion to contract with a firm, Grenzebach, Gilmer & Associates to facilitate a strategic Page 4 of 12 planning process. GG&A will work to develop a three-year strategic plan for the AACC Foundation with input from the foundation board, college leadership and members of the AACC Board of Trustees. This was an important step for the foundation to build on the successes and lessons learned from the current campaign, and is critical to the foundation's future.

Mr. Ulvila asked Vollie Melson, Executive Director of the AACC Foundation, to present a naming opportunity for consideration. Mr. Melson reported that Janet and Jim Clauson would like to make a generous gift to name the space currently known as Laboratory #4, Electrical in the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades. The space would be named the Tabor Kristiansen Electrics Lab, in memory of Janet Clauson's mother and her family. Tabor and Kristiansen were her mother's maiden name and married name.

In accordance with the procedures for naming college properties, programs and positions, the Board is being asked to consider a naming opportunity on the basis of a monetary donation as outlined in Section 2D. The Clausons have been very generous donors to the college, as the center is named with their lead gift in the campaign. They are deeply committed to advancing workforce development programs and education in our community through Anne Arundel Community College. The Clausons were instrumental in introducing the college to the late Philip and Carole Ratcliffe years ago, and have been regular advisors to programs over the years. Mrs. Clauson is a lifelong learner. She's been taking classes regularly at our college since 1983. In terms of the fiscal implications associated with this naming, any signage would be paid for through donor contributions raised through the AACC Foundation and within the overall project budget for the Clauson Center. By motion Mr. Ulvila, and seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the full board approved the naming Laboratory #4, Electrical in the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades.

V. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay was pleased to report that she attended AACC’s Big Idea viewing party and award ceremony on November 19. This annual competition hosted by the Entrepreneurial Studies Institute invited students to pitch their ideas via video. Online judges reviewed and scored the submissions and then winners were announced. This year's winners featured food trucks and programs supporting veterans and healthy eating in low-income areas, and plans for an LGBTQ tack room in Annapolis. Dr. Lindsay shared that AACC Strategic Communications was named one of the winners in the Graphic Design USA 57th Anniversary Graphic Design Awards competition. AACC was recognized for its work with the Wingspan magazine and work from home tips. Dr. Lindsay reported AACC's faculty and staff, through the Office of Student Engagement, donated 656 pounds of food for the community. The Riverhawk Recovery team continues to meet to continue planning for the future. The college is currently in stage two of our recovery program. Given the county and state's current numbers, AACC’s recovery plan continues to place the safety of students and workforce first. Page 5 of 12 After receiving input from the college community, followed by a thorough committee review, the college has decided to not hire a Chief Equity Diversity and Inclusion Officer based on the initial pool of candidates. Dr. Lindsay reported that she will provide the board with an update on next steps in that process. Dr. Lindsay reported that this pandemic has changed how work is done, providing support to students, while balancing home and work lives. She is proud of the Anne Arundel Community College community for being resilient and for their dedication to work and students and perseverance during these times.
  2. Health and Wellness Report – Melissa Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management and Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Ms. Beardmore and Dr. Patterson shared updates on some of programs for employees and students as wellness and employee engagement go together. The Human Resources team is taking the lead in ensuring programming has been developed to support the workforce. Human Resources provides regular virtual check-ins for employees for updates and provides the opportunity for faculty and staff to ask questions. They also provide professional development sessions for working parents to help them navigate the challenges with supporting their children's learning while working remotely, and for those who are still working on campus. The Human Resources team recently offered a stress management workshop. Ms. Beardmore reported that Human Resources' newsletter, The Resource, offers tips, information, and updates for the college community. The college offers Riverhawks at Home, a page that provides a dynamic way for employees to connect, share pictures, support each other along with virtual backgrounds that are seasonal and also represent the college community. There is also the podcast series, Redefine U, and the Strategic Communications team has developed fun engaging opportunities to connect virtually. Dr. Patterson reported that Health and Wellness is an important component of AACC’s strategic plan. From the student perspective, AACC wants to provide excellence, innovation, engagement, and resources with comprehensive health services that focus on students’ needs. Dr. Patterson discussed a few highlights in student services, student outreach, and sexual violence prevention. Some of the student services provided by Health and Wellness include support with health insurance and low cost referrals to assist students for their specific healthcare needs, such as nicotine cessation. Other student services include sexual health related to contraceptives, pregnancy testing, and STD testing. Substance abuse recovery and support programs are offered through the collegiate recovery center, as well as substance abuse education programs. Dr. Patterson reported student services is aligned very closely with the county's efforts in managing the opioid epidemic. AACC students created a very powerful video on opioids where they share their stories with addiction and their struggles and we share that video with students, as well as departments. It is posted on the MyAACC portal. She also noted that student services offers Narcan and Narcan training, over the counter medications, blood pressure testing, a stress room and lactation room. Page 6 of 12 Dr. Patterson noted students’ health is important and student services offers programs, such as alcohol education and responsible consumption, as well as overall physical, mental and emotional well-being of students. There are different programs on how to stay healthy in this COVID environment and times that a student can contact a nurse during the week and ask any questions. One of AACC’s major initiatives is around sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. AACC has a $300,000 Department of Justice grant, which is a renewable grant on sexual violence and prevention in partnership with Baltimore Washington Medical Center, as well as the state's attorney's office dating and domestic violence services. AACC wants to have a coordinated effort to ensure victim safety, provide services for victims, and support efforts to hold offenders accountable. Dr. Patterson noted goals to establish prevention and education programs, conduct trainings, as well as general work on behalf of faculty, students and staff as it relates to intervention. Dr. Patterson noted that Beth Mays, the manager of the Health and Wellness, as well as Suzanne Boyer, Executive Director of Human Resources have been taking the lead on a lot of this work in this COVID environment, and doing an exceptional job. Ms. Moore commented that the work being done in the health and wellness arena is just remarkable, and shows the college cares about the employees just as much as the students, and provides them resources they may not be able to get anywhere else. Mr. Klasmeier asked Dr. Patterson if anyone was looking at the long term effects on the students when they are subjected to the distance learning versus in-classroom learning. Dr. Patterson commented that there have been a number of conversations about mental health related to students, and how we go about addressing that. In addition to the Health and Wellness Center, there is a counseling center that Beth Mays works very closely with, dealing with mental health issues. There have been conversations with the faculty as well, making sure the faculty are aware of the resources available. If a student has a specific issue, they are given a direct referral to the counseling center. In terms of long-term effects, it will definitely take some additional work and study. Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez thanked and complimented Dr. Patterson on the presentation and asked in terms of wellness, is there a way that the college is monitoring the progress of people, and how that monitoring supports the outcomes of the program? Dr. Patterson replied that the college does not have anything specific for that. There are some student surveys and they do receive feedback from the students. It may not be as comprehensive as a particular study of who has used the center and then compare that to outcomes related to retention. The college is not quite there yet. But in terms of general information and feedback about the services and the services the students are using and what they would like to see, are the types of feedback the college receives. Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez commended Dr. Patterson as this is working towards that goal and the college is getting information from the students in a way that in the future, can be used for innovation in wellness.
  3. Monthly Accreditation Report – Dr. Alycia Marshall, Steering Committee
    Dr. Marshall reported that the steering committee met on Friday, November 13 as the completion of the self-study design is nearly complete. The steering committee will continue to gather input from the president, vice presidents and all of the constituency groups, as well as the Student Government Association. Page 7 of 12 Dr. Marshall reported that in spring 2021, Middle States Vice President, Dr. Robert Bonfiglio will schedule a virtual visit to discuss AACC’s self-study design and the progress in the reaccreditation process done so far. She noted that he will also meet with Dr. Lindsay, the vice presidents, the steering committee, and possibly constituency group leaders and students as well. The steering committee will have a final itinerary to share closer to that time. The steering committee continues to receive professional development and organize future logistics for the accreditation process.
  4. Student Government Association (SGA) – Ryan Kim, President
    Mr. Kim stated that at the Second General Forum, which consisted of student leaders, concerns were expressed that some clubs were not able adjust to an online environment, which may result in clubs being inactive. Another concern was difficulty in advertising club events. SGA provided tips on different ways of advertising through social media, such as The Nest. Mr. Kim provided updates on SGA events. The high school project, which is a collaboration with Student Ambassadors, will discuss community college stigma, student experiences, and resources offered by AACC, such as scholarships, supplemental instructions, assistance from advisors, and choosing majors. The club competition event which is designed to engage club membership will be held in early spring after the virtual club fair. Mr. Kim noted that the fall virtual club fair was a successful event with over 120 students participating. Mr. Kim reported updates on some projects from the Outreach Committee, such as sending holiday cards to nursing homes in December and a cooking night on December 3. The Campus Advisory Board is organizing a pet wear competition right before finals week to spread the joy of seeing pets in costumes. The finance committee's FAFSA and scholarship workshops along with guests from the Office of Financial Aid had over a hundred sign-ups combined between the two workshops.
  5. Academic Forum/Council – Myra Dennis, President
    Ms. Dennis reported some highlights from Academic Forum. The Teaching and Learning Committee introduced a Designs for Learning and Equity Fellowships Program focusing on faculty work in their curriculum on equity, inclusion, diversity and antiracism. They are accepting applications. This committee works with the League for Innovation Excellence Awards. Ms. Dennis reported that a total of eight full-time faculty, two part-time faculty and four staff will be receiving the League for Innovation Excellence Awards, and a video presentation featuring the winners, will be shown in the spring. Ms. Dennis noted updates from the Committee on eLearner Success. The committee will determine a plan for the use of Zoom as a learning platform for class instruction, as well as using Honorlock, which is a test proctoring system. Ms. Dennis reported that the Forum is working on revisions to the Forum Charter.
  6. The Faculty Organization (TFO) Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President – No report
  7. Professional and Support Staff Organization (PSSO) – Anne Bashore, President
    Ms. Bashore reported that the Community Service Committee, which includes members from the Administrative Staff Organization and The Faculty Organization coordinated the annual Thanksgiving food drive to support HelpLink and students facing food insecurity. For the first time this year, this included the ability to donate through Amazon. Ms. Bashore reported that they collected a total of 656 pounds of food, which amounted to 57 Thanksgiving themed boxes provided to AACC students and their families. Ms. Bashore noted the help from the community service committee, the community service committee co-chair, Pat Shoemaker and the basic needs coordinator in the Office of Student Engagement, Caitlin Silver.
  8. Administrative Staff Organization (ASO) – Dr. Danny M. Hoey, Jr., President New ASO President
    Dr. Hoey reported that ASO is working to find some ways to support administrative staff during COVID. ASO crafted a survey and will be collecting that information and providing some solutions to Dr. Lindsay and the vice presidents. Dr. Lindsay thanked the constituent groups’ leadership. Dr. Lindsay noted that she approached the leadership and asked for assistance on how to provide additional support to staff and faculty. All three presidents of the constituency groups have taken that task back to their constituency groups and are working on some suggestions for the leadership team. Dr. Lindsay mentioned that Dr. Tannenbaum shared some suggestions from The Faculty Organization.
  9. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay reported the Commission on the Future of Maryland's Community Colleges was held on Thursday, December 3, in which invited stakeholders participated in a series of focus groups that were facilitated by the Maryland Community College presidents, seeking input and guidance to develop the next strategic plan. MACC is also preparing for the opening of the 2021 legislative session. Opening day of the 442nd session is January 13, 2021. Dr. Lindsay reminded Board members that the annual MACC Trustee Leadership Conference is scheduled for Monday, January 25, 2-4pm. It will be a virtual event and more information will follow.

B. Action Items

Approval of the Award of the Contract for Data Communications – Dr. Felicia Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services

Dr. Patterson asked the Board of Trustees to approve the purchase of data communications equipment and maintenance to replace existing equipment that is reaching the end of its service life. The college's data communications infrastructure, which is fiber cabling, is the backbone to providing a multitude of services to students, faculty, and staff, and to the delivery of supportive instruction and administrative needs, this upgrade will position the college with the ability to add additional features, security, and functionality in the future to further enhance the overall user experience.

The data communications equipment comprises two major components. First is the network switching equipment and data closets on each floor of every building and second is the data center router equipment. Network switching equipment receives service and support for a period Page 9 of 12 of five years from the manufacturer’s end of sales date. The original equipment was installed in 2013 and has been in place for over seven years. In 2023, this equipment will reach the manufacturers end of service life.

Through the IT capital project, the college is taking a proactive approach and will begin the multi-phase process of replacing this equipment over the span of three years from 2021 to 2023. Without this replacement, the college will have unsupported equipment that could impact critical operations, security enhancements, and academic functions. This project was solicited as a minimum $1.6 million contract for the first phase of our data communications replacement equipment and maintenance program within the IT capital project. The total estimate for the program is approximately $5 million over multiple phases through December, 2023, subject to future appropriation.

The college requested quotes from vendors who hold a contract with Maryland Education Enterprise Consortium or MEEC. The college received a total of 11 responses and determined that eight were deemed to be responsive and responsible. The firm's quotes are included in the agenda item. If the Board of Trustees approves the award contract, the college will start the process of issuing purchase orders in December for each sub-phase of the first phase of the project. These phases will be coordinated to minimize the disruption to students, faculty, and staff.

The funding for the first phase of this program will come from the FY21 IT capital project, which has an unencumbered balance of $1,750,485 available. Therefore, sufficient funds are available for the first phase of this program estimated at 1.6 million. The college is seeking Board of Trustees approval for an amount not to exceed 1.7 million to allow for minor variances in room configurations as the college's assessment team implements the replacement program based on individual building configurations.

Trustee Darrah asked for further explanation of the implementation plan. It says college will start the process of issuing purchase orders in December, and for each sub-phase of the first phase. She was not sure how that works in terms of what was described in the materials. While she understands, the overall implication and phases, she is not sure she understands sub-phase of a first phase.

Andrew Little, Associate Vice President, Learning Resources Management responded that intention is that the college will issue an individual purchase order as it moves through the building replacement. The college did not necessarily want to issue a purchase order for $1.6 million from the start, so the college will issue purchase orders as it continues to move through the project.

Trustee Darrah responded that she understood that but she was lost trying to match the first phase and sub-phases with the amounts in the proposal. Mr. Little explained that what the college is asking the Board to approve a total contract value of $1.6 million with an authorization to spend up to $1.7 million. The firms bid on an example configuration of a building, and then gave the college fixed unit pricing associated with that example. As the college configures a building, it will issue a purchase order for very specific equipment, and that purchase order will align with the fixed unit pricing in the exhibit, but that is unknown at this time and will be until the building is configured with equipment needs. Page 10 of 12 By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and by a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board approved the Board approved the award of contract for data communications replacement equipment and maintenance, with Ms. Darrah abstaining.

1. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of Health and Life Science Furniture – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management

2. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of Operative Experience Simulators – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management

3. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of Laerdal Manikins – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management

4. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of Nursing Anne Simulator – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management

5. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of SOMSO Models – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management

Ms. Beardmore reported that V.B.II to V.B.VI are for furniture or equipment for the new Health and Life Sciences Building. In the fiscal implication section for each item and also in the exhibit to the summary item that the president mentioned, there is a declining balance of funds available if approved for each item.

Ms. Beardmore noted there is $8.2 million available for these items and after all five are approved, that would leave a balance of $4.9 million for other furniture, fixtures and equipment purchases. The Health and Life Sciences Building will house the college's health sciences and biology programs funded by both the county and the state. Ms. Beardmore noted, as heard from the facilities committee chair, the project is on time and on budget, scheduled to open in August 2021. Faculty and staff will start moving into the building in late spring, early summer. Starting with agenda item VB.II, the first item is for furniture for the building.

Ms. Beardmore reported that AACC is required by state law to use MCE for eligible furniture items. It is state law that limits AACC to use this one vendor by virtue of that state funding. MCE is the prison industry arm of the state division of corrections and from their annual report, "The mission of MCE is to provide structured employment and training activities for offenders in order to improve employability upon release, to enhance safety and security, to reduce prison idleness, to produce quality goods and services, and to be financially self-supporting state agency." If MCE can provide an item that we need under state law, the college has to purchase it from them unless it receives a waiver. This agenda item is for a little under $2.4 million, which does include an allowance of 10% for estimated field adjustments. The contract does include delivery and installation of the items where appropriate.

The building is designed to include informal learning spaces for students with soft seating. The facilities master plan identified a deficit in informal learning spaces for students where students can study, connect with other students or faculty and/or wait between classes. The beautiful first floor lecture hall will have front row tables and all the chairs from MCE. In the faculty and staff office space, modular furniture will be purchased.

Ms. Beardmore reported that the new building includes simulation lab spaces, places where the medical working environment is simulated to provide students as close to a real life experience as possible and the next three equipment purchases support that simulation lab experience. Item V.B.III is a sole source purchase for two pieces of equipment, one source has been Page 11 of 12 identified to meet those needs for our students and integrates with our B-Line software. The college is purchasing the Real Mom 2.0 and the Trauma Care Female Simulator which are very realistic pieces of equipment, therefore they are expensive.

Ms. Beardmore reported on the next item for V.B.IV, Laerdal manikins. This is another sole source procurement because they are the only ones that sell the material selected to benefit the academic program. The sole source decision has been reviewed and approved by the college's director of procurement and contracting. This purchase is for the Laerdal manikins, including one each of the SimMan Essential, SimMom, SimNewborn, SimBaby, SimJunior, and two SimMan 3Gs.

Ms. Beardmore referred to agenda item V.B.V, the Nursing Anne Simulator. This procurement, has two vendors one for Pocket Nurse, and Laerdal is the sole provider of installation education, technical services, and support for the simulators. Pocket Nurse is a leading manufacturer and distributor of medical supplies and equipment for simulation and healthcare education, and integrates perfectly with our B-Line software. The college will be buying four Nursing Anne Simulators which will be located in both the nursing labs and the nursing skill labs to be used by the nursing students during practice labs. Ms. Beardmore notes they may also move them to the simulation suite as needed.

Item V.B.VI, Somso models. The Somso brand provides anatomical, botanical, and zoological models that were used in our life sciences laboratories in the building. The college is buying eight of the leg with muscle, which will cost a little over $17,000, one neuro anatomy head and 11 head and neck muscles.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and by a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the full board approved the award of contracts for the purchase of furniture and equipment for the Health and Life Science building as described in agenda item V.B.II through V.B.VI.

6. Approval of Award of Degrees and Certificates for Academic Year Ending June 2020 – .Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning

After consulting with legal counsel, the college was advised to follow a protocol to attain ratification from the Board after the actual awarding of the degrees and certificates. Dr. Gavin reported that this can be done annually, and that the Board should ratify rather than approve degrees and certificates.

By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Dr. Johnson to approve, and by a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the full board approved the award ratification of degrees and certificates for academic year ending June 2020.

VII. NEW BUSINESS

VIII. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Chair Moore advised that the next board meeting will be January 12, 2021.

IX. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m.

Respectfully submitted, Dr. Dawn Lindsay Secretary-Treasurer

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on December 3, 2020, at 5:00 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to section 3-305(b)(2) and 3-305(b)(7) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code Section 3-305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, Paula J. Darrah, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Jerome W. Klasmeier, Lawrence W. Ulvila, and Briana Barone. Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez arrived at 5:27 p.m. Dr. Dawn Lindsay, Vollie Melson, Melissa Beardmore, Dr. Michael Gavin, Dr. Felicia Patterson, Erin Parker, and Tracie Thomas were also present. Mr. Melson left at 5:23 p.m. Topics discussed included: The Board discussed matters regarding the privacy and reputation of individuals under consideration for a naming opportunity, legal advice regarding pending and potential litigation; and discussion of a personnel matter regarding a particular employee. The meeting began at 5:10 p.m. and ended at 5:58 p.m.

Jan. 19, 2021, Board of Trustees Special Meeting Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Sandra Moore at 5 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting is being recorded pursuant to state law.

II. ROLL CALL

Ms. Moore asked for a moment of silence to recognize and mourn the loss of Senator Paul Sarbanes, who was a fierce advocate for Maryland community colleges and higher education. Senator Sarbanes' dedication to Marylanders inspired the AACC Sarbanes Center for Career and Civic Engagement to meet the community’s needs and develop engaged citizens.

III. VOTE TO CLOSE MEETING

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved to close the open session.

III. MEETING RECONVENE

The special meeting of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 6:34 p.m.

Action Items

A. Approval of Minutes from the October 13, 2020, October 20, 2020, and December 3, 2020 Board of Trustees Closed Session Minutes

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the meeting minutes for the October 13, 2020, October 2020, and December 3, 2020 closed session meetings.

1. Health & Life Sciences Building - Vollie Melson, Executive Director, Anne Arundel Community College Foundation

Mr. Melson asked the Board to consider naming the space currently known as perch, in the Health and Life Sciences building. Based on a monetary donation and as delineated in our procedures for naming college properties, Ms. Patricia Brady wishes to name this space in honor of her parents, who are deceased. Ms. Brady, who has been an employee of the college for 15 years and is the director of the Physical Therapy Assistant Program, has been a regular donor to the AACC Foundation. Her parents’ careers exemplified service to this community. Her father served for over 20 years in the United States Navy and her mother was a nurse. Page 2 of 4 If the naming is approved, signage in this particular space will note that the space is dedicated in honor of Robert and Ellen Brady and there are no fiscal implications as the donor contribution will be used to cover any associated costs. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Barone, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the naming of the space in the Health and Life Sciences Building.

B. Informational Item

1. CARES Act Presentation – Andrew P. Little, Associate Vice President for Learning Resources Management

Mr. Little provided a high level overview of the CARES Act. When the stimulus funding was released for higher education, there was a lot of misinformation about what the funds could be used for. The bills were originally written to allow for offsetting revenue losses. However, when the final regulations were released, they were much more restrictive than originally planned. The funding could only be used for costs associated with a transition to online instruction as a result of the disruption of campus operations due to Covid-19.

A stimulus funding team was established, which analyzed the funds that were received. That team still exists at the college, and it is continuing to review requests from the college community.

The team was charged by the president and vice presidents to look at how AACC could use the CARES Act funds to move the institution forward in a strategic direction. The team tried to focus on those investments that would help move the college where it needed to be in the next 5 to 10 years. To be eligible for the institutional funds, the college had to utilize 50% of the funds towards emergency aid to students. With the 11/30 projections, the college had fully dispersed all the student funds which made AACC eligible for the institutional share.

Information around the second round of stimulus funding may actually broaden that timeline, a little bit further. This schedule is just intended to show you that the college is right on target.

Strategic Investment – one of the budget priorities that was stated as the college closed out FY20 and was moving into budget planning for FY22, was becoming the premier online institution in the state of Maryland.

The Board of Trustees approved the online exam proctoring service, Honorlock, at a previous meeting. This is an example of what the college is investing in that has allowed us to maintain academic integrity as the college started to administer exams remotely. The College wanted to use funds to improve the experience and outcomes for our students.

Technology investments – specific cameras and high performance computers. A contract was issued to allow for Adobe cloud services for students at home and those in high demand programs in the digital arts. To support students in this remote environment, AACC set-up a laptop loaner program/mobile hotspot loaner program for students in collaboration with the bookstore and library. Additionally, the college provides virtual labs kits for students.

A chat bot was implemented that expands the college’s availability for students beyond what it would typically do in a face-to-face environment as well as some virtual desktop piloting. The college also invested in some technology and equipment to facilitate remote services, whether it was headsets for the call center or laptops to support interactions with the workforce as well as our students.

The college received an update around Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, sometimes referred to as CARES II, which is the next round of stimulus funding for higher education. The team will analyze the funding sources, making sure that it will be deployed within the guidelines. Until the final regulations from the Department of Education are released, the team is monitoring the situation, but the college is very hopeful that this will be another significant investment for our students’ benefit as well as for the institution as we move into closing out FY2021 and into FY2022.

Mr. Ulvila asked if Mr. Little had a rough idea of how much would be available in the second round of funding. Mr. Little responded that it looks to be more than the first round, and while the college has received some preliminary calculations from various organizations, AACC has not received its official notification for all the funds yet.

Mr. Klasmeier asked if these additional sources of funds will be reflected in the next budget submission. Mr. Little responded that they would be reflected in the auxiliary enterprise and restricted funds. They are restricted funds, just like financial aid and other grant programs and outside of the operating budget. AACC has three main funds within its budget submission, the operating fund, capital fund and auxiliary, enterprise and restricted fund. Mr. Klasmeier asked for confirmation that the budget office would not be confused with the additional funds and Mr. Little confirmed that it would not, as these would be restricted funds. Right now, the college is within its projections for FY2021 and if need be, it would request 4th quarter transfer appropriation to increase that authorization. Generally for restricted funds, it is a relatively easy request, as the college has a contract that shows that it is going to get the funds from the federal government. There has not been any issues with getting it approved in the past; it is just a matter of identifying it and bringing it forward.

Mr. Klasmeier stated that it was clear that the college did what it could to maximize the technology that was needed to deal with the consequences of COVID-19. He asked Dr. Dawn Lindsay if there was any way of knowing what the impact has been on the students.

Dr. Lindsay responded that there has been tremendous change. The college provided laptops and equipment, so they could work remotely at home. Mr. Little added that there was a significant amount of direct aid to students. Students registered for the spring term of 2020 were the first to receive the emergency aid, and they received $700-$800 to help deal with the disruption that was taking place. AACC continued a similar program in the summer and fall terms, and with the next round of funding, it should continue into spring 2021 as well.

Dr. Lindsay asked Mr. Little to discuss how the money was prorated for full-time based on number of credits taken. Mr. Little explained how the direct aid to students was determined. The regulations required the college to take some factors into account, so there was consideration of credit load and need, although it was not necessary. The college also designed a process for students who did not receive the funds to file an application for appeal.

Dr. Lindsay commented to Mr. Klasmeier that she has received a couple of calls and texts from students asking if they could cash their checks. The students were not expecting to have an Page 4 of 4 opportunity to receive several hundred dollars, and they were very grateful. Some were in disbelief as they did not believe it was real and thought it was some kind of fraudulent scam.

V. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Ms. Moore reminded the trustees that the Board Budget Workshop will be on February 11, 2021 at 8:30 a.m. and the next public session meeting would be February 23, 2021.

IX. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:56 p.m.

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on January 19, 2021, at 5:00 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to section 3-305(b)(2), (b)(7) and (b)(8) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code Section 3-305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, Paula J. Darrah, Jerome W. Klasmeier, Lawrence W. Ulvila, Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, and Briana Barone. Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., arrived at 5:27 p.m. Dr. Dawn Lindsay, Vollie Melson, Melissa Beardmore, Dr. Michael Gavin, Dr. Felicia Patterson, Erin Parker, and Tracie Thomas were also present. Mr. Melson left at 5:16 p.m. Ms. Beardmore, Dr. Gavin, Dr. Patterson and Ms. Thomas left at 5:36 p.m. Topics discussed included: The Board discussed matters regarding the privacy and reputation of individuals under consideration for a naming opportunity, legal advice regarding pending and potential litigation; and discussion of a personnel matter regarding a particular employee. The meeting began at 5:03 p.m. and ended at 6:14 p.m.

Feb. 11, 2021, Board Budget Workshop Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 8:36 a.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting is being recorded pursuant to state law.

Vice President Melissa Beardmore welcomed trustees and attendees, and thanked the Budget Committee, Andrew Little and Sue Callahan for time and effort preparing for this meeting. Ms. Beardmore noted that two documents were provided to the trustees including a packet with background materials, which would be referred to by page number during the presentation.

Ms. Beardmore reminded the trustees that all materials and data are in draft form until the board formally approves the budget at its meeting on February 23, 2021.

I. Update on FY 2021

Ms. Beardmore stated that this is the second budget in support of the current strategic plan. The theme for developing the budget over the past several years has been reallocation of existing resources in support of goals - a key role in funding solutions in support of the strategic plan. The budget shows about $3.1 million in ongoing reallocation investments in support of strategic initiatives as the college moves into the new strategic plan.

Vice President Michael Gavin discussed the outcomes of budgetary investments. Dr. Gavin stated that the percentage of minority students, as a cohort, who are gaining awards has increased, but gaps remain in equity and completion. Significant national recognition has been received for this work. Dr. Gavin explained that data are reviewed regularly to ensure that the institution continues to succeed in its equity agenda. Where needed, interventions have been done with excellent results. Additionally, operational work is being completed with regards to equity, diversity and inclusion.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez asked about the interventions for minorities. Dr. Gavin shared an example of a major intervention in Learning which has had significant success. Beginning in 2017, a Model Course Initiative was introduced where three faculty had the opportunity to participate in a professional development program to learn about Critical Race Theory as well as how to approach learning in different populations such as veterans, gender or sexual identity, among others. These faculty learned to approach course content with a focus on how to reach students of different backgrounds. This was a year-long program in which faculty looked at course outcomes and course content while continuing to develop as excellent teachers in regards to equity, diversity and inclusion. In specific high enrollment courses among African American students, achievement gaps have narrowed or been eliminated. Collectively, twenty-five high enrollment courses have gone through this process, touching around 13,000 people each semester. Additionally, there has been significant work done in Learner Support Services on equity, diversity and inclusion from outreach to students to focusing on particular high schools where access may not be provided. There have been a number of interventions by faculty as well as Learner Support Services especially focused on those high enrollment courses.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez recognized the work being done and shared her wish to see more minority students coming into the college, particularly Latinos and veterans. 2 AACC, like other community colleges in the nation, has experienced a decline in enrollment, however, AACC has not experienced a decline in completion.Dr. Gavin noted this as a point of pride for the college. This is the result of intentional work being done to ensure students are achieving their goals.

Dr. Gavin noted that the college’s percentage of minority population has increased. The college is honoring its promise that minority students graduate at a similar percentage that mirrors enrollment. Dr. Gavin explained this as a reflection of the supports systems put into place based on what has been learned about equity, diversity and inclusion.

Dr. Gavin stated the college has created meaningful credentials leading to well-paying jobs. Through completion based strategic planning, students are not remaining in community college any longer than needed. The English and math departments have focused on streamlining curriculum without sacrificing rigor, reducing the time it takes to complete the sequence. For community colleges, developmental education is an enrollment and revenue stream. When the amount of time a student spends in development education is reduced, there is a significant impact on FTE and revenue. The data show that the impact of this work has resulted in greater retaining of students. The college is seeing excellent graduation rates among Hispanic/Latinx students.

Dr. Gavin shared the creation of a new planning assessment and continuous improvement model that is pervasive throughout the institution. As a result of collaboration among the three divisions, and under the direction of Dr. Lindsay, the college has defined units where the work is aligned to the strategic plan, which can be assessed in terms of outcomes and financial acumen with regards to what the units are supposed to be doing. Dr. Gavin concluded that this model allows for collecting information yearly as to productivity and for assessing whether or not that productivity is aligned with the costs being put towards it. It may also help to understand where more resources may be needed to continue excellent work.

Vice President Beardmore addressed the work of the Administrative Services Review, which began in the spring of 2020 with the goal to consider how to align resources in support of the strategic plan. Working with a local firm which conducted the project, short term savings options were developed while maintaining a long-term view to greater efficiencies. This work was planned before COVID and has become more important than ever, ensuring that the college is a resilient institution. The findings will help move the mission of the college forward in a changed world. The firm took a dive into current administrative functions with the goal to maintain current service levels at a reduced cost, enhance services as appropriate, and address existing service pain points. The result is an efficiency roadmap towards improving services, making investments, and generating efficiencies into the future.

Vice President Beardmore reviewed recommendations in progress and stated that some are the result of creating greater efficiencies such as centralizing services and result in savings while others, such as creating the Vice President of Information Technology position, reflect necessary investments to support the strategic direction of the college. These recommendations will continue to be on the Board Budget Committee agenda and updates will be shared regarding progress. This will be a multi-year project as the college moves into implementation.

Ms. Moore asked for further explanation of the last bullet on slide 18 of the presentation “Increase average span from 3.7-4.0.” Ms. Beardmore explained that this refers to ‘Spans and Layers’, an efficiency measure of workforce which looks at how many staff does a supervisor supervise. In order to create greater efficiencies, consideration will be given to benchmark standards which look at these numbers and help determine where efficiencies can be 3 implemented. These changes can affect costs as well as increase the effectiveness of leadership.

Mr. Little explained that he would be giving an update to the last presentation given on January 19th regarding additional funding coming under the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act. Current estimates indicate that the college is eligible to receive a little over $7 million in institutional funding as well as a doubling of student emergency aid funds of up to $4.3 million.

Dr. Johnson asked for an explanation of how these institutional and student funds are included in the current budget and the projected budget for 2022. Mr. Little explained that CARES Act funds are recorded in the Restricted Fund and looking at FY22 and beyond, there will be several funds that will be used to address strategic priorities. Moving forward, it will be important to look at the operating, capital and restricted funds that can be used to move the college in the direction of key strategic priorities. This will be one of the tools used as the college begins to respond to and address becoming the Online Premier Institution in the state of Maryland while continuing to provide general required services.

Mr. Little explained that on January 17th the college was awarded $2,157,673 in Student Emergency Aid and on January 19th the college was awarded $7,509,874 in additional Institutional Funding. The Stimulus Funding Team was established to help guide the institution towards deploying these funds in the most appropriate way. At this time the college is waiting for guidance from the Department of Education in using these additional funds. Until received, the college will continue to work under the direction of the original guidance.

Mr. Little explained that the primary focus is on the disruption of campus operations due to COVID, moving to a remote environment, and anything that helps build capacity to provide services remotely and to provide safe and socially distanced activities on campus.

Mr. Klasmeier inquired if these were appropriated funds. Mr. Little responded yes, the college received an award letter and the funds are specifically awarded for a specific time period. The additional funding was added onto the original funding. It is expected there will be an extension to the period of availability to minimally January 2022. Ms. Beardmore added that there will be information in the presentation showing these funds in the budget as restricted funds.

Mr. Klasmeier rephrased his question, asking if these funds were appropriated by the county council. Ms. Beardmore assured him that they were and the line item will be shown. Mr. Little clarified that there are actually two different things. At the county council level, regarding current restricted fund authorization, no issues are anticipated for FY 21 as unanticipated restricted funding for financial aid and other grants was built in. Also, there will be an appropriation request for FY22 that will reflect these additional funds.

Mr. Little provided an update on GEERS Funding – the funds distributed through the state, in support of education, primarily for workforce development programs. In round one, the college received $980,405 in September 2020 and in round 2, $725,500 in January 2021. These funds are being used to move forward programs identified as a strategic priority such as building capacity around the Workforce Development programs, creating scholarships for those programs, as well as providing instructional materials in support of the Clauson Center. Additionally, funds will be used to help students accelerate completion and support faculty equity analysis, thus using the stimulus funding in ways that help the college achieve long term goals within the strategic plan.

Ms. Beardmore presented an update on the Riverhawk Recovery Plan. The goal of this plan has been to learn from the last year and to innovate intentionally, building for the long term. This has been an opportunity to build on work beyond the recovery phases including the strategic plan, the Middle States Review, and the college’s Master Facilities Plan. Through shared governance, feedback has been obtained from staff, faculty and students. Currently, planning is underway for an increased face-to-face campus presence in the fall.

Dr. Lindsay described the thinking behind becoming the Premier Online Institution. Online education continues to grow and the pandemic has created the opportunity to become the Premier Online Institution. In spring 2020, in a little more than three weeks, over 1,200 classes moved to face-to face from in-person and our student support services moved entirely online.

The college’s measure of success has changed from student access to student completion. The college is looking to leverage student competency by such things as giving credit for prior learning, and increasing the number of online courses and transfer agreements with other colleges. Dr. Gavin added that the goal of becoming the Premier Online Institution in the state of Maryland falls under the strategic plan. Dr. Lindsay emphasized the opportunity the college has to become the Premier Online Institution in Maryland, building on successes already achieved.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez expressed appreciation of Dr. Lindsay’s vision and passion and shared her belief that it is spot on with the future, thanking her for her leadership. Mr. Klasmeier inquired as to where the impetus to be the Premier Online Institute come from. Dr. Lindsay shared that when looking at how to change this crisis into an opportunity that this was her vision and that the goal of being premier parallels what the college is already known for with in-person classes, with the same rigor and quality. Dr. Lindsay recognized the work of Learner Support Services to provide online tutoring and scheduling appointments for services.

Mr. Klasmeier inquired if students were included in conversations regarding online vs. in-person. Dr. Lindsay replied yes, and that the college is aware that students have different preferences and that the college is looking at understanding which groups do better with in-person instruction and working at bringing those classes back on campus first. The college is also looking to ensure student completion is possible for any modality the student chooses.

Mr. Ulvila commented on online learning as the way of the world now and that the college needs to have exceptional online capabilities. He applauded Dr. Lindsay for her focus. Ms. Barone offered, from a student’s perspective, her appreciation for how the college structures its online courses and her belief that the college is a Premier Online Institution. She added, that from her experience, the online learning management system and support throughout COVID has been phenomenal. It is her belief that the support is there and that the work is in recognizing differing student learning styles and meeting needs through the different learning modalities.

Ms. Moore thanked Ms. Barone for her comments and inquired if there is anything offered such as an Introduction to Online Learning to help students be successful. Dr. Gavin provided information on the requirement for students to take an Online Orientation class before registering for online courses. In addition, plans are underway for differentiating the orientation that will address differing technology abilities and skills required to be successful.

Mr. Klasmeier asked Dr. Gavin if work has happened to compare the efficacy of in-person vs. online for the same course. Dr. Gavin explained that ongoing work is completed each semester, looking at data and equity gaps of modalities and work to eliminate those gaps.

Mr. Klasmeier asked if it would be safe to say that a ‘good’ student will do well in either modality while a ‘marginal’ student will have more difficulty online. Dr. Gavin confirmed that that does seem to be the case and that many interventions have been put into place. Mr. Klasmeier shared that anecdotally when speaking to some high school students, that some do not like online and look forward to getting back in the classroom. Ms. Moore commented that it would be necessary to tease out how much is the social aspect and how much is the actually learning online.

Dr. Lindsay asked that when referring to students, labels be avoided and students are considered in regards to different learning styles and modality preferences, and the focus remain on ensuring that all students accomplish their completion goals. Ms. Beardmore added that the emphasis for online learning is for those students who want that modality, and that we continue to offer a balance of on-campus in-person classes.

Mr. Klasmeier commented that during the pandemic, online learning became essential, and that post-pandemic there may be aspects of online learning that remain attractive to students, but, he noted, that there remains something essential that happens in the classroom that may be lost, and is concerned that this may result in a less effective education being received by the student online that they would be unaware of until a later time. Dr. Gavin shared that the pandemic has allowed for innovation with pedagogy such as synchronous education. He recognized the differences in modalities and the advantages of each and that in the future there will be many variations of the two.

Dr. Lindsay shared regarding her own experience in an online environment and acknowledged that faculty work hard to mimic the advantages of the in-person experience. Ms. Barone validated the work of the faculty and commended them for the structure of the courses. Ms. Barone shared that her online experiences have been as valuable as her in-person courses, and recognized the work that has gone into creating an excellent online experience.

Mr. Ulvila commented that online is how work is being done these days and how this experience by our students is preparing them for their future. Ms. Moore shared that in Zooms and Teams, the use of breakout rooms allows for students to work collaboratively in small groups.

In reference to Dr. Lindsay’s comment about AACC being a destination college, Dr. Johnson commented that the board should think through this clearly because of the structure of the college as a Maryland state institution, structure of tuition (in-county, out-of-county, out-of-state), and other things. He also commented that the college has a mission to serve the surrounding area and asks that thought be given to this as the college implements and keeps the college competitive.

Dr. Patterson shared a few points regarding the Premier Online vision that are important - equity needs to be in the forefront particularly focused on how students access learning and resources; providing life balance and ensuring best practices; providing equity with technology and flexibility; maintaining compliance; and focusing on student development – ensuring accomplishment of goals. Dr. Patterson commented that she would expect by 2024 that students will be able to attend from anywhere.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez agreed with the vision and appreciated that the college has it. Dr. Gavin spoke to the actual experience envisioned. Goals set prior to the pandemic had the college moving online associate and certificate programs as well as a program with the University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) that allows students to complete a BA in four years from AACC/UMGC. The pandemic provided an opportunity to accelerate goals. Quality control is being implemented to ensure courses maintain initial quality. Professional development has been implemented to support faculty in moving online. Future possibilities are 6 under consideration that will help leverage technology, increase innovation and expand programs online that other colleges do not offer.

Ms. Beardmore reviewed resources in place in support of online learning stating that funding from the CARES Act has helped with investments. Ms. Beardmore reviewed the Financial Status Report and referenced budget materials page 6. Looking at financial projections for the current fiscal year, a balanced budget is projected for the year. Underspending in all categories of expenditures occurred.

Ms. Beardmore reminded the board that contingencies were put in place when planning for FY21 due to the unexpected nature of the pandemic which has resulted in $10.9 million in savings as of 12/31/20. Mr. Klasmeier asked if the numbers reflected the CARES and GEERS money. Ms. Beardmore stated the information she reviewed pertained to the operating budget. CARES and GEERS money will be reflected in a restricted fund. Ms. Beardmore shared that tuition and fees are tracking on budget and that the state rescinded FY 2021 funding of $4.2 million. The college anticipates adding to the fund balance. Expenditure savings were created through holding open positions vacant and hiring only critical positions in support of student success and learning. Unemployment costs were also lower than expected.

Ms. Beardmore briefly reviewed the college vision, the college mission, the purpose of the budget to help meet the mission, as well as the accountability mission mandate. Ms. Beardmore commented that in the budget materials on pages 50 forward, the comparison data has not been updated due to delays in receiving data from MACC. Ms. Beardmore emphasized the continual excellent fiscal management of the college. She stated that in 2017 the college received the inaugural award of the Government Finance Officers Association for Distinguished Budget Presentation and expressed her gratitude to Sue Callahan and Kathy Bolton for pursuing the award. Ms. Beardmore reviewed allocation of resources and shared that compared to other Maryland community colleges, AACC has the fifth lowest tuition. There will not be an in-county tuition rate increase for students in the FY 2022 budget. Ms. Beardmore reviewed the college’s affordability measures regarding course materials.

Dr. Johnson asked a question about the difference in fees on page 27 of the background materials compared to slide 49 of the presentation (last bullet) regarding fee increases and asked for clarification. Ms. Beardmore reviewed the process for determining fees for specific courses. She explained that the $47,000 in fees shown on page 27 is a result of a vetting process that justified charging a lab fee. The bullet on slide 49 is where other courses were assessed to look at all lab fees to determine which are necessary. These are separate analysis and the second analysis resulted in a refund to students. Dr. Johnson asked if the proposed changes in fees from page 27 where not approved by the board. Ms. Beardmore replied that was correct and that those changes are incorporated into the budget and that the agenda item will include a note stating these fees were incorporated into the budget for approval. Dr. Johnson asks that a justification be included.

Ms. Beardmore agreed. Mr. Klasmeier suggested highlighting increases and decreases in different colors. Ms. Beardmore continued, reviewing efficiencies and cost containments that show savings generated through cost containment and the work of the Administrative Services Review. She noted that adjunct costs continue to be the largest and savings continue to be generated in this area. 7 Ms. Beardmore provided an update on compensation and benefits which is over 80% of the budget and a budget priority. Ms. Beardmore shared the college’s review of its compensation system and practices. Through shared governance, the current compensation system was created. Ms. Beardmore emphasized the necessity of funding to maintain the fidelity of the system in order to keep pace with increasing labor markets.

Ms. Beardmore reviewed the college’s history of compensation increases and shared a comparison to other county entities, noting that there is an equity issue when comparing the college, county, public schools and library pay increases and college employees are falling below market. She shared that the impact for the college is that it continues to experience an increase in resignations and challenges in retaining and hiring qualified employees. Dr. Johnson asked to confirm that the college is losing faculty and staff. Ms. Beardmore confirmed this and restated that it is difficult to recruit, sharing that this can result in having to do multiple searches for some positions.

Ms. Beardmore reminded the board of its goal that faculty salaries be in the top three of Maryland’s large community colleges. She shared data on the average salaries of full-time faculty as compared to other state community colleges which showed the college’s current ranking. Dr. Johnson requested an explanation of the acronyms ‘CY’ and ‘PY’. Ms. Beardmore explained that they refer to ‘Current Year’ and ‘Past Year’. Dr. Johnson asked if a footnote could be added to which Ms. Beardmore agreed. Ms. Beardmore shared data on adjunct faculty rates as compared to other Maryland colleges. Currently AACC ranked second among the largest Maryland community colleges for FY21. A new level is proposed for adjunct – Lecturer III. Rationale for the new level was shared along with data showing the financial impact of the proposal. Dr. Gavin added that this is a student success initiative as well, ensuring the best adjunct are retained. Data on the budget request and impact on FY 22 and FY23 was also shared.

II. Proposed FY 2022 Operating Budget

Ms. Beardmore reviewed the building of the budget which begins with a look at what expenditures are absolutely necessary in support of strategic priorities. The guiding principles of the budget development process were also reviewed. Ms. Beardmore referred the board to pages 9 and 13 of the background materials for more details and took a moment to thank Dr. Johnson for his leadership on the budget. The Budget Committee considered several scenarios and has brought forward a recommended scenario. Referring to page 12 and 13, Ms. Beardmore noted the process of creating the various scenarios and how they came to the recommended one. Ms. Beardmore shared a graphic representation of the Budget Development Process for FY2022, showing the number of projects and which departments were making the requests. Ms. Beardmore reviewed a summary of the budget showing reductions and base adjustments.

Ms. Beardmore provided more details on how the budget supports the college’s compensation system. A pool of funds is proposed for college-wide compensation adjustments that reflects an average of 5% increase for the faculty and staff pool, as well as average 5% increase to the adjunct faculty pool. Technology budget items that were implemented during the pandemic with CARES Act funding were reviewed and will be assessed post-pandemic to determine which may be continued. Ms. Beardmore provided a recap of the budget summary showing the increase for the FY22 budget over the FY 21 budget is 1%.

Dr. Johnson asked about the number for strategic initiatives which is not shown on slide 75. He asked how that number is developed. Ms. Beardmore explained that the number is zero. Dr. Johnson added that he refers to another document which shows Strategic Initiative as $492,887. Ms. Sue Callahan shared that the other document he is referring to shows that Strategic Initiatives are the Essential Technology and that on slide 75 of the presentation, Essential Technology is broken out separately, reflecting Strategic Initiatives as zero. Ms. Beardmore noted that Essential Technology items are in support of Strategic Initiatives and that in this budget there is no other allocation of new funds for other strategic initiatives which were funded through reallocation.

Dr. Johnson asked if those dollars should be shown as a reduction and re-added in order to be consistent. Ms. Beardmore explained that this is not a reduction of the budget but rather a reallocation of the funds. Mr. Klasmeier asked how the request of nearly $4 million to the county is reconciled to the budget increase of $863,400. Ms. Beardmore noted that only expenditures have been reviewed and that clarity should come forth as revenue is reviewed.

Mr. Klasmeier asked if in the FY22 budget there are any new costs associated with the opening of the two new buildings. Ms. Beardmore noted that the nursing expansion is a big area of investment, but because it is funded through reallocation, it is not shown as a new expenditure in the budget.

Mr. Klasmeier asked about additional expenses associated with the size of the new building. Ms. Beardmore referred to Ms. Callahan who confirmed that sufficient savings are reflected in the budget that will accommodate the new Health and Life Sciences Building. Mr. Klasmeier expanded on the importance as the college is presenting to the county, of being able to expand on the costs associated with opening the two new facilities. Mr. Andrew Little emphasized that our reallocations are being used and some costs will be factored into the FY23 operating budget. For FY22 there will be time to use restricted capital funds. Ms. Beardmore continued with the revenue side of the budget. She reviewed state funding showing data for FY19 – FY22.

Ms. Beardmore explained that state aid to community colleges has been underfunded over time which has had a great impact in lost funding to community colleges, resulting in increases in tuition. County funding has been a more reliable funding partner. The proposed request to the county is for an increase of $4 million for FY22. The college will work closely with the county executive and the county council to achieve this.

Dr. Johnson asked if the stipend given last year was included in the FY2020 actual budget. Ms. Beardmore stated no, that those funds came in as one-time funds in the Restricted Fund. Ms. Beardmore stated that our revenue is a three-legged stool, coming from state, county and tuition and fees.

Mr. Klasmeier asked about the slide 82 bullet “Provides funding for the college’s pay package …” which is a discreet number elsewhere in the budget. It also says “…supports the expansion of our health professions programs.” which is not a discreet number in the budget. Ms. Beardmore explained the wording on this slide is for the board to show how the college came to the number requested of the county. It is not what will be presented to the county, and that it shows the expansion of the health professions programs as a component of the budget.

Mr. Klasmeier asks if the county will be able to see the discreet costs associated with the expansion in the budget. Ms. Beardmore explained that there are not line items included in the presentation showing new expenditures for this because the expenses are funded via reallocation. Mr. Klasmeier expressed his concern that this will be very hard to defend. Mr. Little added that the other portion of this is the capital side and that the college will be making capital 9 draws from county funds for the Health and Life Sciences Building and that is where capital expenses will be reflected. He emphasized that the capital budget and the operating budget are two different buckets. Mr. Klasmeier emphasized his concern regarding the subtlety of the situation. Dr. Johnson stated that the budget is actually a four-legged stool, with external resources bringing in revenue that hopefully will grow over time. Ms. Beardmore agreed. Mr. Klasmeier shared from his experience that it is easy for the county to understand the costs associated for opening a building and believes emphasis in this area will help.

Ms. Beardmore reviewed Tuition & Fees as part of the FY22 Operating Budget which shows no tuition increase or fee increase for in-county or out of state students. Due to state law, out-of-county tuition and fees must follow a specific formula and will see an increase. The proposed FY22 budget shows a small decrease of 1% from the FY21 budget due to the way the calculation is done. The number is based on no increase in full time equivalent enrollment over FY21. Ms. Callahan shared that there are also some adjustments in waivers and that the majority of the decrease is credit. Ms. Beardmore shared data showing the increase in out-of-county tuition. The Affordability Index was shared which shows how the college’s tuition and fees over the past four years compares to median household incomes in various counties of peer institutions. The data shows the college continues to compare well. Ms. Beardmore reviewed data on the Tuition Stabilization Fund (TSF) which includes a transfer from the TSF for FY22. Ms. Beardmore shared the board policy that the TSF be between 5-10% of the total proposed budget which the college is within. Mr. Klasmeier asked if the budget committee had a recommended target for the TSF. Ms. Beardmore responded that the target is the board policy of 5%-10% as shown on slide 89.

Dr. Johnson added that the budget committee did not make a recommendation outside of the board policy. Mr. Klasmeier commented that it was a big target. Dr. Johnson responded that there was consideration of using funds for some one-time things, but the discussion had not finished. Ms. Beardmore added that giving current uncertainties, the college can share with the county the necessity of that level, thinking about strategic deployment needs post-pandemic. Mr. Ulvila agreed with Mr. Klasmeier’s concerns in light of past experiences with the county and the TSF. He pointed out that the necessity of having contingencies to have surplus for the unexpected. Ms. Beardmore mentioned that the MOU for the TSF is in the board materials and documents the board policy and the agreement with the county.

Ms. Beardmore recapped the different sources of revenue, which ideally would be a third from the county, a third from the state, and a third from AACC. However, the state has lagged behind while the county has been a reliable source. Ms. Beardmore referred the board to page 15 of the supporting materials as she referenced the FY22 Budget Operating Summary. Ms. Beardmore gave an update on OPEB (Other Post-Employment Benefits) regarding future promises to employees. Funds are put into a trust by AACC that earn interest for paying this liability. The county is now contributing to the fund as well, on behalf of the college. In addition to the operating budget, the college submits to the county a schedule of auxiliary, enterprise and restricted funds. Restricted funds include any funds given to the college for a specific purpose and includes CARES Act funding and is where the FY21 one-time $1,500 stipend per employee was recorded.

The county council does appropriate the line item for total auxiliary, enterprise and restricted funds. The college is able to spend up to that total amount 10 and for spending additional funds which may come in, the college must request additional appropriation authority from the county council. Dr. Johnson commented on the importance of understanding that under restricted funds the difference between FY21 and FY22 is the huge increase in the CARES Act funds. Ms. Beardmore noted that some contingency is built into each category.

Mr. Klasmeier asked to confirm that the restricted funds are not reflected in the operating budget, even though they support the operating budget. Mr. Little explained that these funds support strategic initiatives but are not reflected in the operating budget, that they must be contained within the fund. Mr. Klasmeier asked if the college did not have those funds, would operating budget money be spent. Mr. Little confirmed this is correct. He also commented that without the CARES Act funding, that the college would not have the resources that allowed for the acceleration of some of our strategic initiatives. Mr. Klasmeier asked if the funds supplant an operating budget expenditure - what happens when the funds go away. Mr. Little shared that the stimulus funding team is strategizing as to the best use of the funds so as to not create unfunded situations in future budgets. Some of this will be difficult, as most technology is now subscription based and requires annual renewals. The focus is on building capacity using onetime investments.

Dr. Johnson summarized that he could speak to the funding of the college with the following talking points:

• The college is proposing an increase in faculty and staff salaries and is asking the county to support that;

• The college is able to keep in-county tuition flat;

• The college is using internal transfers to fund strategic initiatives;

• CARES Act funding has allowed the college to accelerate some strategic initiatives;

• Items that we are funding through CARES dollars may require future funding.

Ms. Beardmore thanked Dr. Johnson for the recap and promised to provide them as talking points for the board. Mr. Klasmeier emphasized the county’s commitment to the college which is represented by what they do for the operating budget, for OPEB, and the capital budget. Ms. Beardmore added that they also provide direct funding to build the buildings as well as service the debt. She added that the Glen Burnie Town Center is an in-kind building that the county allows the college to use. Emphasizing the good partnership of the county and the college, Ms. Beardmore elaborated on the vaccine clinic and the county reforestation efforts that the college allowed to happen on campus as well as easements the college has granted to the county. Mr. Ulvila added that the college generates future revenue for the county through its activities. Ms. Beardmore agreed and noted the Economic Impact Study done through EMSI through a Maryland Association of Community College (MACC) initiative. Erin Parker added another partnership with the county is the Anne Arundel County Workforce Corporation where the college is training the Anne Arundel County workforce.

III. Proposed FY 2022–2027 Capital Budget

Ms. Beardmore reviewed the proposed capital budget which funds facility construction, renovations, repairs and maintenance and is funded through the county and state where funding is restricted to these projects. The Health and Life Sciences Building is on budget, on schedule and on time and no funding will be needed in FY22. All project funding will end in FY21. The building is on scheduled to open in August of this year. Planning for move in is underway for early summer and consideration is being given as to how to occupy the building safely within the COVID environment.

Ms. Beardmore stated that capital projects usually have three phases: 11 design, construct, and equip. The capital budget reflects the 2016 Facilities Master Plan in which the number one priority was the Health and Life Science building, followed by the renovation and addition to the Dragun science building as well as renovation of the Florestano building. Prior to the pandemic an update to the Facilities Master Plan was planned which has been reinvigorated. Ms. Beardmore stated that the pandemic has provided an opportunity to rethink how the college works, how students are served, and the associated facilities needs of the new paradigm. Ms. Beardmore shared the deferred maintenance, repairs and replacements projects which are primarily funded by the county. Regarding the Information Technology project, Mr. Little added that the fiber infrastructure and basic building equipment are included in the Information Technology Enhancement line item. Mr. Ulvila noted that the discussion is the same among the 16 largest Maryland community colleges and that going forth, new buildings will happen less and repurposing of existing structures will be the norm. Ms. Beardmore shared that this is an exciting time to reimagine our facilities.

IV. Multi Year Budget Planning Tool

Ms. Beardmore reviewed the process of the board budget committee and emphasized the need to thoughtfully consider current decisions in light of what they will look like in the future. Use of scenario planning software has allowed the college to do scenario analysis to determine downstream impact quickly. Ms. Beardmore referred the board to the background materials on pages 58-64 in relation to this discussion. Mr. Little noted that the scenario information is not a representation of future budget requests, but a numerical and visual representation of future outcomes of decisions made today and the effect of those on the operating budget.

Mr. Little reviewed the process of using the Multi-Year Budget Planning tool in developing future scenarios. Mr. Little explained that these scenarios help the college clarify the assumptions on which the budget is created, to consider historic trends and to create future scenarios such as what if things get better, get worse, or a lot worse. From there the college can consider strategies, innovations and investment changes to address the challenges of each possible scenario. Having used the tool for five years, the college has been able to create a balanced budget.

The Multi Year Budget Planning Tool will continue to be an essential tool going forward and helps the college focus and check in on their progress and work. Mr. Klasmeier commended the work of Sue Callahan and Andrew Little and the work they have done in perfecting the use of this tool. Dr. Johnson noted the tool also is a help at looking at long term trends, and helpful for the college to guesstimate the future.

Mr. Klasmeier noted that this tool would be a great asset for the state as well.

Ms. Beardmore concluded the presentation and reminded the board that the item will appear on the Board agenda for approval at the February 23rd meeting before it is submitted to the county by March 1st.

The county budget hearing is set for March 30th and will be followed by presentation to the County Council in May. 12 Mr. Klasmeier asked to have a straw vote prior to assure there will be no ‘No’ vote at the approval meeting. Ms. Moore asked that any concerns be sent to her as two board members had to drop off of the meeting early so that answers may be had in advance. Ms. Moore thanked all who presented and Mr. Klasmeier and Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez concurred.

The meeting was adjourned at 11:44 a.m.

Feb. 23, 2021, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Moore at 4 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

II. VOTE TO CLOSE MEETING

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees approved the motion to close the open session. The public session reconvened at 4:30 p.m.

III. MEETING RECONVENE FOR PUBLIC SESSION

The public session of the Board of Trustees reconvened and was called to order by Ms. Moore at 4:30 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

IV. ROLL CALL AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Barone and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees approved the meeting agenda.

V. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

VI. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Minutes of the December 8, 2020 Board of Trustees Public Session Meeting

B. Minutes of the January 19, 2021, Board of Trustees Closed Session Meeting

C. Minutes of the January 19, 2021, Board of Trustees Special Meeting

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees approved the minutes of the December 8, 2020 public session meeting, the January 19, 2021 closed session meeting, and the January 19, 2021 special meeting.

VII. APPROVAL OF FACULTY SABBATICALS - DR. MICHAEL H. GAVIN, VICE PRESIDENT FOR LEARNING

Dr. Lindsay thanked the Board for their support of professional development and the continuation of faculty sabbaticals, as it is an opportunity for the faculty to enhance the learning experience for students.

Dr. Gavin reported that three sabbatical proposals were aligned with Anne Arundel Community College’s strategic plan. All focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion which are pillars of the college’s strategic plan. Dr. Sikorski will work on publishing a book and use what she learns of critical race theory, Latinx and African American literature and incorporate the content into creative writing courses and professional development in the English department. Dr. Hurd will research how pedagogy can be enhanced to ensure that students at all levels may succeed at the community college level. Dr. Brown will research how diversity, equity, and inclusion may be 2 incorporated into the creative writing program and will work on publishing a book of poetry writing.

Mr. Ulvila asked about the financial impact and the cost of adjuncts and payment of the faculty salaries. Dr. Gavin replied that there was no extra cost with the payment of the faculty salaries; the additional costs will be for the adjuncts, which would not exceed $41,000. Ms. Moore noted that she appreciated the fact that these three sabbaticals will be aligned the college’s strategic plan and will make an excellent addition to the curriculum.

By motion of Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees approved the three faculty sabbaticals.

VIII. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Reports for February

1. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair

i. Approval of the Removal of the Copyright Policy – Action Item

ii. Approval of the Antiracism, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Policy – Action Item

iii. Approval of the Drug and Alcohol Prohibitions Policy – Action Item

Ms. Darrah reported that at December 8, 2020 meeting the Board received the recommendations of the Board Policy Oversight Committee for the removal of the copyright policy, and revisions to the Antiracism, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Drug and Alcohol Prohibitions policies.

Ms. Darrah commented that the Copyright policy was approved by the board on December 13, 1988 and was revised in January 2012. This policy, as it presently exists, reflects a statement of law. The committee recommended that the policies for the board not simply be restatements of the law. Copyright as a policy is covered in the Board's Intellectual Property policy and because this is a Board approved policy, the committee recommended the Board approve the removal this policy.

Ms. Darrah stated that in the spring 2020, the Board approved the policy on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. The committee recommended an update of the policy to include antiracism, definitions for all concepts in the policy and include a statement that supports the efforts to promote antiracism and achieve diversity, equity and inclusion for students, faculty and staff.

Ms. Darrah reported that the committee recommended updating language in the Drug and Alcohol Prohibitions policy and clarifying prohibitions, exceptions and possible sanctions.

Dr. Johnson asked Ms. Darrah if the committee considered disciplinary action for contractors and others not part of Anne Arundel Community College. Erin Parker, general counsel, responded that the college can take disciplinary action against students and employees, but for contractors, often times, there is a provision in the contracts that would allow the college to go to the vendor so the vendor could take disciplinary action but even without a contractual provision, the college could issue a no-trespass order for contractors or guests on campus as well who violate the policy.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the removal of the Copyright policy and revised Antiracism, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Drug and Alcohol Prohibitions policies.

2. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

i. Approval of the FY 2022 College Operating Budget – Action Item

ii. Approval of the FY 2022 – 2027 Capital Budget – Action Item

Dr. Johnson reported that the budget committee has met three times on December 10, 2020, January 14, 2021, and January 26, 2021 since his last report and received updates on FY2021 operating budget status as of November 30, 2020, updates of the strategic plan, progress on administrative services and review, Coronavirus Aid Relief, Economic Security (CARES) Act, Riverhawk Recovery efforts, budgetary impacts of the pandemic and remote operations, strategic use of CARES Act funding to support students and the college's transition to remote operations, and the college's plan to return post pandemic in a sustainable and resilient way.

Dr. Johnson reported that the committee discussed the status of FY2022 budget development process and the multi-year budget planning tool. The multi-year budget planning tool uses assumptions and software to facilitate the visualization of the out year impact of changes in key variables like salary and benefits, fee revenue, and state and county support.

The committee reviewed the proposed FY2022 to FY2027 capital budget, and endorsed the presentation at the budget workshop. With the continued challenges facing the institution under the shadow of the global pandemic, reallocations continue to play an important role in finding initiatives under the strategic plan to presume outcomes.

Dr. Johnson stated that committee is pleased to present a budget recommendation that holds tuition rates flat for in-county students. Dr. Johnson asked Ms. Beardmore to provide an overview of FY2022 operating and FY2022-2027 capital budgets. Ms. Beardmore thanked Dr. Johnson, the budget committee members, Andrew Little and Sue Callahan who have spent the last six months working on the budget.

Ms. Beardmore reported that reallocation of existing budget plays a key role in the funding solutions in support of the strategic plan. The budget shows about $3.1 million in ongoing reallocation investments in support of strategic initiatives as the college moves into the new strategic plan. Ms. Beardmore reported good news with the current fiscal year, that the college will have a balanced budget.

Ms. Beardmore reminded the Board of the college’s vision, mission, the purpose of the budget is to help the college meet its mission and the guiding principles and priorities for the budget development process. The proposed FY2022 operating budget is $120,496,700, which is an increase of $863,400 from the FY2021 budget. The FY2022 budget includes reductions for onetime items from FY 2021, and funds increases in base adjustments, compensation, and information technology.

The projected revenue from the state, Cade funding, is expected to increase by $1.6 million from FY2021. The college will ask for an increase of $4 million from the county, and tuition and fee revenue is budgeted to be relatively flat. The proposed budget does not include a tuition and fee increase for in-county or out-of-state students. There out-of-county tuition and fee would increase due to state mandates. Ms. Beardmore cautioned the Board that changes could be made after the budget is approved on June 14.

For the FY2022 – 2027 proposed capital budget, Ms. Beardmore commented that the number one priority in FY2021 had been the Health and Life Sciences Building, which is scheduled to open in August 2021. The focus of the FY2022 capital budget is deferred maintenance projects, including campus improvements, walkways, roads and parking lots, systemics and information 4 technology enhancements. In the out years, the college’s priorities include the Dragun science building renovation and addition and a renovation of the Florestano building.

Dr. Johnson asked if the motion would include the restricted funds appropriation authority, and Ms. Moore confirmed that it did. Mr. Klasmeier noted there is a tendency to view the operating and capital budgets as the ultimate commitment of the state and county; however, there are other channels of money that support pieces of the college’s budget, which should be acknowledged.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and by a roll call taken by trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the FY2022 College Operating Budget the amount of $120,496,700 and the auxiliary, enterprise, and restricted funds appropriation authority in the amount of $49,637,300 and FY2022-2027 Capital Budget. Ms. Moore thanked Ms. Beardmore, Mr. Little and Ms. Callahan for their incredible work on the budget.

3. Facilities Committee – Jerome W. Klasmeier, Committee Chair

Mr. Klasmeier reported that the facilities committee met on February 18, 2021 and discussed the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the Health and Life Sciences Building and forest conservation easements. The facilities committee reviewed the list of future procurements along with the four procurement items on the agenda. Mr. Klasmeier noted the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades continues to work with the architect and construction manager to finalize the guaranteed maximum price.

4. AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Lead Liaison

Mr. Ulvila asked Ms. Barone to read a donor thank you letter. Ms. Barone noted that the letter was from a current student at Anne Arundel Community College who was awarded the Dr. Thomas Scholarship. The student was grateful for the scholarship which decreased her financial burden and allowed her to focus on the most important aspect of school – learning. She was a nursing major with an emphasis in pediatric care and plans to graduate in the spring of 2022. This generosity inspired her to help others and give to the community. Mr. Ulvila reported that the fundraising total for the current fiscal year was just over $1.2 million in gifts and commitments, and the total campaign revenue is $9.82 million. In the months of December 2020 and January 2021, the Foundation received significant gifts including another $100,000 gift from the estate of Dr. Henry Dragun. He also reported that the AACC Foundation is developing a three-year strategic plan to guide the foundation's work in FY2022-2024.

5. Board Chair Report – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

i. Board By-Laws – Information Item

ii. Board Procedures – Information Item

Ms. Moore informed the Board that proposed changes to the Board By-Laws and Board procedures were included as information items. The primary changes include identifying appropriate procedures for meetings and the need for public comment. Ms. Moore would like to adopt consent agendas as well. At the March meeting, the Board will vote on these and she asked the trustees to review them carefully.

IX. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay announced that AACC was one of ten colleges selected to participate in the Achieving the Dream and the University of Southern California Race and Equity Center Racial Equity Leadership Academy, a year-long program scheduled to begin in summer 2021. The program is designed to increase student completion through an intentional design to eliminate the barriers to equity. Dr. Lindsay stated that in December 2020, 65 nurses graduated and received their pins. The nursing’s associate degree program was ranked the best in Maryland in 2020 based on the pass rates among first-time test takers. Dr. Lindsay reported that the college is a county site for the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines run by the Anne Arundel County Health Department. The Riverhawk Recovery teams continue to meet and faculty, staff, and students had the opportunity to participate in “New Paradigm” planning, providing feedback and suggestions about ways to better serve our students, workforce and community as we emerge from the pandemic.
  2. Monthly Update on Accreditation – Dr. Gregory R. Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee
    Dr. Schrader reported that the steering committee met on February 12 and implemented the suggestions from the college community regarding the institutional priorities and self-study outcomes as well as the communication plan. Dr. Schrader noted that the first draft of the selfstudy design was complete. In the spring, Dr. Robert Bonfiglio, Vice President, Middle States Commission on Higher Education will be meeting virtually with the college leadership team to discuss the self-study design and reaccreditation process.
  3. Student Government Association – Ryan Kim, President
    Mr. Kim provided an update on Student Government Association activities as the committees continue to plan and organize activities to promote student engagement. They have hosted workshops regarding health and wellness, financial aid, taxes, budgeting and investing, and jobs in the post COVID-19 world. Mr. Kim reported that the Student Government Association sent out cards to nursing homes as a pen pal initiative, and went to high schools in the county virtually to showcase what Anne Arundel Community College has to offer. The Student Government Association is working on cultural and social events such as a book club for students, a workshop about deaf culture and more. Mr. Kim noted he is grateful for club leaders and members for thinking creatively on how to plan the activities for the students. Dr. Lindsay noted that Mr. Kim and Ms. Barone attended student advocacy day with legislators and did a wonderful job representing Anne Arundel Community College.
  4. Academic Forum/Council – Myra Dennis, Chair (no report)
  5. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President
    i. Changes to the Faculty Organization Charter – Information Item
    Dr. Tannenbaum discussed the proposed changes to the TFO charter presented to the Board as an information item. All of the changes have been approved by of the faculty, by Dr. Lindsay, the Vice Presidents and general counsel. Two of the changes involve adding adjunct faculty members to the compensation committee and TFO Senate; another change moves the election cycle; and the last change pertains to the special elections committee. 6 Dr. Tannenbaum provided an update on the progress of evaluations and tenure ad hoc committee. The committee was charged with creating a meaningful process for evaluating faculty performance, including equitable ways to allocate tenure track appointments and multiple year contracts. TFO endorsed a new reflective narrative tool that was used as part of the evaluation process. The evaluations and tenure process needs to satisfy two goals: (1) encouraging all faculty to engage in continuous improvement and defining what constitutes acceptable performance and (2) creating a better process for what to do when a faculty member is not meeting that standard.
  6. Professional and Support Staff Organization – Anne Bashore, President
    Ms. Bashore reported that PSSO leadership administered a survey in response to Dr. Lindsay's request to determine the COVID 19 relief efforts for the workforce. Nine universal themes and solutions were identified. Ms. Bashore commented that the Community Service Committee is planning a spring donation drive and exploring three different opportunities: the Blue Ribbon Project that provides back packs of essential supplies to foster children in transition; partnering with local homeless shelters; or supporting HelpLink and the food pantry with donations.
  7. Administrative Staff Organization – Dr. Danny M. Hoey, Jr., President (no report)
  8. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay reported that the annual MACC leadership conference was held Monday, January 25 in which the Board members received updates about the legal issues that may impact higher education this year and 2021 legislative agenda was discussed. Dr. Lindsay was pleased to participate in the MACC Student Advocacy Day with nine Anne Arundel Community College students, including Ms. Barone and Mr. Kim as they met with various Anne Arundel County delegates and senators to speak about how pending legislation would impact them. The MACC Legislative Committee has been meeting weekly since the session started, reviewing the numerous bills introduced this session.

B. Action Items

  1. Approval of Histotechnician, Associate of Applied Science Program – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning
    Dr. Gavin stated that the proposed Histotechnician, Associate of Applied Science program was approved by the college’s Committee on Educational Policies and Curriculum and the Academic Forum in spring 2021. This program consists of coursework that already has faculty and resources in place. No additional resources are required to offer these programs, except for the cost of providing additional faculty should enrollment grow. By motion of Ms. Barone, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve histotechnician, associate of applied science program.
  2. Approval of 2021-2022 Academic Calendar – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning
    The academic calendar was developed by the registrar's office and reviewed by the Committee on Teaching and Learning and by the administration. Dr. Gavin noted that it was submitted to Academic Council for information on January 28, 2021. By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the 2021-2022 academic calendar.
  3. Approval of Health & Life Sciences Building, Scientific Models – Ms. Melissa Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management
  4. Approval of Health & Life Sciences Building, Nikon Microscopes – Ms. Melissa Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management
  5. Approval of Canon Black and White Production Machines – Ms. Melissa Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management
  6. Approval of Varonis – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Ms. Moore reported that items IX.B.3-IX.B.6 will be presented as one motion. Ms. Beardmore reported that work is continuing on providing the Health and Life Sciences Building with the appropriate furniture, fixtures and equipment. The two equipment procurements for Board approval items IX.B.3 and IX.B.4 are for instructional equipment for the biology labs. Ms. Beardmore noted that the project is funded by the county and state, and is on time and on budget. The college is buying 62 different types of models for a total of 606 items, which range in price of the models from $12 per unit, the human scapula model to $5,930. Next, Ms. Beardmore reported the college is purchasing two models of microscopes, the E200 model and the E100 model, including accessories to be used in biology labs. Ms. Beardmore stated that Canon production machines are needed to replace the current machines in the Copy Center. The college will be replacing four black and white copy machines (two in the production area for use of the document services staff for high volume production work and two copiers in the lobby for the use of faculty and staff). Ms. Beardmore noted that the contract replaces the current machines which are at the end of their useful life. The maintenance cost is the per copy cost based on estimated use. The college takes the two components of the cost, the lease (fixed cost) and maintenance (variable cost) for the total cost. Ms. Beardmore discussed the Varonis software. The information security team uses this software to monitor the systems. The college recommends to award to the low bid firm and sign a three-year contract. Ms. Beardmore commented that the college will use the CARES Act funding for this software. Dr. Patterson was available to answer additional questions. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted to approve the Health and Life Sciences Building Scientific Models, the Health and Life Sciences Nikon Microscopes, the Canon Black and White Production Machines, and the Varonis software.
  7. Approval of the Forest Conservation Easement to Anne Arundel County – Ms. Melissa Beardmore, Vice President, Learning Resources Management
    Ms. Beardmore commented that the county needed to invest reforestation funds that the county had collected from developers and requested to plant on campus. Canopy trees and 1,600 shrubs were planted in the easements located off the main entrance on College Parkway and at the back of campus behind parking lot C, about one acre and not on space in which the college could build upon. Ms. Beardmore noted the agreements protect the land for existing and future use by limiting certain activities and preventing structures or development in the area. This was reviewed by legal counsel, and if the Board approves, then the Board Chair will sign the documents and the college will submit to the county. Dr. Johnson asked where he could find the reference point/property line to determine where the forest conservation easement is located. Mr. Chaput noted that the boundaries are all identified on the forest conservation easement and that the entire forest conservation easement is included in the exhibit documents. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Barone, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees voted to approve to execute the forest conservation easement.

X. NEW BUSINESS

XI. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Chair Moore advised that the next board meeting will be March 9, 2021.

IX. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:20 p.m.

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on February 23, 2021, at 4:00 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to §3-305(b)(15) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code § 3- 305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, Paula J. Darrah, Briana Barone, Dr. James H. Johnson, and Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr. Jerome W. Klasmeier arrived at 4:12 p.m. and Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez arrived at 4:13 p.m. Dr. Dawn Lindsay, Melissa Beardmore, Dr. Michael Gavin, Dr. Felicia Patterson, Erin Parker, Andrew Little, John Williams and Monica Rausa Williams were also present. The board discussed the capabilities of cybersecurity software needed to protect the college’s information technology environment. The meeting began at 4:05 p.m. and ended at 4:14 p.m.

March 9, 2021, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Moore at 4 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

II. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

III. ROLL CALL AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the meeting agenda.

IV. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore stated that the Board of Trustees would not do a consent agenda on these three items.

A. Approval of the Minutes of the February 11, 2021 Board Budget Workshop Meeting

Mr. Ulvila moved to approve the minutes of the February 11 Board Budget Workshop, which was seconded by Mr. Klasmeier.

Dr. Johnson requested five changes: (1) Line 56, the statement should be the “percentage” of minority population has increased; (2) Line 163, it should be “face-to-face;” (3) Line 237, add a reference to Dr. Lindsay’s earlier comment referring to AACC being a destination institution and how he thought that the board should think this through clearly because there is a hierarchy of how things are arranged within the state of Maryland based on MACC and other things; (4) Line 355, change to “an average of 5%;” and (5) Line 531, the word “building” should be plural “buildings.”

Mr. Ulvila amended his motion to include the above changes, which was seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the minutes of the February 11, 2021 Board budget workshop meeting.

B. Approval of the Minutes of the February 23, 2021 Board of Trustees Closed Session Meeting

By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved minutes of the February 23, 2021 Board of Trustees closed session meeting.

C. Approval of Minutes of the February 23, 2021 Board of Trustees Public Session Meeting

Ms. Darrah moved to approve the minutes of the February 23, 2021 public session meeting, which was seconded by Mr. Klasmeier. Dr. Johnson noted that he had two minor edits regarding the minutes, which could be addressed as editorials that did not need to be discussed, and could be incorporated later. A roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved minutes of the February 23, 2021 Board of Trustees public session meeting.

V. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Reports for March

1. Human Resources Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair

Mr. Ulvila reported that the committee met before the Board meeting and received updates on collective bargaining, fall 2021 planning, the new recruitment video, and employee wellness. The committee also discussed future meetings. The college will be offering more in-person classes including what the college is calling “priority classes” (e.g. developmental classes, hands on labs and gateway courses in business, economics, and psychology etc.). The college will also align in-person student services with the in-person classes when practical.

The committee viewed the new recruitment video, which Mr. Ulvila stated was excellent, and received an update on the various employee wellness activities that are under way to engage and support employees during the challenging times. The committee's next meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, April 27 from 3-4 p.m.

2. Board Chair Report – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

i. Board Bylaws – Action Item

Mr. Ulvila moved to approve the revised Board of Trustees bylaws, which was seconded by Mr. Klasmeier. Ms. Moore asked if there was any discussion.

Dr. Johnson noted that there is a conflict between lines 87-90 in the redline version, which states that the Chair shall sign “all” legal documents approved by the Board and lines 349-352, which states that the President may sign legal documents “on behalf of the Board.” Erin Parker, General Counsel, responded to Dr. Johnson’s questions and proposed amendments to clarify that either the Board Chair or the President could sign contracts and to remove “on behalf of the Board” to comport with current practice and allow for flexibility. Ms. Darrah commented regarding the President’s ability to delegate signature authority to another employee but did not request a change. Mr. Ulvila commented that from his experience, the Chair signs very few documents, usually items brought up in public session. Dr. Lindsay commented that intent is to capture what the Board wants as they are the Board’s bylaws. Dr. Lindsay appreciated the Board’s guidance so the bylaws can be updated. Ms. Moore noted that the changes would be included as an amendment to the motion.

Ms. Darrah commented that she welcomed the update to bring current and best practices to the bylaws, and any amendments or changes could be of significant consequence. Ms. Darrah stated that the changes regarding filling vacancies of the Chair or Vice Chair would be a change to current practice where the red-lined version provides for the Vice Chair to automatically assume the office of the Chair, which she felt conflicted with the statement that the vacancy of the Chair or Vice Chair may be filled by the Board at any regular or special meeting.

Ms. Parker responded to questions. Ms. Moore suggested that Ms. Darrah recommend changes that she feels would be appropriate for this section. Dr. Lindsay recommended pulling the action item so the Board could take their time to discuss these specifics, make revisions and then bring it back to the next meeting, and Ms. Moore agreed.

Ms. Darrah noted that noted a concern that the Board Chair, at the Chair’s sole discretion, can call for any meeting to be in person, rather than remote, and sought an amendment so that three (3) trustees could call for a meeting to be in person to mirror the section on three (3) trustees being able to call a special meeting.

Dr. Johnson also commented that the bylaws state a quorum being five members, which is not the case now because the Board has a vacancy and sought a change to state a majority of trustees. Ms. Moore agreed. Ms. Darrah pointed out that there may be other references to five trustees constituting a quorum in the bylaws and to ensure those references were changed as well.

By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Dr. Johnson, the Board unanimously agreed to table the discussion of the Board bylaws until the next meeting and provide an opportunity for changes to be made. Ms. Moore asked for any additional changes to be sent to her via email, which could be discussed at the next meeting.

ii. Board Procedures – Action Item

Ms. Moore decided to table this item until the next meeting until the changes to the bylaws have been approved. She asked the trustees to send their comments or changes on the procedures to her and they would be reviewed at the next meeting.

iii. Nominating Committee

Ms. Moore reported that nominations will be voted on in May for the office of Chair and Vice Chair. Ms. Moore asked Ms. Darrah and Mr. Ulvila to form the nominating committee for next year's officers of the Board. Ms. Moore indicated that if any of the trustees would like to submit their names for consideration to contact Ms. Darrah and Mr. Ulvila. At the April meeting, the nominating committee will announce the names for consideration. Once the names are announced at the April meeting that closes the nomination process.

VI. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay was pleased to share that Forbes magazine reported that Anne Arundel Community College was ranked #1 community college by Academic Influence. This was the organization's first ranking of two-year colleges and AACC topped the list. Dr. Lindsay discussed plans for fall 2021, which includes having 20% of classes face-to-face, 50% online/online sync, and 30% a mix of hybrid formats with both modalities. She noted that a number of faculty and staff have been on campus working since March 2020 and have paved the way for our gradual return to campus Dr. Lindsay provided updates related to students, including offering new learning spaces, which are monitored computer labs designed for students to participate in online and online synchronous classes at the Arnold and Arundel Mills locations and the return of Athletics for the spring season. The student newspaper, the Campus Current, is on the short list of finalists for the Associated Collegiate Press’s Pacemaker Award.
  2. Update to Engagement Matters II: Excellence through Innovation – Dr. Michael H. Gavin
    i. Revisions to Strategic Plan Engagement Matters II: Excellence through Innovation (FY 2021 - FY 2024) – Information Item
    In the fall, Dr. Gavin gave a presentation to the Board about infusing diversity, equity, and inclusion into the strategic plan as antiracism requires a focus on policy. Dr. Gavin recommended particular revisions to the language in the strategic plan, and Dr. Johnson made a couple of recommendations as well. Those changes were presented and reviewed by the Strategic Planning Council, and approved. The proposed changes include adding antiracism to the engagement objective of “create an antiracist and equitable culture” and to the resources objective “allocate resources in support of the college mission in responsible, sustainable, antiracist and equitable ways.” Dr. Gavin commented this would align with the revised antiracism, diversity, equity, and inclusion policy the Board approved at the last meeting. Dr. Lindsay noted that this is an information item, which will be presented at next Board meeting for approval.
  3. Middle States Workshop: “Applying, Assessing, and Documenting Effective Board Governance” – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Board of Trustees, Accreditation Steering Committee Member and Dr. Alycia Marshall, Associate Vice President for Learningand Academic Affairs and Middle States Accreditation Liaison Officer
    Dr. Marshall and Dr. Johnson reported on a workshop they attended hosted by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, “Applying Assessing and Documenting Effective Board Governance.” Dr. Marshall is the college’s accreditation liaison officer and Dr. Gregory Schrader is the steering committee chair. AACC is finalizing its self-study design and the steering committee will be presenting it to the President and vice presidents for review shortly.
    AACC will be hosting Dr. Robert Bonfiglio, the vice president liaison from Middle States, for a virtual visit at the end of April. Dr. Bonfiglio will be meeting with multiple stakeholders, including Board of Trustees members, the President, steering committee and members of the larger college community. March 2023 is AACC’s self-study site visit, and the report will be completed by January of 2023.
    Dr. Johnson highlighted the qualities of a well-functioning board, noting that AACC has the best people serving on its Board. Important attributes include people committed to an institution, wellinformed about the rules and responsibilities of trusteeship, actively participating in the work, addressing the right issues, and having people engaged to add value.
    Dr. Johnson commented that recognizing good board governance in higher education emerges from the ongoing integration of three components: (1) attention centered on the big picture and the long view and not getting involved with the day-to-day management of the college; (2) strong working relationship with the President and having mutual respect and trust for one another; (3) the integration of those two things to provide guidance and recommendations to the President. Boards establish policies, bylaws and provide assurance of strong financial management and AACC’s Board already has several committees to oversee that.
    Dr. Marshall stated that there are 15 requirements of affiliation that an institution has to justify and prove for accreditation. AACC is meeting those affiliation requirements, as well as the standards. The requirements of affiliations that apply to the Board include ensuring the quality and integrity of the institution and that the work is aligned with its mission; adhering to the conflict of interest policy; and ensuring that information shared with stakeholders, external and internal, and accurately represents the work that the institution is doing.
    Dr. Marshall commented that there are seven middle state standards and the governance, leadership, and administration standard involves the Board. Dr. Johnson added that the institution should be governed and administered in a manner that allows it to realize the mission and goals in a way that benefits the institution, its students and other constituencies it serves.
    Per Middle States, there are five attributes an accredited institution should demonstrate: (1) clearly articulated and transparent governance structure; (2) legally constituted government body that serves the public interest; (3) sufficient independence and expertise to insure the integrity of the institution; (4) oversees at the policy level which includes basic policy-making and a role in the financial affairs to ensure integrity and strong financial management; and (5) establish a written conflict of interest.
    Dr. Johnson noted that there were different tools that institutions have used to gauge effectiveness based upon 35 Middle States self-study documents and many of these have been implemented by AACC. Dr. Marshall said what the Board of Trustees Members can do to help AACC be successful in the accreditation process is to be familiar with the standards, particularly, Standard VII – Governance, Leadership and Administration.
  4. Student Government Association – Ryan Kim, President
    Mr. Kim reported on activities from the past month, including hosting a virtual club fair and workshops on cybersecurity. The SGA committees are working hard to plan creative and exciting events to raise awareness and promote engagement and professional development. Mr. Kim noted that keeping students engaged while online has been challenging but he was grateful for the senators and vice presidents of the clubs for being continuously active and grateful for the Board’s continuous support.
  5. Academic Forum/Council – Myra Dennis, Chair
    i. Establishing the Institutional Review Board Committee – Information Item
    ii. Replacing the Teaching and Learning Subcommittee – Information Item
    Ms. Dennis reported that the committees of the Academic Forum are focusing on processes, procedures, membership, and policies that impact diversity, equity, inclusion and antiracism. The other focus is online learning, including getting everyone up to speed, looking at processes and changes to procedures to help provide the best online education and support to faculty and students. Ms. Dennis presented two information items, the establishment of an institutional review board committee under the academic forum and replacing the Committee on Teaching and Learning Subcommittee for Thematic Learning Communities, with the Subcommittee on High Impact Practices. The institutional review board will provide oversight for all research projects and activities involving human subjects to ensure that ethical standards are followed and the rights, welfare, and well-being of participants are protected as outlined in the code of federal regulations for the protection of human subjects. The Subcommittee on High Impact Practices will expand to support different types of high impact practices on campus, not just thematic learning communities. Dr. Johnson questioned whether or not these information items should come to the Board for approval as they are not policy related. Dr. Lindsay responded that normally committees do not need Board approval, but Ms. Dennis and Ms. Parker noted that since these are changes to the Academic Forum charter, historically, these type of changes have been presented to the Board for approval. Dr. Lindsay suggested that the college will review these items, and Ms. Parker added that she will review the charter and process to see if something could be changed. She agreed with Dr. Johnson, that changes proposed by the faculty and their committees should not have to be approved by the Board but recognized that may require changes to the charter. Dr. Zoppi commented that if it is not one of the Board policies being addressed, the college should be addressing it and there should be some agreement on what comes to the Board so both the Board and the college are working together towards a common goal. Ms. Moore commented that it was important to bring these forward as information items, the college will go back and review to determine whether or not this needs Board approval.
  6. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President (no report)
  7. Professional and Support Staff Organization – Anne Bashore, President (no report)
  8. Administrative Staff Organization – Dr. Danny M. Hoey, Jr., President
    Dr. Hoey reported that the ASO leadership was working closely with Dr. Lindsay and the vice presidents to address and provide solutions to the complex issues that emerged when ASO surveyed the contingency groups regarding COVID-19 relief. He also commented that ASO has provided workshops on workplace empathy and self-care to provide some type of means for constituency groups to work through the issues related with COVID-19.
  9. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay reported that MACC Legislative Committee continues to provide updates on legislation affecting community colleges, such as the Universal FAFSA, waiver reimbursements, Cade Revisions and the Transfer with Success Act. MACC is currently searching for a new executive director as Dr. Bernie Sandusky is retiring in June. The search committee has been reviewing applications now and the new executive director should start July 1.

B. Action Items

  1. Approval of Revisions to The Faculty Organization Charter – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President, The Faculty Organization
    Dr. Tannenbaum reported that at the last Board meeting she presented four changes to The Faculty Organization charter as an information item, which were presented as an action item at this meeting. In order to strengthen the voice of the adjunct faculty, two of the changes involve adding adjunct faculty members to the compensation committee and to The Faculty Organization Senate. The third change is to move the senator and officer elections to earlier in the academic year (March) to allow additional time for onboarding new officers and senators. The last change relates to the status of faculty members for special elections. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Dr. Zoppi, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the revisions to The Faculty Organization charter.
  2. Approval of 2021-2022 Academic Calendar – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President, Learning
    Dr. Patterson reported that the college would like to purchase laptops, computers, and peripherals for 453 faculty and staff replacements. She noted that the college plans to replace standard desktop computers with laptops and accessories for full time faculty and staff. Dr. Patterson reported this will address performance, security and flexibility that will help to strengthen the virtual environment. The college is considered a Dell direct customer, and as such is offered pricing at or below the wholesale price. Dr. Patterson noted that as is typical in Board procurements, a 10% contingency was added for configurations that might be needed. She noted that if the Board approved this award of contract, the college will begin implementation planning with installation to be completed by the end of 2021. Dr. Patterson reported that the college will evaluate and repurpose the desktop computers which are functional and under warranty to various computer labs. As the contract is directly related to the disruption of campus operations due to COVID and the ability to support flexibility and remote environments, the costs are eligible for support from the strengthening institutions and institutional portion of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act or CARES. Funding is available through June 2021 but the administration intends to request an extension to the timeframe if it is not automatically extended by the oversight agency. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the purchase of faculty and staff computer equipment and peripherals from Dell marketing LP in Texas not to exceed $725,596.
  3. Approval of Consulting Services for Prior Learning Assessment and CompetencyBased Learning – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President for Learning
    Dr. Gavin asked the Board for approval of an award for a contract to deliver a plan to increase the acceptance of prior learning credit and competency-based learning. This will accelerate students through programs of study and potentially enhance completion numbers and rates of our students. Dr. Gavin reported that in accordance with the purchasing regulation established under the Maryland code and board policy this was a two phased process. The college received two proposals for this contract, and ultimately, the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers was selected. They were selected with a contract of $121,200 with a 10% field adjustment added to that cost. Dr. Gavin noted that work would begin in 2021 and would be completed before the end of the grant period in December 2021. The funding comes from the governor's emergency fund, the college is eligible for up to $980,405 to support the qualifying costs of which a full contract is estimated at $133,320. Mr. Klasmeier asked Dr. Gavin about the scope of work. Dr. Gavin responded that there are policy level changes that need to be made internally to the college’s competency based and prior learning assessments that have to be approved by MHEC, and that the consultant will assist the college with that process. Dr. Gavin commented that like most community colleges, AACC needs to develop a seamless approach, in which a student can come to the college with certain experiences in their work or employment history and the college, and along with the consultant will map out how that experience tracks to program competencies so the student may receive credit in academic programs. Dr. Gavin noted that the consultant will identify the course outcomes associated with work experience, create a database of those outcomes as well as crosswalk that the student can access through an app or registration system. Mr. Klasmeier commented that if there was a high school student that spent four years in the military and came to the college looking to begin their academic career, this would allow the person to have the experience from the military evaluated to determine the appropriate placement and credit. Ms. Darrah asked if this contract involves training the college's staff as part of the transition to have designated employees to provide that assistance. Dr. Gavin responded that the proposal includes training, infrastructure and everything needed to scale up these efforts. Dr. Johnson asked Dr. Gavin about the two proposal prices. Kip Kunsman, Dean of Continuing Educational Workforce Development, who spearheaded the process, provided background and reported that the cost from the other bid finalist was significantly higher, and that the higher rated organization was American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers. Dr. Johnson asked questions regarding the pricing of the other finalist, and Andrew Little responded to Dr. Johnson that the college requested a fixed rate for each deliverable so it did not get a composition of the labor rates they used. By motion of Ms. Barone, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote to approve, the Board unanimously approved the award of contract for delivery of a plan to increase the use of prior learning assessment and competency based learning along with training and policy development to the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers in an amount not to exceed $133,320. Before moving on to new business, Ms. Moore commented that while Dr. Lindsay mentioned the honor that was been bestowed on Anne Arundel Community College by Academic Influence this was a remarkable achievement thanks to the faculty, staff and students at the college. The college did not apply for this award - it was a complete surprise. It speaks to the amazing dedication of the President, the leadership team, and everyone who works at the college, and the Board of Trustees, and she wanted to recognize that.

VII. NEW BUSINESS

VIII. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Ms. Moore advised that the next board meeting will be April 13, 2021.

IX. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m.

April 13, 2021, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. CALL TO ORDER

The open session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Moore at 3:31 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

II. VOTE TO CLOSE MEETING

By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved to close the open session and move to closed session.

III. MEETING RECONVENE FOR PUBLIC SESSION AT 4:00 P.M.

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Moore at 4:01 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

IV. ROLL CALL AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Mr. Ulvila and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the meeting agenda.

V. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

VI. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Approval of the Minutes of the March 9, 2021 Board of Trustees Public Session

Mr. Klasmeier moved to approve the March 9, 2021 minutes, which was seconded by Ms. Moore.

Dr. Johnson requested that the March 9, 2021 Board of Trustees Public Session minutes reflect the unanimous Board approval when appropriate or the actual vote count for the items approved. Ms. Moore concurred.

A roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, and the Board unanimously approved the minutes of the March 9, 2021 Board of Trustees public session.

VII. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Reports for April

1. Audit & Finance Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

i. Acceptance of the FY2020 Federal Financial Aid and Grants Audit Report – Action Item

Dr. Johnson reported that as a follow up to his November 10th report on the agenda is the acceptance of the college’s fiscal year 2020 federal financial aid and grants audit, also known as the single audit. COVID-19 delayed the Federal Office of Management and Budget’s finalization of the Federal Compliance Supplement, which prescribes the auditor’s required testing for federal grants, and the final compliance supplement has been released and the auditors have completed their audit procedures.

The auditors issued an unmodified or clean opinion with no findings or questioned costs, management advisory letter, material weaknesses, significant deficiencies, control deficiencies, or audit adjustments. The results are consistent with that of the basic financial statements accepted by the Board of Trustees at the November 10, 2020 meeting and is a significant achievement given the impact of COVID-19 on college operations and the oversight on the federal financial aid and stimulus funding disbursed by the college.

Dr. Johnson congratulated and thanked the many staff members at the college for their daily vigilance and attention to detail to ensure that students have the much-needed financial aid to continue their education and for the oversight of the federal support we received in response to COVID-19.

By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Ulvila and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the acceptance of the FY2020 Federal Financial Aid and Grants Audit as audited by CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP.

2. Board Development Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair

Ms. Darrah reported that while the committee has not met since the last Board meeting, after speaking with Ms. Moore, and with the assistance of Ms. Barone, the committee will send a survey to the Board members. This survey will include topics such as goals for the Board, and seek feedback from trustees to assess the Board’s understanding of about its function and tasks. Dr. Johnson suggested to Ms. Darrah that she may want to review the Middle States requirements and guidelines, as there are tools that other institutions have used to receive this type of feedback from boards and this may provide data for the college’s Self-Study Report.

3. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair

i. Nepotism and Personal Relationships Policy – Information Item

ii. Removal of Consensual Relationships Policy – Information Item

iii. Academic Integrity Policy – Information Item

Ms. Darrah thanked the president, vice presidents, administrative support staff, and Ms. Parker for all of their work to support the Board Policy Oversight Committee.

Ms. Darrah reported that the committee met on March 16 to continue its review of all Board policies, making recommendations for revisions, adding new policies and removing out of 3 date or policies no longer needed from the from the Board policy manual. The committee is recommending two revisions to current policies and the removal of one, which are presented as information items.

The Nepotism Policy was adopted by the Board on October 12, 1999 and revised May 12, 2009. The committee recommends updating the policy and renaming it the Nepotism and Personal Relationships Policy to include students, provide definitions for clarity and include personal relationships.

As such, the committee recommends the Board to delete and remove the Consensual Relationships Policy, which was approved by the Board on May 8, 1995 and revised Mary 12, 2009 as the content of this policy has been incorporated into the revised Nepotism and Personal Relationships Policy.

Ms. Darrah reported that the Committee recommends updating the Academic Integrity Policy, which was originally adopted on June 8, 2005 and revised June 12, 2012, to expand the scope and applicability, and revise and add definitions to academic misconduct, especially with an increase in online learning and resources. Ms. Darrah noted that these three items will be brought back to the full board for approval at the May 11th public session.

4. Facilities Committee – Jerome W. Klasmeier, Committee Chair

Mr. Klasmeier reported that the Facilities Committee met via Zoom on April 6th to discuss the Facilities Master Plan Update, procurements, the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, and the Health & Life Sciences building.

Jean Stark of JMZ Architects and Planners presented an update to the committee regarding the facilities master plan. Given the changes in the timing of the county’s funding of the College’s projects, enrollment trends, the new strategic plan and now COVID, the administration felt it was prudent to update the college’s facilities master plan. The updated facilities master plan will come to the Board for approval before being submitted to the state.

The Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades reached a major milestone last month with the Foundation Board’s approval of the Guaranteed Maximum Price and the approval of the grading and building permits by the county. With these permit approvals, Mr. Klasmeier reported there is currently only one item remaining in the critical path of the project: potential delays in steel production. The Clauson Center is scheduled to be substantially complete in November with classes starting in January 2022.

Mr. Klasmeier noted the Health & Life Sciences building project continues to be on-schedule, within budget and on track to attain LEED gold certification. The committee’s next meeting is scheduled for May 18th at 3 p.m.

5. AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Lead Liaison

Mr. Ulvila asked Ms. Barone to read a thank you letter from a student to a donor who received the Anna and John Dragun Memorial scholarship on behalf of the AACC Foundation.

Mr. Ulvila reported that as of March 31, 2021, the fundraising total for the current fiscal year is just over $1.58 million in gifts and commitments, and total campaign revenue is just over $9.64 million in gifts and commitments.

Regarding the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the Foundation plans to hold a virtual groundbreaking event in May and invitations for this event are forthcoming. The Foundation continues to raise funds for the project and has exceeded its original goal of raising $4 million for the project.

Mr. Ulvila reported the AACC Foundation is working with a consulting firm regarding strategic planning and continues to collaborate with College leadership to develop a three-year strategic plan to guide the Foundation’s work in FY22-24. The Foundation’s Strategic Planning Committee will meet again in early May to discuss the next steps in the process.

Ms. Moore noted that the virtual groundbreaking for the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades will take place on Thursday morning and a small group of people were invited to attend the groundbreaking ceremony which will be filmed and available for public viewing.

6. Board Chair Report – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

i. Board Bylaws – Action Item

Dr. Johnson moved to approve the revised Board Bylaws, which was seconded by Mr. Ulvila. Ms. Moore opened the floor for discussion beginning with Article I.

Ms. Darrah noted that under Section 3(a) regular meetings, she thought that the changing date and times of regular meetings should be approved by a “majority vote of the board” rather than at the discretion of the chair. This change was supported by the Board.

Ms. Darrah noted that under Article I, meetings held in person, it would be best practice, in normal circumstances, for the Board to meet in person at a public place. The current draft language seems the default position is that meetings will be virtual unless the chair determines to hold a particular meeting in person or three trustees vote to change a virtual meeting to an in person meeting.

Ms. Moore stated that moving to Zoom would be easier for trustees to attend virtually and was in favor of keeping virtual meetings as the default. Ms. Moore noted that virtual meetings allows more people to attend, and there has been a significant increase in attendance when the Board went to virtual meetings.

Mr. Klasmeier stated there is benefit to seeing the audience and having the audience see the Board in action. He also noted with appointments of faculty and promotions there is a lot to be achieved by having faculty and staff recognized in a more formal forum than virtually.

Dr. Johnson agreed with Mr. Klasmeier about the benefits to meeting in-person, and if a Board member cannot attend in person, the Board member should not be penalized as not being present. Having the flexibility to attend virtually broadens the number of people interested in the serving. Dr. Johnson prefers in-person meetings as the primary mode but having the option for trustees to attend virtually so they can participate.

Ms. Barone suggested facilitating in-person meetings and have the meetings live-streamed for faculty, staff, students or trustees that may not be able to or choose not to attend in person. Kathy Campbell, the director of technology support services, was asked to provide her expertise on behalf of the College. Ms. Campbell reported that when using Zoom, everyone can see and hear each other via their computer/device. In order to facilitate an in-person and virtual meeting, the in-person participants would need a microphone so remote attendees may hear them. Ms. Campbell noted that a web camera would also be needed in the room for video. She noted that there are options but the College would need time to purchase the equipment and implement training.

Ms. Moore took a poll to see if the trustees preferred in-person meetings as the default. Six trustees favored in-person meetings, one trustee did not. The bylaws will reflect having in-person meetings as the default, and the procedures would allow a trustee to have the option to participate remotely for any meeting. Dr. Zoppi-Rodriguez asked for clarification about this and Ms. Moore responded that barring unforeseen circumstances like the pandemic, Board meetings will be in person and any trustee may participate virtually if they are not able to attend in person, and they do not have to be in the state of Maryland to attend remotely.

Mr. Klasmeier noted that he was not in favor of having staff and faculty appointments requiring Board confirmation listed as a potential item as part of a Consent Agenda in Section 3(o) subsection. Mr. Ulvila suggested to remove that line, and the Board was supportive of that change. Dr. Johnson recommended deleting the word “community” in Section 5(e) as Anne Arundel Community College should be referenced as the “College” throughout the document.

Dr. Johnson commented that Article II, Section 1(c) states that the President shall recommend to the Board appointment for all members of the instructional staff, administrative officers and such other employees that may be necessary for the efficient conduct of the affairs of the College. Dr. Johnson noted the Board has one employee, the President, and appointments of staff is one of the powers delegated to her. Dr. Johnson wanted to bring this to the President’s attention to see what her thoughts were about this statement.

Dr. Lindsay commented that she is aware of that and she works closely with the Board and provides regular updates. However, if the Board is amenable to reviewing this, she would appreciate it as it would demonstrate the operational authority granted to the President. The Board agreed to delete Article II, Section 1(c).

Ms. Moore discussed the new public participation section, Article IV. The desire for public comment was brought to her attention by Senator Simonaire because currently, there is no opportunity for public comment at the Board meetings. This Article allows the public to submit comments or testimony to an email address that the chair can review, and then forward to the Board to determine what should be discussed in public session. Any public comments received would be maintained by the College for one year from receipt. The Board was supportive of this addition.

Ms. Moore asked the Board to proceed with a vote on the motion to approve the bylaws with all of the changes discussed. A roll call was taken of the trustees to determine their vote, and the Board unanimously approved the revised bylaws with the changes discussed. Ms. Moore thanked the Board and general counsel, Erin Parker, for their work on this update to the bylaws, which was long overdue.

ii. Board Procedures – Action Item

Mr. Ulvila moved to approve the Board Procedures, which was seconded by Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez. Ms. Moore opened the floor for discussion.

Ms. Darrah commented that in the Procedures for Remote Attendance at Board Meetings, Section 1(F) was not consistent with the revised bylaws that were just passed (that the Chair may decide at the Chair’s sole discretion to hold a meeting in which all trustees will attend remotely). She also suggested that the Board should consider setting a maximum number of meetings that a Board member may attend remotely.

Dr. Zoppi-Rodriguez commented that some Board members have less flexibility due to work to attend in-person and need the option to call into a meeting. If the Board member is taking advantage of the virtual option, is ready and prepared for the meetings, reading all of the materials, providing input and being part of the team, then there should not be a cap of how many meetings to attend remotely. Being flexible would be better and not detrimental to the mission of the Board. Ms. Darrah responded that her suggestion is not limited to putting a limit on the maximum number of meetings that a Board member may attend remotely but also how many meetings trustees must attend. Ms. Moore confirmed that legislation states that trustees must attend 50% of meetings but did not believe legislation dictated if it is remote or in-person.

Ms. Darrah noted her concern is that if the preference of the Board is to have in-person meetings as the default, then the expectation would be the same in the procedures. Mr. Ulvila commented that the bylaws state remote participation is the same as in-person, and there is no limitation on the number of meetings you can attend remotely. After more discussion, the consensus of the Board was to be more inclusive, and allow trustees to participate remotely, and a call-in number should be included for all meetings. The Board agreed to delete Section 1(F) as it was not consistent with the revised bylaws just passed.

Regarding the Procedures for Public Meetings, Section 1(B), Mr. Klasmeier asked the question whether or not it should be the prerogative of the Chair to allow someone from the public to speak. The trustees discussed that with the revised bylaws, public has a way to submit written comments and testimony and share their thoughts on allowing the public to speak at the meetings. The Board reached a consensus to not modify Section 1(B) and adopt that Section as written. Ms. Moore asked the Board to proceed with a vote on the motion to approve the procedures with the modification to Procedures for Remote Attendance at Board Meetings.

A roll call was taken of the trustees to determine their vote, and the motion passed (six in favor, one against) to approve the Procedures for Public Meetings and Procedures for Remote Attendance at Board Meetings.

iii. Nominating Committee

Ms. Darrah reported that the nominating committee’s slate of officers for next year is Ms. Moore returning as chair and Dr. Johnson serving as vice chair.

VIII. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay reported that AACC was ranked #1 community college in the country by Academic Influence in its first-ever rankings of two-year colleges, and was recently recognized as a Military Friendly School for its efforts to improve the lives of veterans and military personnel. Dr. Lindsay provided an update on the searches for the Vice President for Learning and Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer positions, and announced the hiring of Dr. Richard Kralevich as its first Vice President of Information Technology. AACC presented its budget to the County Executive on March 30th and the presentation was well received. The next step in the process will be to present to the County Council on May 4th.
  2. Strategic Plan Update – Dr. Michael H. Gavin, Vice President for Learning
    Dr. Gavin stated that in the past strategic plan and the current one, the College looked at ways to build upon the national paradigms and pathways, and focus on the classroom with regards to student success. The College has received numerous accolades as a result of its work and is a leader in equity, teaching and learning. Completion rates have increased as a result of the work of the faculty and staff are doing, putting students first, and focusing on relationships. The implementation of the Assistant Deans ensured there were a group of individuals focusing on student success with regard to programs and equity, diversity, and inclusion. The development of Model Courses, which focus on equity, diversity and inclusion pedagogy in high enrollment courses, is a result of the faculty’s commitment to professional development and student success. These initiatives have moved the needle with some of the key performance indicators, such as retention and completion, when disaggregated by race and gender. Dr. Gavin presented a summary of accomplishments and improvements after implementing the Assistant Dean model. He noted significant increases in transfer agreements and the fill rate per section, which has a fiscal impact on the College as well as more efficiency. Dr. Johnson asked about the transfer agreements and Dr. Gavin responded that agreements listed were for each fiscal year, and had over 100 transfer agreements in the past two years, which is a significant increase. Dr. Gavin reported that the College’s current strategic planning efforts and unit level assessment are aligned, and the planning, research and institutional assessment office has a database to track the progress and outcomes, which is a Middle States requirement assessment. Dr. Gavin reported that the College has a new key performance indicators (KPI) dashboard in Tableau, and the interface will allow users to view data and progress toward the strategic plan. Dr. Johnson asked Dr. Gavin if there could be demonstration of the KPI dashboard for the Board, and Dr. Gavin said that could be arranged for a future meeting. Mr. Klasmeier asked Dr. Gavin to identify what the three programs were that the College ranked number one in the state and nationally. Dr. Gavin responded that the three number one programs in the country are: Computer Information Systems, LPN/Nursing Program and Information Technology. The two ranked in the state are LPN and Computer Information Systems. Dr. Gavin also noted three programs in the top ten: Computer Science, Business Administration, and Business Transfer. The culinary program is in the top 50, but has been as high as #12. In reference to AACC’s ranked programs, Mr. Klasmeier asked Dr. Gavin how AACC’s physician assistant program ranks. Dr. Gavin responded that he did not know and would get back to Mr. Klasmeier.
  3. Monthly Update on Accreditation – Dr. Gregory R. Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee
    Dr. Schrader reported that the College is achieving the first major milestone of accreditation process, the completion of the draft self-study design. Dr. Robert Bonfiglio, the Middle States liaison, will have a virtual site visit on April 28. He will meet with groups of people during his visit, including members of the Board of Trustees and host an open forum for the general college community. Mr. Ulvila asked if talking points could be provided to the Board members prior to the visit, and Dr. Schrader said they would be provided, in addition to the standards and timeline of the accreditation process. Dr. Johnson commented that one of the things Middles States will be looking at is how does the Board assess its performance to ensure the mission of the College is being fulfilled. He suggested the talking points may include some indicators on how the Board may do that.
  4. Student Government Association – Ryan Kim, President
    Mr. Kim reported on SGA activities during the past few months and on future projects.
  5. Academic Forum/Council – Myra Dennis, Chair (no report)
  6. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President (no report)
  7. Professional and Support Staff Organization – Anne Bashore, President (no report)
  8. Administrative Staff Organization – Dr. Danny M. Hoey, Jr., President (no report)
  9. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Dr. Lindsay reported the 441st Session of the Maryland General Assembly adjourned on April 10th. MACC will provide the College with a written report about the 2021 session and she will share a summary of that report with the full Board when received.

B. Action Items

  1. Approval of Revisions to Strategic Plan Engagement Matters II: Excellence through Innovation (FY 2021 - FY 2024) – Dr. Michael H.Gavin, Vice President for Learning
    Dr. Gavin asked the Board to approve the proposed revisions to the College's strategic plan and add antiracism to two strategic plan objectives: engagement and resources. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Ulvila and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved Revisions to Strategic Plan Engagement Matters II: Excellence through Innovation (FY 2021 - FY 2024).
  2. Approval of Award of Contract for Microsoft Azure Virtual Machines – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Dr. Patterson asked the Board to approve the purchase of Microsoft Azure virtual machines to run Windows Virtual Desktop, a desktop application virtualization service running on the Microsoft Azure cloud. Information Services completed a cloud assessment that identified opportunities to improve system reliability and performance while modernizing our computing infrastructure. The Windows Virtual Desktop will support students, faculty and staff in a remote learning and working environment with the benefits, such as flexibility, reduced downtime and business continuity, scalability and standardization. This purchase will provide the College with the ability to utilize Azure virtual machines for a three-year term and the College will utilize virtual machines to support students, faculty and staff. Dr. Johnson asked whether the College is certain that it would have enough end-of-year funds for this purchase or whether the College should wait until after June 30. Ms. Beardmore responded that the College has a good estimate of the end-of-year resources, and there is sufficient funding available to move forward with this purchase. Dr. Johnson asked if the College could use the CARES money for this purchase and use the end-of-year funding for the next procurement item (services). Mr. Andrew Little, associate vice president for learning resources management, responded that with the federal funds, the College must align the service period over the use of the assets or software, and the College is not confident that the federal dollars would be available for the full contract term. It would be risky to bring the item forward as a CARES purchase, so the College is using the CARES dollars to bring the infrastructure necessary to launch it. Dr. Johnson commented he thought the College could request an extension for CARES funding to use the funds over that period of time. Mr. Little responded that is true for computers but because the virtual work stations are procured over a service period the extension might not cover them. Ms. Beardmore clarified the extension on the CARES Act is generally, it is for the College to spend the money, not an extension for the contract. Dr. Johnson appreciated the clarification. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Dr. Zoppi-Rodriguez, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the Award of Contract for Microsoft Azure Virtual Machines from Bell Techlogix, Inc., of Columbia, Maryland, in an amount not to exceed $693,590.
  3. Approval of Award of Contract for Microsoft Designated Support Engineering – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Dr. Patterson asked the Board to approve the purchase of Microsoft Designated Support Engineering services to aid in the deployment of virtualization service running on the Microsoft Azure cloud. The College is seeking support focused on education, optimization, assessment and monitoring. Microsoft Designated Support Engineering will supplement the current staffing with access to Microsoft experts and training. The support services are tailored to the College’s unique needs and systems to leverage targeted support in the areas most impactful to the college. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Barone, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the Award of Contract for Microsoft Designated Support Engineering services from Microsoft Corporation, of Redmond, Washington, in an amount not to exceed $140,800.
  4. Approval of Contract for the Purchase of Medication Dispensing Units and Related Software – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President for Learning Resources Management
    Ms. Beardmore asked the Board to approve a contract for furniture, fixtures, and equipment (FFE) for the new Health and Life Sciences Building to purchase seven table top Pyxis Medication Dispensing units, one for each of the nursing labs in the new building. These are the same units used in hospitals, and students will be able to experience logging into the system and checking out medications for patients using the same system that they will find in healthcare facilities. The units will come with software that allows the units to network with each other. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved the Award of Contract for the Purchase of Medication Dispensing Units and related Software and one-year extended warranty to Medical Shipment LLC of Skokie, Illinois, in an amount not to exceed $188,084.

IX. NEW BUSINESS

Ms. Moore made the announcement that a new Board of Trustees Member, Ms. Joyce Price-Jones, was selected by Senator Simonaire and approved by the Governor to fill the position made vacant by Kathleen Johnson.

X. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Ms. Moore advised that the next Board meeting will be May 11, 2021.

XI. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:40 p.m.

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on April 13, 2021 at 3:30 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to section 3-305(b)(7) and 3-305(b)(8) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code Section 3-305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, Paula J. Darrah, Briana Barone, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., and Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr. Dr. Dawn Lindsay, Melissa Beardmore, Dr. Michael Gavin, Dr. Felicia Patterson, Erin Parker, and Monica Rausa Williams were also present. Jerome Klasmeier joined at 3:40 p.m. Topics discussed legal advice and consult with staff regarding pending and potential litigation. The meeting began at 3:34 p.m. and ended at 3:58 p.m.

May 11, 2021, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Briana “Bri” Barone; James H. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.; Joyce Price-Jones; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; and Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Ph.D.

I. CALL TO ORDER

The open session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Moore at 3:15 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

II. VOTE TO CLOSE MEETING

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Barone, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board unanimously approved to close the open session and move to closed session.

III. MEETING RECONVENE FOR PUBLIC SESSION AT 4:00 P.M.

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Ms. Moore at 4:00 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

IV. CALL TO ORDER AND APPROVAL OF AGENDA

By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the May 11, 2021 Board of Trustees public session agenda.

V. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

A. Delegate Shaneka T. Henson, Esquire

Ms. Moore welcomed Delegate Henson, who was pleased to present an official citation to the College on behalf of herself, Senator Sarah Elfreth and Delegate Dana Jones for being ranked the number one community college in the country by Academic Influence. Ms. Moore thanked Delegate Henson as well as Senator Sarah Elfreth and Delegate Dana Jones. She extended her appreciation to Dr. Lindsay and the entire college for their work. Trustee Klasmeier also praised the AACC Foundation for the work it does for the College as well.

B. New Trustee Introduction: Joyce Price-Jones

Ms. Moore introduced and welcomed new Board of Trustees member Joyce Price-Jones and shared her extensive background and experience, which she noted will be a great benefit the college. Before continuing with the agenda, Ms. Moore announced that Dr. Lindsay would not be attending the meeting and that Vice President Beardmore would give the President’s reports.

VI. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Minutes of the April 13, 2021, Board of Trustees Closed Session Meeting

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the minutes of the April 13, 2021, Board of Trustees closed session.

B. Minutes of the April 13, 2021, Board of Trustees Public Session Meeting

By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the minutes of the April 13, 2021, Board of Trustees public session.

VII. FACULTY PROMOTION, TENURE AND EMERITUS

A. Faculty Promotion

Dr. Marshall asked the Board for approval of the President’s recommendations for the award of faculty promotion. Dr. Marshall reviewed the process for faculty for promotion and certification of the process. Faculty recommended for promotion will advance in rank effective August 16, 2021. The increase in salary for faculty members approved for promotion is equivalent to two full steps in salary, which including FICA, is $60,327.00 for FY22.

By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Barone, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the motion for Faculty Promotion effective August 16, 2021: to Assistant Professor – Katherine M. Keough, Physical Science and Stephanie Smith-Baker, Medical Assisting; to Associate Professor – Ellen M. Asbury, Nursing, Mary M. Bachkosky, J.D., Legal Studies, Dr. Michelle Bentley, Education, Dr. Jeffrey J. Feuer, Mathematics, Dr. Julie L. Grignon, Psychology, Cedric R. Harris, Computer Information Systems, Alice C. Jackson, Nursing, Theodore J. Johnson, Visual Arts, Theresa I. Kotkiewicz, Business Management, Dr. Deborah A. Levine, Astronomy, Carrie E. Long, Biology, Jessica Mattingly, Communications, and Dr. Krista Y. White, Biology; to Full Professor – Dr. April E. Copes, Communications, Dr. Gina M. Finelli, Sociology, Dr. Lawrence Gray, World Languages, Dr. Uzma Qureshi, Economics, and Deborah Tolliver, Nursing.

B. Faculty Tenure

Dr. Marshall asked the Board for approval of the President’s recommendations for the award of tenure. Dr. Marshall reviewed the process for the award of tenure and 3 certification of the process. Tenure will be awarded as of August 16, 2021. Dr. Marshall stated that there would be no fiscal implications. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the motion for tenure effective August 16, 2021: to Dr. Tammy L. Domanski, Biology, Dr. Mark A. Farinha, Biology, Deborah L. Hammond, Health, Fitness, and Exercise Studies, Robert R. Lowe, Architecture & Interior Design, Denise M. Lyons, Nursing, Adrian L. Pringle, Cybersecurity, Networking, & Digital Forensics, and Cynthia L. Woods, Computer Science.

C. Emeritus

Dr. Marshall asked the Board for approval of the President’s recommendation for the award of professor emeritus to Dr. M. Stephen Ailstock. Dr. Marshall reviewed the process for the award of emeritus and certification of the process. Dr. Marshall provided an overview of Dr. Ailstock’s 41 years of service to the college, emphasizing his significant contributions to the college and exemplary qualifications for emeritus status. By motion of Mr. Klasmeier, seconded by Ms. Barone, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the motion for award of professor emeritus to Dr. Ailstock in recognition of his significant contributions to Anne Arundel Community College during his tenure at the college. Mr. Klasmeier shared his personal experience working with Dr. Ailstock on the use of dredge material, chicken manure, and food waste as a top soil replacement product and commented on Dr. Ailstock’s outstanding qualifications. Ms. Barone shared her congratulations and shared her personal experience with biology coursework using his textbook and the quality of the coursework. Ms. Barone shared her gratitude for Dr. Ailstock’s contributions to the program. Ms. Moore shared her congratulations to Dr. Ailstock as well.

VIII. BOARD CHAIR AND COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Reports for May

1. Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

Dr. Johnson stated that the April committee meeting was cancelled and in lieu of the in-person meeting, committee members received a written report on April 28, 2021 with an update on the following topics: FY2021 Financial Status Report, FY2021 Estimated Year End Spending, and FY2022 Budget Update. In regards to the FY2021 Financial Status Report, the committee received reports on the operating budget as well as auxiliary, enterprise and restricted funds as of March 31, 2021. Both funds are within the appropriation authority and sufficient fiscal resources are available to address critical year end spending needs. Regarding FY2021 Estimated Year End Spending, the committee was given a summary of the estimated year end spending plan totaling $2.8 million dollars for various projects. Of that amount, approximately $1.18 million will be brought before the Board for authorization in public session. An update was given on the FY2022 budget. The county executive’s budget includes an increase in funding for the college of $1 million. The college’s request was for $4 million. The difference of $3 million is funded by using additional state funds and expenditure reductions. Ms. Beardmore will be giving an update in her report on the college’s presentation to the county council.

2. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair

Ms. Darrah reported that last month the committee submitted three information items for review which will be brought forward as action items.

The committee is recommending two revisions to current policies and removal of one. The committee is recommending that the Board approve a revised Nepotism and Personal Relationships Policy. AACC currently has a Board approved Nepotism Policy adopted on October 12, 1999, which was previously revised on May 12, 2009. The recommendation is to update the policy to include students, provide definitions for clarity, and include the category of Personal Relationships.

The committee recommends the removal of the Consensual Relationships Policy approved by the Board on May 9, 1995 and revised on May 12, 2009. The content of the Consensual Relationships Policy has been incorporated into the revised Nepotism and Personal Relationships Policy. If the Board approves the deletion of the Consensual Relationships Policy and the removal of that policy from the Board Policy Manual, the effective date will be May 11, 2021.

The committee recommends that the Board approve a revised Academic Integrity Policy. The current Board approved Academic Integrity Policy was adopted on June 8, 2004 and previously revised on June 12, 2012. The revisions include expanding the scope and applicability of the policy, and revising and adding definitions to the terms of academic misconduct, which address concerns associated with an increase in online learning and online resources. Dr. Johnson moved to approve the revised Nepotism and Personal Relationships Policy, which was seconded by Mr. Klasmeier.

Dr. Johnson commented that the title needs a correction and should be “Anne Arundel Community College Board of Trustees Policy Manual” noting that the word “College” was omitted. A roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, and the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the revised Nepotism and Personal Relationships Policy, effective May 11, 2021. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the deletion and removal of the Consensual Relationships Policy, effective May 11, 2021.

Ms. Moore moved to approve the revised Academic Integrity Policy, which was seconded by Mr. Klasmeier. Dr. Johnson asked if the College has a parallel academic 5 integrity policy for faculty. Ms. Parker responded that there is not a separate scholarly misconduct policy for faculty; however, she stated that this type of policy could be added to the list of policies to be considered for development. A roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, and the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the revised Academic Integrity Policy effective May 11, 2021.

3. Board Nominating Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair

Ms. Darrah stated that according to the Board bylaws and as announced at the April Board meeting, the Nominating Committee recommends for the office of chair, Sandra E. Moore, and for the office of vice chair, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.

By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the election of Sandra E. Moore for the office of chair, and Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., for the office of vice chair of the Anne Arundel Community College Board of Trustees for the term beginning July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022.

Ms. Barone offered her thanks to Ms. Moore and Dr. Johnson for their service to the Board and congratulated them on being nominated for office for the next year. On behalf of herself and Dr. Johnson, Ms. Moore thanked the Board for its faith in them to serve as officers of the Board.

4. Report of Trustees’ Liaison to the AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Lead Liaison

Mr. Ulvila asked Ms. Barone to share a thank you letter from a student to the Board in appreciation of receiving a scholarship.

Mr. Ulvila reported that the fundraising total for the current fiscal year as of April 30, 2021 was over $1.67 million in gifts and commitments and total campaign revenue was over $9.64 million in gifts and commitments.

Mr. Ulvila provided a reminder that the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades virtual groundbreaking ceremony is Monday, May 24th at 4:30 p.m. and encouraged everyone to join the Foundation Board, college leadership and donors for this virtual Zoom event. Amanda Turner may be contacted for the Zoom link.

The AACC Foundation continues to work with a consulting firm to develop a 3-year strategic plan to guide its work for FY22-24. The Foundation’s Strategic Planning Committee has been briefed on the first draft of the plan. A summary of the working draft will be shared with the Board at next month’s meeting for feedback.

IX. PRESIDENT’S REPORT – Vice President Melissa A. Beardmore on behalf of Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

  1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Ms. Beardmore introduced the college’s first Vice President for Information Technology, Dr. Richard Kralevich and Dr. Alycia Marshall as the Interim Vice President of Learning. Ms. Beardmore shared that planning is underway for the end of the semester, final exams and the Car-mencement graduation celebration parade on Thursday, May 27th and encouraged everyone to attend. Ms. Beardmore provided an update on current searches. The search committee for the Provost/Vice President of Learning has interviewed the first round of candidates. Three finalists will be invited to visit the campus virtually in the beginning of June which will include an open forum for faculty and staff. The search committee for the Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer will review candidates and schedule the first round of interviews for the end of May. Finalists will be invited to visit campus virtually in mid-June. Ms. Beardmore reported the County Executive presented his FY 22 budget on April 30th. The college presented its budget to the County Council on May 4th, asking the council to maintain the County Executive’s operating budget request and to restore capital funding for the Information Technology Capital Project. The County Council has until June 15th to approve a final budget. Ms. Beardmore expressed her gratitude for the trustees of the Board who were able to attend.
    i. Revisions to College Manual (Information Item)
    Ms. Beardmore reported that the College has reviewed its processes to determine what college manual changes should be forwarded to the Board for review and approval. Currently, the college manual includes personnel processes and procedures, and charters for The Faculty Organization, Administrative Staff Organization and Professional and Support Staff Organization, the Academic Forum charter and the Student Government Association constitution. All substantive changes to any section currently require board approval. Legal counsel, AACC staff, and the constituency group leaders reviewed the manual and its revision process and determined that the constituency group charters and bylaws, the Academic Forum charter and the Student Government Association constitution are operational and do not rise to the policy level of requiring board approval to amend or revise. The proposed revision is to remove those charters and to have each organization develop its own process for amendments and revisions, which may be approved by the organization, president and vice presidents. This item will be brought forward as an action item at the June meeting.
  2. Enrollment and Dashboard Update – Dr. Felicia L. Patterson, Vice President, Learner Support Services
    Dr. Patterson reported on Winter and Spring 2021 Enrollment Reports. Winter credit headcount (representing actual number of students in credit courses) represented an increase of 6.4%, an increase of 90 students putting the college on par with Winter 2019 enrollment numbers. Winter FTE (number of student credit hours divided by 30 credits) of 173 is an increase of 12 FTE, 7.5% over Winter 2020. Spring enrollment reflected a decrease in headcount by 5.1%. At a headcount of 10,548, the college saw a decline of 568 students from Spring 2020. Dr. Patterson explained that nationally community colleges experienced the greatest decline in the spring since the pandemic, nationally reflecting a decline of 11.3%. New national numbers will be available in June. Dr. Patterson shared data breaking down the enrollment numbers for Spring 2021 in comparison to prior years. Ms. Moore asked if the College knows how the percentage of enrollment by race or ethnicity numbers compare to the county as a whole. Dr. Patterson offered to get those numbers and to share them with the Board.
  3. Monthly Update on Accreditation – Dr. Gregory R. Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee
    Dr. Schrader reported that the Steering Committee met to review the final edits and recommendations of the self-study design. Dr. Schrader explained that the final self-study design was sent to the Middle States liaison who then met virtually with Dr. Lindsay, the Board of Trustees, the Steering Committee and the college community to discuss the accreditation process. The committee received some suggestions for minor changes along with praise for the work on the design. The committee is currently working to address the suggestions. When the final revision is approved, it will be shared with the work teams to begin the writing of the self-study report. On May 7th, work teams submitted their first status report to the steering committee to be reviewed at their next committee meeting on May 14th. In preparation for the work ahead, the committee continues to receive professional development and organize logistics for the process.
  4. Student Government Association – Ryan Kim, President
    Mr. Kim reported on highlights of some of the thirteen projects completed by the Student Government Association which focused on such topics as Earth Day, diversity, deaf community awareness, stress relief for students, understanding legal terms, returning to campus night, and in collaboration with El Camino Community College of California, the Student Government Association hosted the 1st Annual Community College Conference with more than 600 registrations and speakers from Amazon, Stanford, Berkeley and more. Future projects include working with the Asian community, a workshop on racebased stress, a Bingo party, approval of club budgets and the Student Government Association elections. Ms. Moore expressed her thanks to Mr. Kim for the hard work that he and the Student Government Association have done this year.
  5. Academic Forum/Council – Myra Dennis, Chair (no report)
    There was no report from the Academic Forum.
  6. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President
    Dr. Tannenbaum reported that The Faculty Organization is wrapping up the year and will provide an update in June. Dr. Tannenbaum introduced the incoming officers for The Faculty Organization: Dr. Nicole Williams, President; Kymberly Jackson, Vice President; and Dr. Deborah Levine, Recorder.
  7. Professional and Support Staff Organization – Anne Bashore, President
    Ms. Bashore reported that the Community Service Committee coordinated efforts to support Cell Phones for Soldiers, the Blue Ribbon Project, and the college’s food pantry. Ms. Bashore reported that in conjunction with the college manual revisions, representatives are considering a motion to amend the PSSO bylaws to allow for the new approval and revision process. A vote will be called for in late May. Ms. Bashore reported that nominations and elections for FY 22 are currently underway and expects results to be published by June 1. She will report the results to the board in June.
  8. Administrative Staff Organization – Dr. Danny M. Hoey, Jr., President (no report)
    There was no report from the Administrative Staff Organization.
  9. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Vice President, Melissa A. Beardmore on behalf of President, Dr. Dawn Lindsay
    Ms. Beardmore reported that a summary of the 2021 MACC Legislative Committee report is included in the board packet and highlights the legislation that affects community colleges such as state aid to community colleges, capital budgets, provisions for funding collective bargaining transfer and financial aid. The next meeting is scheduled for June 23, 2021.

B. Action Items

  1. Approval of New and Revised Lab Fees – Dr. Alycia A. Marshall, Interim Vice President for Learning
    Dr. Marshall requested that the Board approve a revision to lab fees as outlined in Exhibit 1, revising the FY 2022 lab fees approved in the annual budget to reflect the current operating environment. Dr. Marshall stated that the overall fiscal impact is neutral as the college budgets lab fee revenue to be fully spent on the purchase of supplies and services consumed by students. It is anticipated that this will save students over $35,000 in the fall semester. Ms. Darrah complimented the thorough review and the presentation in terms of transparency. Ms. Barone commended the work and expressed her personal gratitude for the revision. Mr. Klasmeier asked to clarify that the reduction of fees is a result of students not physically being on campus to which Dr. Marshall replied that yes, the majority of the fees are based on the changes due to online instruction. By motion of Ms. Barone, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the revision to lab fees for FY 2022.
  2. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of Digital Library Subscriptions – Dr. Alycia Marshall, Interim Vice President for Learning
  3. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of Task Trainers – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President for Learning Resources Management
  4. Approval of Award of Contract for the Purchase of 3D Anatomy Tables – Melissa A. Beardmore, Vice President for Learning Resources Management
    Before moving on to the three items for approval, Ms. Moore asked to have them presented as a consent agenda. Dr. Marshall asked the Board to approve the award of contract for Lyrasis for the management of digital subscriptions on behalf of AACC. She explained the history and benefits to the College of participating in this group purchasing agreement, which has resulted in lower prices for subscriptions and consolidated invoices. Dr. Marshall asked for approval for subscriptions purchased through the Memorandum of Understanding in an amount not to exceed $250,000 during FY2022. Ms. Beardmore explained that she would be giving a presentation to consolidate agenda items IX.B.3 and IX.B.4, both which fall under Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment for the Health and Life Sciences building. Ms. Beardmore reported the balance of the funds available is $3.57 million and that after both items are approved, there will remain a balance of $3.2 million. Ms. Beardmore described the first item for approval, the purchase of Task Trainers for individual programs, which are primarily used by the health sciences program. These task trainers are important for practicing skills and are currently shared by multiple programs. The purchasing of additional task trainers for individual programs will increase their availability and ease scheduling conflicts. 10 Ms. Beardmore described the next item for which approval is requested, the 3D Anatomy Tables, which offer greater functionality than current equipment and give students the ability to dissect 3D models scanned from actual patients. Two tables are requested which give two groups of students access to completing activities at the same time. Mr. Klasmeier asked for a point of clarification, stating that since the agenda went out with these items as action items, he asked if converting these to a consent agenda would be a problem. If items are going to be grouped as a consent agenda, it should be listed on the agenda and not changed during the meeting. Ms. Moore deferred to General Counsel. Ms. Parker stated that the bylaws do not prohibit this action so long as a Board member can pull an item if they want to vote differently on a particular item. Ms. Parker suggested that in the future, the consent agenda should be listed and shared in advance for clarity. By motion of Dr. Johnson seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously voted to approve the award of the contract for digital resources subscription management services to the Maryland Digital Library agent Lyrasis, in an amount not to exceed $250,000; the award of contract for the purchase of task trainers to American 3B Scientific in the amount not to exceed $125,882; and the award of contract for the purchase of two Anatomage 3D anatomy tables to Anatomage Inc. in an amount not to exceed $161,400.

X. NEW BUSINESS

Ms. Moore made the announcement that a new Board of Trustees Member, Ms. Joyce Price-Jones, was selected by Senator Simonaire and approved by the Governor to fill the position made vacant by Kathleen Johnson.

XI. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Ms. Moore advised that the next board meeting will be June 8, 2021.

XI. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 5:32 p.m.

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on May 11, 2021 at 3:15 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to § 3-305(b)(2) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to §§ 3-305(b)(7) and (b)(8) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code Section 3-305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Briana Barone, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.; A. Joyce PriceJones, Jerome Klasmeier, Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., and Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez. Melissa Beardmore, Dr. Rick Kralevich, Dr. Alycia Marshall, Vollie Melson, Dr. Felicia Patterson, Erin Parker, and Monica Rausa Williams were also present. Paula Darrah joined at 3:21 p.m. Vollie Melson left at 3:29 p.m. Topics discussed included public records search regarding donor and individuals to be named related to a naming opportunity. The meeting began at 3:21 p.m. and ended at 3:42 p.m.

June 8, 2021, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.; A. Joyce Price-Jones; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. Call to Order and Approval of Agenda – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4:00 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

By motion of Ms. Darrah, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the June 8, 2021, Board of Trustees public session agenda.

II. Welcome and Introductions – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

III. Recognitions – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Ms. Moore recognized outgoing Trustee Paula J. Darrah for her outstanding leadership and contributions to the Board of Trustees as the Vice Chair of the Board, Chair of the Policy Oversight Committee and Chair of the Board Development Committee. Under her leadership, the Board Policy Oversight Committee made significant progress in the review and revision of board policies, creating a more holistic and inclusive approach to policy development at the College. As Chair of the Board Development Committee, Ms. Darrah increased board accountability for its goals and facilitated opportunities for professional development and growth in the areas of accountability, diversity, equity and inclusion. A plaque in honor of Ms. Darrah’s contributions to the Board was sent to her office.

Ms. Darrah expressed her gratitude for the opportunity to serve on the Board alongside the other trustees and to work with the College administration. Mr. Klasmeier shared his gratitude for Ms. Darrah’s service as well.

B. Ms. Moore also recognized outgoing student trustee Briana “Bri” Barone. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, Chair Moore expressed gratitude for Ms. Barone’s outstanding service and contributions to the Board, recognizing her as a tireless advocate for students and ambassador for the College. Ms. Barone served on the Board Development Committee and was a liaison to the Anne Arundel Community College Foundation Board of Directors and has been an active and enthusiastic participant, benefiting the College and the Foundation Board. Ms. Moore wished Ms. Barone success in her future and noted a plaque honoring her service and contributions to the Board was sent to her home.

IV. Consent Agenda

Ms. Moore stated the purpose of the consent agenda is to put forth items normally voted on separately and to offer them up together for approval. Ms. Moore reminded the Board that all information for the consent agenda including the minutes for approval, Ratification of Award of Degrees and Certificates for Academic Year 2020-2021 and procurements were made available in advance to the Board through Diligent and stated that no requests were received in advance to pull any item from the consent agenda.

Ms. Moore stated that Dr. Johnson had submitted in advance of the meeting two questions regarding the consent agenda and received a reply for each. Ms. Moore requested that Dr. Johnson read his questions and that Ms. Beardmore share the responses with the full Board.

Dr. Johnson stated that in regards to the procurements, some data was missing from a few of the items; specifically, that a list of bidders was provided but that the summary did not indicate the number of minority bidders. Dr. Johnson stated the importance of consistently providing this information as often as possible.

Ms. Beardmore responded that the SUN building roof is the only procurement not being awarded based solely on costs and the only award which could have been influenced by minority participation. The remaining procurements were awarded solely on costs through a bid or existing cooperative contract. Ms. Beardmore stated that conversations were happening in regards to how the College can track for minority business enterprise and the volume of minority business conducted by the College to track spending and will work out the details on how to accomplish this.

Dr. Johnson stated that in regards to the state relief grant, students must document a loss of employment or hardship caused by COVID-19 to qualify, and he wants to ensure the College is doing a screening to follow the requirements of the grant.

Ms. Beardmore responded that implementation of the procurements for tool kits and computers is underway, and that an agreement between the students and the College is under development with legal counsel, which will include a statement of acknowledgement by the student that they lost a job or were negatively affected by COVID-19 to receive a toolkit or laptop. Ms. Beardmore emphasized that while the equipment will be made available on a first-come, first-served basis, it will be within the eligibility of those programs, ensuring documentation and compliance with the requirements of the programs.

Mr. Klasmeier asked if the laptop is issued to a student, will it become their property with no obligation to return it. Ms. Beardmore and Ms. Parker confirmed that was correct.

By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Ms. Price-Jones, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the consent agenda:

  • Approval of the minutes of the May 11, 2021 Board of Trustees Closed Session;
  • Approval of the minutes of the May 11, 2021 Board of Trustees Public Session;
  • Approval of the minutes of the June 3, 2021 Board of Trustees Closed Session;
  • Ratification of award of degrees and certificates for Academic Year 2021 conferred by the faculty upon the students recommended by the faculty for graduation and certified by the registrar as having fulfilled the requirements of the program of study for which the degree or certificate was conferred through summer 2020 and the 2020-2021 academic year;
  • Approval of award of contract for data communications equipment annual maintenance to CDW-Government LLC of Vernon Hills, Illinois in an amount not to exceed $189,666;
  • Approval of award of contract for the purchase of audiovisual equipment and services from Lee Hartman and Sons, Inc., of Baltimore, Maryland in an amount not to exceed $507,164;
  • Approval of award of contract for Microsoft volume licensing renewal from Bell Techlogix, Inc., of Columbia, Maryland, in an amount not to exceed $181,543;
  • Approval of award of contract for the purchase of student tool kits for the purchase of 206 toolkits for student distribution to The NEFCO Corporation of Capitol Heights, Maryland, in an amount not to exceed $175,000;
  • Approval of award of contract for the purchase of laptop computers carrying bags and wireless mice for student distribution to Dell Marketing, L.P., of Round Rock, Texas, in an amount not to exceed $439,506;
  • Approval of award of contract for the purchase of six high fidelity Nursing Anne Simulators to Pocket Nurse of Monaca, Pennsylvania in an amount not-to-exceed $202,359;
  • Approval of award of contract for the Student Union Roof replacement contract for the roof replacement of the Student Union building to Adelphia Contracting Inc., of Bowie, Maryland in an amount not to exceed $859,870.

V. Board Chair and Committee Reports

A. Reports for June

1. Board Development Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair – Report

Ms. Darrah reported that a survey was sent to the Board, responses were received, and the results were compiled and provided to the Chair. The assessments will be shared next year and help in developing a future agenda for this committee. Ms. Darrah thanked everyone involved in the creation of the survey.

2. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair

Ms. Darrah reported the committee met on June 1 to continue its review of all board policies to make recommendations for revisions, additions of new policies and removal of out-of-date policies and procedures from the Board Policy Manual.

The committee recommended the revision of the Reduction in Force policy which was adopted February 24, 1993. The committee recommended updating and renaming the policy the Financial Exigency and Reduction in Force Policy along with the removal of the procedures as the College has developed procedures which align with the revised policy.

Ms. Moore expressed gratitude for the work done by college counsel, the constituency groups, and staff for their feedback.

The committee recommended that the policy be approved by the current board members and not delayed until the fall. The Chair may call a special meeting of the Board later this month for this purpose as well as to address other matters.

3. Facilities Committee – Jerome W. Klasmeier, Committee Chair

Mr. Klasmeier reported that the committee met twice on May 18 and June 1 and discussed procurements, the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades, the Health & Life Sciences building, and Facilities Master Plan update.

Mr. Klasmeier reported that construction is underway and site work began last month on the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled trades and that the concrete slab has been poured. Mr. Klasmeier was pleased to report that steel production delays are no longer an issue. The center is scheduled for substantial completion in November with classes starting in January 2022.

Mr. Klasmeier reported that the Health & Life Sciences building continues to be on schedule, within budget and on track for LEED gold certification and that the occupancy permit has been received and final completion of the project has occurred. No issues are expected with the delivery of furniture from Maryland Correctional Enterprises.

Mr. Klasmeier reported that the committee reviewed the Addendum to the 2016 Facilities Master Plan. The committee provided feedback on the key assumptions and recommendations within the draft report.

Mr. Klasmeier expressed his gratitude for the work completed by Jean Stark of JMZ Architects on the Addendum to the 2016 Facilities Master Plan.

Ms. Beardmore presented an overview on the 2016 Facilities Master Plan, which is completed as required by the state, and stated that the addendum to the plan reflects major changes to the plan. Ms. Beardmore explained that the addendum contains current information on enrollment projections, student instructional needs and information learned during the pandemic. The study is foundational to the facilities planning process in regards to vetting, prioritization, and funding. Ms. Beardmore explained that capital projects are planned using enrollment and staffing data to determine space needs and reflect the strategic priorities of the College.

Should the Board approve the addendum it will be submitted to the Maryland Higher Education Commission and other appropriate state agencies. Recommendations as a result of the plan will come forth to the Board as part of the Fiscal Year 2023 budget process.

Mr. Ulvila moved to approve the Addendum to the 2016 Facilities Master Plan, which was seconded by Mr. Klasmeier.

Dr. Johnson expressed concern over the future enrollment projection of 10% over the next 10 years when the College has seen a decline over the past five years, and notes the report’s references to impact studies without supporting data. Dr. Johnson stated his preference to have foundational data in support of those assumptions.

Mr. Klasmeier stated that the question had come up in the committee and that a written response from the administration is available and asked that Ms. Beardmore provide this to Dr. Johnson. Ms. Beardmore shared that the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) provides projections for the state community colleges based on data and assumptions, and MHEC’s projection for the College was a 22% enrollment growth. Ms. Beardmore stated that the 10% growth allowed in the addendum came from assumptions embedded in the 2016 study, which have been updated and reflect moderate growth for facilities planning purposes.

Mr. Ulvila commented that with the addition of the Health & Life Sciences building and the Clauson Center, along with the increase in enrollment in the nursing program, growth will occur and that the 10% forecasted growth is reasonable, but will need to be monitored. Ms. Beardmore added that the study did look at headcount totals for the five schools at the College to project headcount growth by school, which was then projected out to 10%.

Ms. Moore agreed with Mr. Ulvila’s comment on growth coming from expanding programs in the Health Sciences. Mr. Klasmeier added that future federal government legislation regarding tuition changes at community colleges may be an unknown factor not mentioned in the report and could also have an impact on enrollment.

Dr. Johnson responded that the report should be self-standing and not reliant on potential changes and that providing more data would strengthen it.

A roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Addendum to the 2016 Facilities Master Plan and authorized its submission to the Maryland Higher Education Commission and other appropriate state agencies.

4. Human Resources Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair

Mr. Ulvila reported that in lieu of meeting on May 26, 2021, the committee received a written report which provided an update on fall 2021 planning and collective bargaining. The report stated that more classes and services will be on campus in the fall in balance with remote classes and services. Mr. Ulvila stated that employees and students are not required to be vaccinated at this time and that the College continues to prepare for the passing of the Collective Bargaining bill which is anticipated to become law in September of 2022.

5. AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Lead Liaison

Mr. Ulvila read a thank you letter from a student for a scholarship and provided a fundraising update. As of May 15, 2021, the fundraising total for FY 21 is over $1.73 million in gifts and commitments with total campaign revenue over $9.71 million in gifts and commitments.

The groundbreaking for the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades was held on May 24, 2021. A recording of the program can be requested from Ms. Amanda Turner.

Mr. Melson presented a naming opportunity on request of the Murray Family. Cullen, Ailsa, Dee and Sandy Murray of Annapolis, Maryland have requested a space for naming in the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades. Mr. Melson shared that the Murrays have made significant financial commitments and contributions to the College and, as community leaders, have encouraged philanthropy and multigenerational giving within families. The space to be named is the reception area of the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades which includes the vestibule, office area and breakroom.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Darrah, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the naming of the reception area the Murray Family Reception Area in the Clauson Center for Innovation and Skilled Trades in honor of Cullen, Ailsa, Dee, and Sandra Murray.

6. Approval of the Board of Trustees Meeting Dates for 2021-2022 – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the public meeting dates for the Board of Trustees for 2021-2022.

B. No Reports for June

1. Audit & Finance Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair - No Report

2. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair - No Report

VI. President’s Report – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay

Dr. Lindsay shared that on May 27, 2021 the College celebrated its 59th annual commencement with Car-mencement, a car parade to celebrate over 400 graduates. Approximately 1,985 students graduated with 2, 381 degrees and certificates. Dr. Lindsay shared her appreciation for the Commencement Committee for their work and for the trustees who were able to join the celebration.

Dr. Lindsay provided an update on college searches. Finalists for the Provost/Vice President of Learning as well as for the Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer, have been invited to campus to meet with constituency groups and will do virtual open forums with faculty and staff. The College hopes to have both positions filled by August 1, 2021. Dr. Lindsay expressed her gratitude to everyone involved in the search processes.

Dr. Lindsay shared that the United States Maritime Administration has announced Anne Arundel Community College as one of the first Centers of Excellence, a designation given to 27 academic institutions preparing students for careers in the nation’s maritime industry. This presents an opportunity for the College to expand the credit programs in transportation and logistics, create a new noncredit program in marine services skilled trades and to develop partnerships in the county and region with boatyards, marinas and various apprenticeships. Dr. Lindsay acknowledged the work of Karen Cook, dean, School of Business & Law, for spearheading this effort.

Dr. Lindsay congratulated Vice President Beardmore and her team for receiving the Government Finance Officers Association award for best practices for community college budgeting for 2021.

Dr. Lindsay expressed her gratitude for Trustee Darrah for her leadership and dedication to the College and wished her well.

Dr. Lindsay also expressed her gratitude for student trustee Briana (Bri) Barone for her service with the Board and recognized her accomplishment in obtaining a national leadership position in the community college honor society of Phi Beta Kappa.

2.Foundation Update– Vollie Melson, Executive Director of Institutional Advancement and Foundation

Mr. Melson provided an update on the Fundraising Campaign and Strategic Plan. The Launching the Future campaign began in July 2017 with the goal to raise $8 million over four years to support expanding workforce programs, increase scholarship opportunities and enhance student support services. Mr. Melson reported that with a generous donor response, over $9.71 million in gifts and commitments have been received. The current campaign wraps up on June 30, 2021.

Mr. Melson stated the three-year AACC Foundation Strategic Plan will align with the College’s strategic plan. The Foundation Board is hoping to build on past successes and is working with GG+A consultants to identify goals and develop planning structures. The Foundation Strategic Plan will be presented in September 2021.

Ms. Moore commended Mr. Melson, the Foundation and the Foundation Board for the work done. Mr. Ulvila echoed Ms. Moore’s comments and congratulated Mr. Melson, as well.

3. Monthly Accreditation Report – Dr. Gregory Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee

Dr. Lindsay shared that Dr. Schrader is currently the interim Associate Vice President of Learning as well as chair of the steering committee.

Dr. Shrader reviewed the process ahead for the committee and it is expected that the Self Study Design will be completed by June 15, 2021. Following receipt of the final approval, the work teams will begin working on the Self Study Report in fall of 2021 including gathering evidence. Dr. Schrader reports that each team continues to be on schedule and the steering committee continues to receive professional development on the accreditation process.

5. Student Government Association (SGA) – Ryan Kim, President

Mr. Kim introduced Ben Nussbaumer as the new president of the Student Government Association. Mr. Kim thanked the Board for the continued support of all the students. Dr. Lindsay acknowledged Mr. Kim for his successes and wished him the best as he continues his studies.

6. Academic Forum/Council – Myra Dennis, Chair

Ms. Dennis thanked the trustees for their support of faculty and the Academic Forum and announced that the incoming chair of the Academic Forum is Dr. Candice Hill. Ms. Dennis referenced the report submitted to the Board and highlighted the work of the committees and the increase workload experienced over the past year.

Dr. Lindsay thanked Ms. Dennis for her leadership and her hard work.

7. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Rachelle Tannenbaum, President

Dr. Tannenbaum celebrated the work of the faculty and committees over the past year and highlighted several accomplishments as outlined in her presentation. Dr. Tannenbaum shared that through the work of The Faculty Organization committees, adjunct faculty will have representation on the Compensation Committee and in The Faculty Organization Senate; the Lecturer III rank will go into effect next year for adjunct faculty; a 5% compensation increase pool for faculty was recommended and supported by administration and the Board; the full-time faculty evaluation process will pilot a reflective narrative; and work was done with general counsel on changes to The Faculty Organization Charter and the College Manual.

Dr. Tannenbaum announced the next president of the Faculty Organization will be Dr. Nicole Williams and shared her thanks with the administration and the Board for their support.

Dr. Lindsay thanked Dr. Tannenbaum for her leadership.

8. Professional and Support Staff Organization (PSSO) – Anne Bashore, President

Ms. Bashore announced that she will continue as president of the Professional and Support Staff Organization along with secretary, Kimberly Hubert and that Pat Shoemaker will step in as vice president. She thanked Kaya Smith for her service as outdoing vice president.

Ms. Bashore reported that participation in PSSO increased 12% this past year, with approximately 160 members attending general assembly meetings, reflecting 37% total participation of 550 members.

Ms. Bashore shared her thanks with the Engagement Committee and John Wood for their meeting support, and thanked the Board for their ongoing support.

9. Administrative Staff Organization (ASO) – Dr. Danny Hoey, President

Dr. Hoey announced that the new slate of officers for the upcoming year will be Jill Bennett, President, Andrea Zamora, Vice President, Erin Reeder, Recorder and at-large members will be Dr. Angelo Thalassinidis, Sara Eger, Wendy Thomas and Duane Herr.

Dr. Hoey expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to serve as president of the Administrative Staff Organization as well as for the support of Dr. Lindsay and the Board.

Dr. Lindsay expressed her thanks to Dr. Hoey for his service to the College and wished him well.

10. Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay

Dr. Lindsay reported that Dr. Bernie Sandusky will be retiring from the Maryland Association of Community Colleges as of June 30 and that Dr. Brad Phillips, the current deputy executive director, will be the new executive director as of July 1, 2021.

The next Maryland Council of Community College Presidents will meet on Friday, June 18 and the annual retreat will be August 2 and 3 at Wor-Wic Community College. The next Maryland Association of Community Colleges board of directors meeting is scheduled for June 23, 2021.

Dr. Lindsay shared that Dr. DeRionne Pollard of Montgomery College will be leaving to be president of Nevada State College and Dr. Charlene Dukes, former retired president of Prince George’s Community College, will serve as the interim president.

Ms. Moore announced that Mr. Ulvila will continue as president of the Maryland Association of Community Colleges and thanked him for continuing in this role.

B. Action Items

1. Revisions to the College Manual – Dr. Dawn Lindsay

Dr. Lindsay asked the Board of Trustees to approve the revisions to the College Manual. Legal Counsel, AACC staff and the constituency groups have reviewed the College Manual and its revision process. As part of this review, it was determined that the constituency group charters and bylaws, Academic Forum charter, and Student Government Association constitution are operational and do not rise to the policy level that would require Board approval to amend or revise. The proposed revisions include removing those sections and have each organization adopt its own process for amendments and revisions to their respective charters, which may be approved by the respective organizations and the president and vice presidents.

Dr. Johnson asked about line 50 in the redline document where it refers to the statement “if legal counsel determines the revisions are substantive in nature”, that the President be included in that decision and that if it is determined to be substantive in nature, that it comes to the Board.

In addition, Dr. Johnson referred to lines 53 and 54 where it is states that the Special Assistant to the President or designee will prepare an agenda, it should state the President or designee will prepare the agenda.

Dr. Johnson added that regarding line 94 where it again states that legal counsel determines if it is substantive in nature that the President be included in that decision.

Dr. Lindsay replied that the text was written with the assumption that legal counsel reports to the President and that it will be made clear.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the revisions to the College Manual including the changes proposed by Dr. Johnson, was unanimously approved.

Dr. Lindsay concluded her report with an acknowledgement that this past year was difficult, and the accomplishments the College achieved were a result of the dedication and passion of the entire college work force.

Ms. Moore shared on behalf of the Board their admiration for Dr. Lindsay and the administration, and all that has been accomplished in the past year and a half.

Mr. Klasmeier asked if Board meetings should be scheduled for July and August and cancelled if not needed. Ms. Moore replied that this had not been considered previously but that this option will be considered and the Board informed.

Dr. Lindsay stated that there will be a late June meeting scheduled to discuss procurements to which Ms. Moore confirmed that this will be scheduled as a public meeting to vote on the Financial Exigency and Reduction in Force Policy and some possible procurement items.

VI. NEW BUSINESS

VII. NEXT BOARD MEETING

Ms. Moore advised that a special meeting of the Board will be scheduled for late June.

VIII. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 5:22 p.m.

A session of the Board of Trustees was held on June 3, 2021 at 4:00 p.m. via Zoom Video Conferencing. Pursuant to section 3-305(b)(1)(i) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code Section 3- 305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, Briana Barone, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., A. Joyce Price-Jones, Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr. and Dr. 10 Irene Zoppi Rodriguez. Dawn Lindsay was also present. The topic discussed was performance evaluation of the President. The meeting began at 4:08 p.m. Dr. Lindsay left the meeting at 4:34 p.m. and rejoined at 5:09 p.m. Jerome Klasmeier joined at 5:22 p.m. The meeting adjourned 5:28 p.m.

June 29, 2021, Board of Trustees Special Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Paula J. Darrah, J.D., Vice Chair; Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.; A. Joyce Price-Jones; Jerome W. Klasmeier; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Briana “Bri” Barone; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Absent: Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez

I. Call to Order and Approval of Agenda – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

The public session of the Board of Trustees was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4:00 p.m. The meeting was open to the public via Zoom Video Communications allowing attendees to hear and observe the public session. Ms. Moore informed participants the meeting was being recorded pursuant to state law.

By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Mr. Ulvila, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the June 29, 2021, Board of Trustees special session agenda.

II. Board Committee Reports

A. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Paula J. Darrah, Committee Chair

1. Financial Exigency and Reduction in Force Policy (Action Item)

Ms. Darrah stated that the Committee reviewed the Reduction in Force policy originally adopted by the Board on February 24, 1993.  The committee recommended updating the policy and renaming it to Financial Exigency and Reduction in Force Policy to clearly state the scope, purpose and definitions and to remove the procedures as the college has developed procedures to align with the revised policy. As stated previously by the committee, procedures should not be included in a Board policy. The policy had been reviewed by legal counsel, college staff and constituency groups.  If approved, the policy becomes effective June 29, 2021. 

Mr. Ulvila moved to approve the policy, which was seconded by Ms. Price-Jones.

Dr. Johnson asked why the effective was June 29, 2021 rather than July 1, 2021, the start of the fiscal year. Ms. Moore responded that the effective date is generally the date on which the Board approves the policy.

Ms. Price-Jones asked if the change was only the removal of the procedures from the policy.  Ms. Moore responded that the language of the policy was updated in addition to the removal of the procedures, which will exist separate from the policy.

Mr. Klasmeier asked if the updated policy remains as thorough as the language of the prior document and the procedures.  Ms. Parker shared that the updated procedures have been developed and are currently being vetted. The updated policy retains the Board’s authority while the procedures containing the instructions on doing the work have been removed. Items that are not institution wide have also been removed and a separate Personnel Actions Policy is being developed and will be vetted and brought to the Board in the fall.

Mr. Klasmeier asked if the committee outlined in the original policy would be duplicated in the new procedures. Ms. Parker replied it did remain and has been modified as to who will be members of that task force.

Ms. Darrah reminded the Board that some of the policies reviewed by the committee contained a large amount of procedural detail and the removal of that information left a much leaner policy.  Ms. Parker added that the intention was to take a consistent approach to ensure the same level of information in each policy.

A roll call was taken of trustees to determine their vote and the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Financial Exigency and Reduction in Force Policy effective June 29, 2021.

III. Consent Agenda – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

A. Approval of Award of Contract for the College’s Insurance Coverage

B. Approval of the Award of Contract for the Replacement of Athletic Field Turf

By motion of Ms. Barone, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the June 29, 2021, consent agenda:

  • Approval of Award of Contract for the College’s Insurance Coverage recommended by USI Insurance Services in an amount not to exceed $558,600
  • Approval of the Award of Contract for the Replacement of the Athletic Field Turf on the Siegert Stadium Field to AstroTurf Corporation, of Dalton, Georgia, in an amount not to exceed $697,586.

IV. President’s Report– Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Approval of the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) Cultural Diversity Report 2021

Dr. Lindsay stated that the College is required annually to submit a Cultural Diversity Report to the Maryland Higher Education Commission by September 1.  This year’s report asked the College to include its definition of diversity, highlight successful diversity initiatives, and a summary of the impact of COVID-19.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Price-Jones, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the 2021 Cultural Diversity Report to the Maryland Higher Education Commission to be submitted by September 1, 2021.

V. ADJOURNMENT

Ms. Moore advised that the next meeting of the Board will be September 14, 2021.

By motion of Ms. Barone, seconded by Mr. Klasmeier, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the closing of the open session to move into closed session.

The meeting was adjourned at 4:18 p.m.

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