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Below are the minutes from the 2022-2023 board of trustees public sessions.

Sept. 13, 2022, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Vice Chair; Dr. Nadine Chien; Conor Curran; Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.; A. Joyce Price-Jones; JaCina Stanton-Buttrom; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Absent: Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez

I. Call to Order

II. Roll Call and Approval of the Agenda, Sandra E. Moore, Chair

The Board Public Session was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4:00 p.m.

Ms. Moore asked for the roll call and approval of the agenda. By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Price-Jones and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the agenda.

III. Welcome and Introductions, Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore asked the current trustees to introduce themselves and introduced the new trustees, Dr. Nadine Chien and student trustee Conor Curran.

IV. Approval of 2022-2023 Full-Time Faculty Appointments

A. Approval of the 2022-2023 Full-Time Faculty Appointments (Action Item) – Dr. Tanya Millner, Provost/Vice President for Learning

Dr. Millner asked the Board to approve the full-time faculty and tenure-track and term appointments for 2022-2023, which include thirteen total new faculty members. Funding for the requested faculty appointments will come from the Division of Learning operating budget, which has been confirmed by the Business and Financial Resources Office that the fiscal year 2023 base budget and assumptions approved by the Board contain sufficient funding for the request.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Price-Jones and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the full-time faculty and tenure-track appointments.

B. Introduction of New Faculty – Dr. Tanya Millner, Provost/Vice President for Learning

Dr. Millner introduced the new faculty to the Board: Dr. Zoe Farquhar, Communications; Oksana Fisher, Business Administration; Dr. Christina Junker, Nursing; Melissa King, Nursing; Heidi McLean Frye, Medical Assisting; James Muscatello, Business Administration; Reham Okily, Medical Laboratory Technician; Tiffany Padgett, Mathematics; Jennifer Phipps, Nursing; Lindsay Roark, Medical Laboratory Technician; Jeffery Roberson, Architecture and Interior Design; Marandalynn Scholz, Nursing; and Dr. Edward Tucholski, Physics/Physical Science.

Ms. Moore welcomed the new faculty to the College.

V. Consent Agenda

Ms. Moore reviewed the process for the consent agenda with the trustees. The items within the consent agenda are shared with trustees in advance of the meeting and include procurement items thoroughly discussed and approved by the Facilities Committee. The purpose of the consent agenda is to provide a single agenda item at the board meeting containing items vetted and reviewed by trustees prior to the meeting. This allows the Board to move more quickly through the agenda.

Ms. Moore presented the consent agenda and asked if any item should be removed for discussion and voted on separately. No item was brought forward to be removed from the consent agenda. By motion of Ms. Price-Jones, seconded by Dr. Chien, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the consent agenda:

  • Approval of the minutes of the June 14, 2022 Board of Trustees Public Session;
  • Approval of the award of contract for the replacement of the monumental sign to The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company, of Baltimore, Maryland in an amount not to exceed $461,281; and
  • Approval of the award of contract for the Fire Alarm Fiber Network Upgrade to Johnson Controls, of Linthicum, Maryland in an amount not to exceed $437,092.

VI. Board Chair and Committee Reports

A. Reports for September

1. Board Chair Report – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore stated that there was no Board Chair Report for the month.

2. Audit & Finance Committee – Sandra E. Moore, Ex-Officio Committee Member

The committee met on August 30 to discuss the presentation from the auditors on the planned fiscal year 2022 audit; review of the committee’s roles and responsibilities as set forth in the committee charter; accounting procedures and regulatory updates; FY 2022 Financial Status Report; Other Post-Employment Benefits Trust; and future meetings.

Ms. Christina Bowman, principal from CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP presented an overview of the planned 2022 audit including scope of services and deliverables, audit plan and timing, responsibilities and identification of the responsible parties necessary to complete the audit, and update to regulations, auditing and accounting standards.

College staff provided updates on the implementation timeline for three new accounting standards from the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, and John Williams, the College’s information security director, presented an overview of the College’s information security and business continuity programs.

The committee discussed the FY2022 operating budget status report as of August 26, 2022 and received an update on the status of the Other Post-Employment Benefits Trust, which as of June 30, 2022, has approximately $18.2 million set aside for costs associated with retiree health benefits. It was also noted that, in July, the county made a nearly $3 million contribution to the trust on behalf of the college for fiscal year 2023. This is the third county-funded contribution to the trust and another major step forward in implementing a reoccurring funding strategy to address this liability going forward.

3. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore shared that Ms. Price-Jones has agreed to serve on the committee. With a background in policy, her contributions will be welcomed.

Ms. Moore stated that the committee had not met in person, however, it did communicate via email and approved the College’s request to draft a policy for student grievances. Currently, there are procedures for addressing student grievances, but there is not a Board policy. Once drafted and vetted through the policies and procedures process and reviewed by the committee, the policy for student grievances will be brought to the full Board for approval.

The College would like to begin drafting an interim transfer credit for prior learning policy required by law as of October 1. An interim policy will allow the College to meet the effective date as there will not be enough time to move it through the full vetting process. As outlined in the Policy on the Development of Policies and Procedures, the president may request a delegation of authority from the Board to create an interim policy, and this request is supported by the committee in order to be compliance with the law.

Ms. Moore requested and received consensus from the Board for the president to move forward with drafting and adopting the Interim Transfer Credit for Prior Learning Policy.

4. Board Development Committee – A. Joyce Price-Jones, Committee Chair

Ms. Price-Jones shared that Board members completed a self-assessment, which is one of the activities listed under the Board’s goals and objectives. The purpose of the self-assessment was for the Board members to reflect upon their individual performance during FY2022 in order to enhance performance and to strengthen the Board as well as their commitment. A few suggestions for enhancing board governance, which emerged from the assessment, will be addressed at the committee’s October meeting.

The committee also requested an anonymous Board Performance Assessment for 2022 from the president and her executive team in order to provide feedback and to strengthen accountability. This assessment was overall very positive. Questions regarding the monitoring of student success and the Board’s understanding of educational programs and services have been addressed with the creation of a new committee.

Ms. Price-Jones thanked Dr. Shuang Liu and Monica Rausa Williams for their help in developing the assessments, as well as the president, her executive team and the Board for their participation in the assessments.

Ms. Moore shared that a new ad-hoc committee of the Board has been identified based on Student Success and Achievement. A formal name will be chosen at its first meeting along with a charter.

5. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

Dr. Johnson stated that the committee met via Zoom on June 21 and September 8. At the June 21 meeting, the committee discussed the initial planning for the $2 million in restricted funding from the County for one-time compensation adjustments in FY 2023, which is in addition to the 5% compensation pool authorized by the Board, and will be distributed to employees in September.

At the September 8 meeting, the committee discussed the Academic Portfolio and Resource Review and Tenure Expansion assessment. Katie Hagan of rpk Group provided an overview of the work her firm will be doing and stated that the committee will receive regular updates and opportunities to provide feedback as the work progresses.

The committee discussed the FY2022 Operating Budget Status Report as of August 26 (the final report for FY2022, subject to final audit adjustments), which reflected a balanced budget and the College operating within existing resources and consistent with prior projections.

The first FY2023 operating budget projection was shared with the committee with very early results and projections showing a balanced budget with a slight decline in tuition and fee revenue. The committee will continue to monitor enrollment and expenditures.

Other updates included confirmation of the County’s contribution of $2.97 million to the Other Post-Employment Benefits Trust on behalf of the College; status of the State’s Community College Facilities Renewal Supplemental Funding program providing $937,500 in support of deferred maintenance projects within the FY2023 capital budget; and an update on coordination with the County to gain formal appropriation authorization from the County Council for this new State funding.

6. Facilities Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair

Mr. Ulvila reported that the committee met via Zoom on September 6 and discussed September procurements, future procurements and received an update on campus projects.

Mr. Ulvila announced that three of the trade contractors on the Health and Life Sciences building have received Building Congress & Exchange Craftsmanship awards; the building received the Northern Virginia chapter of the American Institute of Architects Award of Merit in the Institutional category at its 2022 Design Awards; and Whiting Turner, the project construction manager, is up for the Overall Building Award from Building Congress & Exchange to be announced in October. Mr. Ulvila added that the building also received Gold LEED certification.

The Committee received an updated on the renovation planning for the Florestano and Dragun buildings. The Florestano building’s first phase is the creation of the Learning Innovation Center, which is funded using college resources. The College anticipates bringing forward an agenda item to the Board at the January meeting for the Guaranteed Maximum Price on this project. The second phase of the project is to renovate the first through third floors, which will provide a one-stop shop for students. This phase will follow the standard state process and include funding from both the state and county. Design funds for the Dragun building renovation and addition will be available as of July 2023.

7. AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Lead Liaison

Mr. Curran shared a thank you letter from a student for a scholarship. Mr. Ulvila reported that the AACC Foundation Board has set a revenue goal of $2 million for FY2023, and that as of August 31, the Foundation’s fundraising total has exceeded $203,000 in gifts and commitments.
College leadership has identified three areas of focus for AACC Foundation fundraising efforts in FY 2023 which include: scholarships for the health sciences; scholarships for workforce development; and funding for diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives. Mr. Ulvila shared that the Foundation received a gift of $100,000 which was split between supporting scholarships in the health sciences ad purchasing welding equipment for the Clauson Center.

In the future, Foundation staff will participate in work groups across campus, focusing on how private scholarships can support enrollment and retention efforts. Foundation staff are also working with Dean Elizabeth Appel and her team on the Health and Life Sciences Building Open House on November 3 to combine it with a donor cultivation event.

Mr. Ulvila shared condolences on the passing of long-time AACC Board Trustee, Jerome Klasmeier who served on the Campaign Steering Committee and as Trustee Liaison to the Foundation Board.

Mr. Ulvila reminded the Board of the Joint Board Reception on September 28, at 6:00 p.m. and to RSVP to Monica Rausa Williams.

Ms. Moore also provided her condolences for the passing of Trustee Klasmeier.

B. No Reports for September

1. Human Resources Committee – JaCina Stanton-Buttrom, Committee Chair

VII. President’s Report – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay reported that this year’s Board meeting presentations will be brief and that materials for further reading are provided for the Board in advance in Diligent. In addition, a forward-facing attachment for the public, which will include the minutes and supporting documentation, will be made available. The Board packet will now also include monthly talking points for Trustees to help facilitate conversations about the work of the Board. Board requests will continue to be tracked to ensure the College follows-up. Also, in the Board packet is the AACC Workforce Dashboard, which provides an update on a monthly basis.

Regarding fall semester enrollment, Dr. Lindsay shared that enrollment is almost flat. As of Monday, September 12, enrollment is 2,730 full-time equivalent (FTE), down 0.8% from this time last year. An additional 39 FTE is needed to meet the College’s goal of 2,769 students on October 1. The Fall 2021 to Fall 2022 new student cohort retention rate is 63.1%, up from 55.3% at the same time last year.

Additional classes have been added at Arundel Mills and Glen Burnie locations, which have seen headcount increases of 489% and 813%, respectively, compared to last year. Dr. Lindsay congratulated the hard work of all faculty and staff involved that made this possible. In addition, Dr. Lindsay noted that students will be able to complete programs at the location where they started.

Dr. Lindsay stated that her monthly College Update to the Board will continue to include updates on the Academic Portfolio Review, Academic Resource Review and the Tenure Expansion Assessment as well as college accolades and announcements of upcoming events.

2. Monthly Update on Accreditation – Dr. Gregory Schrader, Steering Committee Chair

Dr. Schrader shared that the College is now in its final year of the accreditation process which began in 2018. Dr. Schrader thanked the Board for their feedback on the self-study report, which have been incorporated. The report will be submitted to Middle States around the middle of this semester. The Middle States visit to campus is scheduled for March 12 – 15, 2023.

Dr. Claudia Schrader, Middle States Site Visit Chair, is scheduled for a preliminary visit on October 11. She will meet with the Board and the College community to introduce herself, and gain an understanding of the College’s readiness for the reaccreditation process. Trustees will be provided talking points in preparation for this meeting.

Dr. Johnson added that the preliminary visit has three goals: introduce the team chair to the institution, the people and the environment; ensure that all self-study processes and documents will support a useful onsite evaluation; and to address practical preparation for the visit. Dr. Johnson reminded the Board that it has a responsibility in this process and directed trustees to the Diligent Board packet where they can find a revised presentation on the process. Also, the agenda for the October 11 preliminary visit has been updated. Dr. Johnson encourages trustees to familiarize themselves with these documents and to reach out to him with any questions.

3. Academic Forum/Council – Dr. Candice Hill, Chair

Dr. Hill shared that the first meeting of Academic Council will be on September 15 and that the bulk of the work of the Academic Council is done through its committees which have already begun to meet. The main focus of their work for the year will be on access and accessibility for students.

4. Administrative Staff Organization – Jill Bennett, President

Ms. Bennett stated that the first meeting of the Administrative Staff Organization (ASO) is scheduled for September 21. This year the ASO will be asking “How can we best support our team, faculty and students in this new hybrid work environment?” Ms. Bennett shared her positive experiences returning to campus and interacting with students, who are happy to be on campus.

5. Professional and Support Staff Organization – John Dayton, Vice President

Mr. Dayton stated that since July, the Professional and Support Staff Organization (PSSO) has been focused on developing its annual goals for FY 2023. The PSSO has developed a theme for the year, “Empathy Matters,” and hopes to help members deal with work and life changes post-pandemic. While assembly participation has been below expectations, the organization is actively ensuring that all sixteen-member areas are adequately represented

6. Student Government Association – Abigail Billovits-Hayes, President

Ms. Billovits-Hayes shared her long-term goals for the year which include: accessibility, ensuring all events are accessible to students of all abilities; creation of new clubs and organizations; and increasing involvement across campus. The SGA Involvement Fair was held today with a huge turnout and soon senators will be recruited to work with the SGA Executive Board. As budget season begins next month, the SGA is preparing and helping clubs with the development of their budgets.

7. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Nicole Williams, President

Dr. Williams reported that The Faculty Organization (TFO) met on September 8 when all standing and ad hoc committees presented their annual goals which will be voted on in October. Dr. Williams shared that a motion was presented by the Promotion and Tenure committee to create an ad hoc faculty led mentoring group which will be voted on in October. The next meeting of the TFO is its Convocation, scheduled for October 13.

8. Maryland Association of Community Colleges Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay reported that the Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Board of Directors met on June 23, virtually, and reviewed the MACC annual report and strategic plan, adopted the budget, and elected the slate of officers for the upcoming year.

Dr. Lindsay stated that the Maryland Council of Community Council Presidents (MCCCP) retreat was held August 1-2 and that Guy Guzzone, chair of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, along with Mohammed Choudhury, the State Superintendent of Schools attended and discussed the implementation of Blueprint for Maryland’s Future. The MACC Capital Prioritization List and affinity group reports were reviewed and the legislature initiatives for 2023 were discussed.

B. Action Items

1. Approval of the 2022 Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) Performance Accountability Report – Dr. Tanya Millner, Provost/Vice President for Learning

Dr. Lindsay provided a definition which the College uses for Diversity to the Board to help frame the discussion ahead.

Diversity includes all the ways in which people differ and it encompasses all the different characteristics that make one individual or group different from another, including but not limited to race, color, ethnicity, gender, sex, gender identity, age, national origin, religion, disability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, education, marital status, language, genetic information, military or veteran status and the physical appearance. It also involves different ideas, perspectives and values.

Dr. Lindsay stated that the annual Performance Accountability Report (PAR) comes before the Board for approval every September and is due to the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) by October 1.

Dr. Millner reminded the Board that the PAR report is a required report and includes a data summary along with a narrative report. Dr. Millner reviewed the components of the report and stated that the indicators are aligned to the goals of the 2017-2021 state plan for post-secondary education and the structure is defined by MHEC.

The data provided in the report include a series of student characteristics and 28 indicators and data requested can lag by a year or more. Last year, the College set the benchmarks for 2025. Institutions were asked to respond to two prompts: How has your institution used disaggregated data to identify equity issues in students’ educational opportunities and outcomes; and what is the biggest challenge your institution faces as it attempts to equitably meet the goals, objectives and performance measures in the 2017-2021 state plan for post-secondary education?

Dr. Millner reported that the state has not updated the state plan for post-secondary plan at this time, but any updates will be shared with the Board.

For the first prompt the College discussed its commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism and how the College uses disaggregated data. For the second prompt, the College reported that the pandemic continued to provide challenges over last year, and how it leveraged stimulus funding for student access and success.

Student characteristics continue to show that the majority of credit students are part-time and that the student population is becoming more diverse. The pandemic has affected enrollment numbers across the board. The Enrollment, Retention and Completion Council (ERCC) continues to work on strategies to address challenges highlighted by the data.

Positive trends were seen in the success data, including data for student persister rates when students are disaggregated by race. The College, through the work of the ERCC, continues to examine student experience and seek their feedback. AACC offers 11 credit academic programs in the Health Sciences that require external licensing and or certification upon completion, that have more than five candidates in the fiscal year. Three programs had 100% pass rates in FY21 and four had 90% or more. Programs that did not match these were first time pass rates amidst a pandemic, and for most programs, second time pass rates are closer to 100%. Also, the pass rate for most programs was higher than state and national rates during FY21.

While the College is above national pass rates, there remains much that can be done. While Covid made assessing skills difficult one-on-one, more student support is being offered. The opening of the Health and Life Sciences building and on-campus labs has made more time available to programs for practice. Test prep and review along with practice exams have also been added as well. Supplemental instruction, open labs, and test taking and study skills workshops have also been added.

Continued Education and Workforce Development programs enrollment were greatly affected by the pandemic due to a significant number of classes being offered through traditional face-to-face classes.

By motion of Dr. Johnson and seconded by Mr. Curran, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Anne Arundel Community College’s 2022 Performance Accountability Report for submission to the Maryland Higher Education Commission by October 1, 2022.

VIII. New Business

Ms. Moore shared that several trustees will be attending this year’s Association of Community College Trustees Leadership Congress, and that former Trustee Jerome Klasmeier will be recognized, in memoriam, at the meeting.

IX. Next Board Meeting – October 11, 2022

X. Vote to Close Meeting / Adjournment of Public Session

By motion of Mr. Ulvila and seconded by Ms. Price-Jones, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved closing the public session of the Board and to move into closed session for the purpose to discuss an investigation of possible criminal fraud against the College, to consult with staff consultants and other individuals regarding pending or potential litigation, and to consult with counsel to obtain legal advice on compliance issues.

The public session meeting adjourned at 5:02 p.m.

Oct. 11, 2022, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr.; Vice Chair; Dr. Nadine Chien; Conor Curran; Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.; A. Joyce Price-Jones; JaCina Stanton-Buttrom; Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. Call to Order

II. Roll Call and Approval of the Agenda, Sandra E. Moore, Chair

The Board Public Session was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4:00 p.m.

Ms. Moore asked for the roll call and approval of the agenda. By motion of Ms. Price-Jones, seconded by Ms. Stanton-Buttrom, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the agenda.

III. Welcome and Introductions, Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore commented that every trustee was present, together, and in-person, for the first time in more than two years. She thanked and welcomed all of the in-person attendees as well.

IV. Consent Agenda

Ms. Moore presented the Consent Agenda, which were the approval of the minutes. By motion Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Consent Agenda:

  • Approval of the Minutes of the September 13, 2022 Board of Trustees Closed Session; and
  • Approval of the Minutes of the September 13, 2022 Board of Trustees Public Session.

V. Board Chair and Committee Reports

A. Reports for October

1. Board Chair Report – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore shared that the Board met earlier in the day with Dr. Claudia Schrader for the preliminary site visit for the Middle States Accreditation, and that the new Student Achievement Committee met and had a robust discussion regarding what the committee should be named and the committee’s charter.

Ms. Moore thanked everyone who worked behind the scenes preparing for the preliminary site visit.

2. Board Development Committee – A. Joyce Price-Jones, Committee Chair

Ms. Price-Jones stated that the committee met on October 5, and reviewed the responses to the self-assessment surveys and discussed plans of action which include updating a document outlining roles and responsibilities; workshops; professional development; and a retreat.

The committee recommends as part of the Board’s 2022-2023 goals that trustees participate in diversity, equity and inclusion workshop in January 2023, and attend a workshop on healthy communication, which will help to deepen understanding of themselves and others.

The 2022-2023 Goal Completion Tracking form was approved by the Committee, which will be provided to all Board of Trustees Members to help track completion of goals. In an effort to welcome new Board of Trustees Members and reinforce expectations, the committee suggests a Board Retreat in August 2023.

3. Human Resources Committee – JaCina Stanton-Buttrom, Committee Chair

Ms. Stanton-Buttrom stated that the committee met on September 22 and discussed Employee Benefits Open Enrollment, new human resources systems, and new collective bargaining legislation.

Changes to college employee benefits, including rate increases and plan design, are determined by the County. For FY 2023 there are rate increases for health plans and decreases for both dental and vision. Open enrollment continues through October.

Human Resources has had two system updates to improve service to employees which include a partnership with Benelogic to automate employee benefits enrollment and management, and PageUp, a new applicant tracking system.

The committee also received an update on the College’s efforts to prepare for new collective bargaining legislation which became effective September 1.

4. Student Achievement Committee – Dr. Nadine Chien, Committee Chair

Dr. Chien stated the committee met via Zoom on September 21. As a result of the Board Assessment Survey, the Board has recommended a new ad hoc committee that focuses on understanding the educational programs and student services that affect student success and outcomes at the College. The committee discussed the committee charter, committee name and possible reports and topics to review for future meetings. The committee will be mindful to focus on policies related to student success and not the operations. The committee received a brief overview of academic affairs in the division of Learning and student affairs in the division of Learner Support Services. At the November 17 meeting, the name and charter will be finalized and the committee will discuss specific areas on which to receive updates from the College at future meetings.

5. AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Lead Liaison

Mr. Curran shared a student thank you letter for a scholarship. Mr. Ulvila provided a fundraising update, stating that as of September 30, 2022 the Foundation fundraising total is just over $1.2 million towards its fiscal year goal of $2 million.

The AACC Foundation Board met on September 28 where it accepted the Foundation’s fiscal year 2022 audited financial statements, and agreed to increase the threshold for establishing a new annual scholarship at AACC from $2,500 to $5,000. The $2,500 threshold has been in place for over 20 years and recent scholarships are mostly $5,000 or greater. This change is part of the overall strategy of building a privately funded scholarship program, which can provide timely support to perspective and current students. The AACC Foundation is working to strike an appropriate balance between customization of scholarship criteria and scalable scholarships that can be awarded efficiently when current and perspective students need them the most. The Foundation currently has five general scholarships that donors can fund with any gift amount.

The Foundation is hosting a donor engagement event on November 3, from 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. in the Health and Life Sciences Building to showcase how AACC is addressing the shortage of health care workers in the community. Dean Elizabeth Appel will be conducting tours of the building for guests. Trustees should have received an invitation in the mail. If there are any perspective donors who should be invited to the event, please contact Mr. Melson.

B. No Reports for October

1. Audit & Finance Committee – Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Committee Chair
2. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Sandra E. Moore, Committee Chair
3. Budget Committee, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair
4. Facilities Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair

VI. President’s Report – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay shared that it has been a busy semester and that there are many events and activities to come. The College hosted Dr. Claudia Schrader, Chair of the Middle States Commission on Higher Education Evaluation Team who visited the Arnold campus, and Arundel Mills and Glen Burnie locations. Dr. Lindsay thanked Dr. Greg Schrader, the members of the Steering Committee, and volunteers who helped plan and organize the event. Dr. Claudia Schrader was very complimentary of the work done by the College community.

The College will be hosting some high-profile events and speakers this month. Dr. Lindsay shared that Cónsul Rafael Laveaga, Chief of the Consular Section Embassy of Mexico in Washington, D.C., will be presenting a lecture for Hispanic Heritage Month, and AACC will be hosting the League for Innovation in the Community College Board meetings on October 19 and 20. All trustees, along with a guest, are invited to the dinner on October 19 at the Annapolis Yacht Club.

The AACC Open House will be October 20 on the Arnold campus. The College will also be hosting Dr. Mark Bedell, the new superintendent of Anne Arundel County Public Schools for a leadership event sponsored by Leadership Anne Arundel on October 26. She shared that she has met with Dr. Bedell and that he is very supportive of the College.

Dr. Lindsay stated that she, along with Chair Moore and Dr. Kellie McCants-Price, will be presenting at the Association of Community College Trustees Leadership Congress on October 26 – 29 on AACC’s Model Course Program, and its success in reducing equity gaps. Trustee Price-Jones will also be attending the conference.

Dr. Lindsay presented at the American Association of Community College Trustee’s Future Leaders Institute on the College’s strategic planning and equity efforts on October 7. Additional information may be found in the President’s written report on National Disability Awareness month, Coming Out Week activities, and information on a new pathway for students to obtain a doctorate of pharmacy with Howard University in six years.

2. Sabbatical Reports – Dr. Tanya Millner, Provost/Vice President for Learning

Dr. Garrett Brown has been a professor of English at the College since 2011. Dr. Brown provided a presentation on his sabbatical, which he focused on designing a 21st Century American Poetry course, reimagined Writers Reading @ AACC, and reimagined his existing poetry into a new manuscript. The result is the creation of a new course, English 285, Special Topics in 21st Century American Poetry, which will be offered in fall 2023. In reimagining and reinvigorating the Writers Reading @ AACC program, Dr. Brown increased the diversity of writers in terms of race/ethnicity as well as in terms of genres and areas of interest. Dr. Brown also completed a full-length manuscript of his work titled Zenith featuring new poems which engage with topics related to technology, media, video games and computer code, and reflect his anxiety and the fragility of being part of what has been going on in the world.

Dr. Chien commented how much she enjoyed his poem Sparrow, and asked Dr. Brown to speak more about it. Dr. Brown shared the inspiration behind the poem and the thoughts and exploration it embodies for him.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez shared her gratitude for the work Dr. Brown had completed, and acknowledged the difficulty it takes to create it, and how the sabbatical contributed to making it happen.

Dr. Jaclyn Gambone is a professor of Education at AACC, and her work focuses on critical thinking and engagement strategies for educators. Dr. Gambone’s sabbatical focused on schools that did not use letter grades, such as Montessori, Sudbury and Waldorf schools, to understand intrinsic motivation. The result was the creation of The Mastery Project at AACC, focused on mastery teaching to help teachers teach in such a way that builds intrinsic motivation and success in students. Dr. Gambone shared that a second cohort of The Mastery Project pilot program with AACC faculty will be starting soon, and believes that this work will create a shift in how the College thinks about the assessment process.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez thanked Dr. Gambone for her passion, compassion and the empathy she shows. Mr. Curran stated that as a student planning to become a Spanish teacher, he appreciates her passion and looks forward to taking her class in the spring.

In regards to The Mastery Project, Dr. Johnson asked that Dr. Gambone come back to the Board to share the results of the pilot program and implementation on a broader scale.

Ms. Moore congratulated Dr. Brown and Dr. Gambone on the impressive work completed during their sabbaticals, which encourages the Board to continue its support. Dr. Lindsay stated that two more sabbatical presentations will be shared at the November meeting.

3. Strategic Communications Update – Dan Baum, Executive Director, Strategic Communications

Mr. Baum shared an overview on Strategic Communications current efforts and provided a framework for newer trustees on how Strategic Communications are approached at the College. Strategic Communications, from the perspective of the strategic plan, is focused primarily on goal of Entry, when it comes to students through integrated marketing, by creating quick recognition and encouraging enrollment.

Strategic Communications generates its message through four means: Owned Media, creating in-house content in various forms of print and digital marketing; Shared Media such as Instagram, SnapChat and TikTok; Earned Media, such as the press, where others tell the College’s story; and Paid Media when advertising. The Redefine Yourself campaign tells student stories in their own voices through different media in order to engage students in different ways. Ongoing, important information is shared and different campaigns are launched seasonally. Website users are redirected to different website pages, and an Apply Now button is more prominently featured on the website, which has resulted in an increase in traffic to the application page. Micro, or Niche campaigns, are also used and direct users to specific webpages.

Through reallocation of funds to more digital media options, Strategic Communications has been able to increase exposure without increasing its budget. Digital platforms are able to provide granular usage data which allows the effectiveness and success of these efforts to be easily measured. Success is also measured through excellence as demonstrated by the awards received. Strategic Communications recently received national awards from the National Council for Marketing & Public Relations (NCMPR) Paragons and the University & College Design Association (UCDA), as well as seven district awards from NCMPR. Most importantly, success is measured through engagement. Website traffic has increased, as measured through clicks and visits to specific pages, as well as in applications of new students.

Mr. Ulvila congratulated the Strategic Communications department on its work and continued innovation.

Dr. Johnson asked if there was an opportunity to focus on continuing students considering the number of students lost between their first and second years. Mr. Baum shared that the student journey has many factors to be considered and agreed that there is an opportunity.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez noted that some students may be afraid to return to the classroom and emphasized the important role that faculty can play in helping students make the decision to take an in-person class. Mr. Baum agreed that showcasing faculty can help build student excitement and motivate them to enroll in in-person classes. Dr. Zoppi Rodriquez followed up, asking which social media site is number one, to which Mr. Baum responded that it varies by audience, however, the department is able to track the performance of different messaging by platform.

Dr. Chien asked for information on the demographics and how the department targets them. Mr. Baum stated that when purchasing media, the department will share a student profile with the company and that students under age 25 are the core demographic, though information on non-traditional students is also shared. The media company will then identify appropriate forms of advertising that hit the identified audiences and can provide data can be tracked and show performance by platform. The granularity of the data allows for ease of analysis and the ability to shift resources to increase traffic and results.

Dr. Chien asked, other than age, what other demographics are tracked, to which Mr. Baum added that race, income, and location within the county are tracked, as well as others in an effort to discern data as much as possible.

Ms. Moore inquired if the percentage of students lost following their first year who do not return for a second year, include students who come to AACC intending to earn a one-year certificate. Dr. Millner stated that the percentage does include these students and that the data is provided to identify the differing reasons for student departures.

4. Monthly Update on Accreditation – Dr. Gregory R. Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee

Dr. Millner, on behalf of Dr. Gregory Schrader, provided an update on the work of the Accreditation Committee. Dr. Claudia Schrader, Chair of the Middle States Site Team, visited AACC on October 11, for a preliminary visit in preparation for the March 2023 site visit.

Dr. Claudia Schrader has received the draft of the Self-Study Report and the Federal Compliance Report and will provide feedback to the Steering Committee which will be implemented before the final review. The final report will then be sent to the Middle States at the end of the semester.

With the help of Dr. Johnson, the Board has received background materials to help guide Trustees through the accreditation process. Dr. Johnson and Dr. Greg Schrader are available to answer any questions.

The Steering Committee looks forward to working with the Board as AACC prepares for the full team site-visit on March 12-15, 2023.

5. Academic Forum/Council – Dr. Candice Hill, Chair (NO REPORT)

6. Administrative Staff Organization – Jill Bennett, President

Ms. Bennett shared that at the first meeting of the year, Dr. Dorothy Parrish Harris was elected the new member at large. In addition, goals for the year were approved and reflect a commitment to more interactive conversations during ASO general body meetings and more informal gatherings. Ms. Bennett extended an invitation to a coffee and donuts gathering scheduled in Ludlum Hall on October 12, and at a gathering at The Point on November 10 between 4:30 and 6:00 p.m.

The Committee continues to encourage service on county-wide committees and participation in mentoring and coaching. Ms. Bennett shared that five of the seven ASO officers are certified life and leadership coaches, and that there will be a friendly challenge between the divisions for the percentage of ASO members participating in AACC’s Help Link program.

7. Professional and Support Staff Organization – John Dayton, President (NO REPORT)

8. Student Government Association – Abigail Billovits-Hayes, President

Ms. Billovits-Hayes shared that the SGA hosted a General Forum where all club leaders come to hear what the SGA is planning this semester, followed by a Q&A. Budget season is wrapping up and SGA elections for the fall are underway. Ms. Billovits -Haynes shared planned events for the semester, as well, and stated that the SGA participated in the initial site visit meetings with Dr. Claudia Schrader.

9. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Nicole Williams, President (NO REPORT)

10. Maryland Association of Community Colleges Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay shared that the Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Board of Directors will meet on October 25 and will be voting to approve the 2023 MACC Legislative Agenda. The MACC 10th Annual Summit, Bridging the Gap Maximizing Transfer for Students, will be Friday, November 4 at the Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville. This event is an opportunity for colleges to share best practices. Confirmed speakers include Senator, Sara Elfreth; Maryland Higher Education Commission Secretary of Education, James Fielder; and State Delegate, Jarod Solomon.

B. Action Items

1. Approval of the Draft 2023 Maryland Association of Community Colleges Legislative Agenda – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay asked the Board to approve the Draft 2023 MACC Legislative Agenda. The agenda includes items for legislative action at the state level on issues that affect the well-being of Maryland community colleges and the thousands of students they serve.

Dr. Johnson commented that under the Facilities Renewal Grant, in the third paragraph, the first sentence is unclear. It states that “Currently, the annual appropriation is capped at either 5 percent of the Community College Capital Grant Program not to exceed $500,000 . . .” and that the word “either” indicates a second option to “5 percent,” which is not included in the sentence. Perhaps the word “either” should not be included. Dr. Lindsay responded that she will share that with MACC for clarification, but that her understanding is that the intention was to state that each of the community colleges receive an award, instead of only the eight designated colleges.

By motion Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Ms. Price-Jones and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Draft 2023 Maryland Association of Community Colleges Legislative agenda with the provision that Dr. Lindsay share the Board’s comment about the Facilities Renewal Grant with MACC.

VII. New Business

VIII. Next Board Meeting – November 8, 2022

IX. Adjournment

The public session meeting adjourned at 5:06 p.m.

A closed session of the Board of Trustees was held on September 13, 2022. Pursuant to sections §3-305(b)(7), §3-305(b)(8), and §3-305(b)(12) of the Open Meetings Act, a vote was taken to close the meeting pursuant to the General Provisions Article of the Maryland Annotated Code Section 3-305(d)(2)(i)(ii). The following Board members were present and voted to close the session: Sandra E. Moore, Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Dr. Nadine Chien, Conor Curran, Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., A. Price-Jones, and JaCina Stanton-Buttrom. Dr. Dawn Lindsay, Melissa Beardmore, Dr. Rick Kralevich, Dr. Tanya Millner, Dr. Felicia Patterson, Erin Parker, Andrew Little (left at 5:34 p.m.) and Monica Rausa Williams and were present as well. Topics discussed included an investigation of possible criminal fraud against the College; legal advice on compliance issues; and consultation about pending or potential litigation. The meeting began at 5:12 p.m. and ended at 6:26 p.m.

Nov. 8, 2022, Board of Trustees Public Session Minutes

Members present: Sandra E. Moore, Chair; Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Vice Chair; Dr. Nadine Chien; Conor Curran; Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr.; A. Joyce Price-Jones; JaCina Stanton-Buttrom; Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez; and Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

I. Call to Order

II. Roll Call and Approval of the Agenda, Sandra E. Moore, Chair

The Board Public Session was called to order by Chair Sandra Moore at 4:00 p.m.

Ms. Moore asked for the roll call and approval of the agenda. By motion of Dr. Johnson, seconded by Ms. Price-Jones, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the agenda.

III. Welcome and Introductions, Sandra E. Moore, Chair

IV. Consent Agenda

Ms. Moore presented the Consent Agenda. By motion of Ms. Price-Jones, seconded by Dr. Chien, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved the Consent Agenda:

  • Approval of the minutes of the October 11, 2022 Board of Trustees Public Session; and
  • Approval of the 3-year renewal of the Destiny One software license subscription, maintenance and support, to Modern Campus, Inc., of Toronto, Canada, in an amount not to exceed $324,324.

V. Board Chair and Committee Reports

A. Reports for November

1. Board Chair Report – Sandra E. Moore, Chair

Ms. Moore shared that on October 26-29, 2022, she, Ms. Price-Jones, Dr. Lindsay and Dr. Kellie McCants-Price attended the Association of Community College Trustees Annual Leadership Congress in New York City. At the conference, Ms. Moore, Dr. Lindsay and Dr. McCants-Price presented on the College’s Model Course Initiative. The group attended multiple presentations and networking opportunities, and highlights of the sessions they attended were shared. Attending a national conference by a minimum of two trustees is one of the Board’s goals, which were revised in January 2022, so this satisfied this goal.

2. Audit & Finance Committee – Dr. Irene Zoppi Rodriguez, Committee Chair

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez stated that the Committee met on October 12 and at that meeting Ms. Christina Bowman, Principal, from CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP provided a presentation on the FY 2022 audit results. The auditors issued an unmodified or clean opinion with no findings, management advisory letter, material weaknesses, significant deficiencies, control deficiencies, or audit adjustments for the College’s financial statement and Federal Grants audit, also referred to as the single audit. Ms. Bowman stated that the auditors did not encounter any difficulties in the completion of their work, and that all documentation and reports were available upon request. Following Ms. Bowman’s presentation, the committee agreed to move forward with the finalization of the reports recommended for acceptance at this meeting.

In addition, the committee discussed the FY 2023 operating budget status report as of August 31, 2022, along with the anticipated annual results, noting the College is operating within existing resources. Ms. Beardmore noted that this report is updated throughout the year and has been reviewed with the Audit and Finance Committee, however, as the committee’s work is completed for the year, future reports will be provided to the Budget Committee.

By motion of Mr. Ulvila, seconded by Dr. Johnson, and a roll call taken of trustees to determine their vote, the Board of Trustees unanimously accepted the college’s FY 2022 financial statements audited by CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez congratulated the College, and Ms. Moore shared her congratulations as well, and noted the superior work by the College over the past twenty years.

3. Board Development Committee – A. Joyce Price-Jones, Committee Chair

Ms. Price-Jones stated that the committee met on November 1 and reviewed the Board’s current expectations information document and discussed activities for 2023.

The expectations document was revised and renamed as the Anne Arundel Community College Board of Trustees Member Information document, and has been included with the board materials. If approved, this document will be included in the New Trustees Orientation packet. Current board members will also be asked to review and sign this document.

The committee believes this document provides clear and transparent expectations for the role and service of Board Trustees. Discussion on this document is welcome and it will be brought forth as an action item at the December 13 board meeting for approval.

Additional items discussed at the meeting included training and activities for 2023. The committee recommends the following for the Board:

  • Participation in a 90-minute diversity, equity and inclusion training led by Dr. Kellie McCants-Price, interim Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer, after the January public session, and
  • Participation in an online communications training, which is one of the Board’s goals. The Committee is researching options and will provide additional information at a later date.

The committee recommends that the Board’s Annual Assessment be completed by Board members in May, and that the results be presented by the committee in June. The document will then be shared at an August 2023 retreat. This retreat is recommended by the committee along with Board participation in a DiSC Survey, an assessment tool designed to help improve teamwork, communication, and productivity. The retreat will be an opportunity to welcome new Board members, reinforce expectations, and to fulfill the Board’s goal for communications training.

4. Budget Committee – Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr., Committee Chair

Dr. Johnson stated that the committee met on November 3. A presentation was provided by Katie Hagan, principal, from rpk GROUP on the preliminary results of the Tenure Expansion Assessment project. Dr. Johnson stated that at the request of the Board Chair, the committee will receive regular updates, and provide feedback as the work progresses until such time as a recommendation is brought forward to the full Board.

Ms. Hagan provided an overview of the research completed to date including an overview of tenure in the United States, tenure trends over the last two decades in higher education and two-year public institutions, and a summary of the College’s current practices compared to the preliminary findings. Several options were presented along with rpk’s preliminary recommendation. The committee requested additional detailed data to help the Board in its decision-making process, specifically to help in determining best options to improve outcomes. Ms. Hagan will follow up with this additional information, as well as a listing of policies and practices that are anticipated to be impacted by the final decision.

The committee received an update on the FY 2023 financial status report as of September 30. Consistent with the last report, the current projection reflects a balanced budget with expenses within appropriation authority, expenditure savings from staffing changes, general recruitment delays due to current market conditions, management of position vacancies, and general reductions in spending, which more than offset revenue decline. Fall enrollment improved slightly since the August projections, with annual tuition and revenue projected to be below budget by approximately 1% or $350,000. It was noted that the College will continue to monitor enrollment and expenditures to ensure a balanced budget.

The committee reviewed and provided feedback on the FY 2024 preliminary guiding principles and base assumptions, which will guide the development of the College’s FY 2024 budget.

The committee will meet next on December 12.

5. Facilities Committee – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Committee Chair

Mr. Ulvila stated that the committee meeting scheduled for November 1 was canceled and that in lieu of the meeting, a written update was provided to the committee.

The committee was advised that the list of awards for the Health and Life Sciences Building continues to grow with six awards received in October, including the Overall Building Award from the Building, Congress & Exchange.

A draft of the procurement item being presented for approval at this meeting was provided to the committee along with an update on the renovation of the 4th floor of the Florestano building for the Learning Innovation Center, which continues to be on schedule and within budget. The construction manager, Whiting-Turner, will begin the Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) development by obtaining proposals from vendors and subcontractors, and the College will provide the GMP to the Board for approval in January 2023.

Mr. Ulvila stated that the design process for the Florestano building 1st through 3rd floors will begin in early 2023, and that the Dragun building renovation and addition will be the next project following the completion of the Florestano building.

6. AACC Foundation – Lawrence W. Ulvila, Jr., Lead Liaison

Mr. Curran shared a student thank you letter for a scholarship. Mr. Ulvila provided a fundraising update, stating the total is just over $1.45 million in gifts and commitments toward a fiscal year goal of $2 million.

Mr. Ulvila stated that the AACC Foundation received a $200,000 gift in support of nursing scholarships from an anonymous donor, and expressed gratitude for the gift.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez shared how much she enjoys the students’ letters, and how scholarships impacted their lives, and appreciates the work of the Foundation.

B. No Reports for November

1. Board Policy Oversight Committee – Sandra E. Moore, Committee Chair
2. Human Resources Committee, JaCina Stanton-Buttrom, Committee Chair
3. Student Achievement Committee – Dr. Nadine Chien, Committee Chair

VI. President’s Report – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

A. Information Items

1. College Updates – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

The College hosted the League for Innovation Fall Board meeting on October 19-20. Dr. Lindsay thanked Monica Rausa Williams and her team for their work in making this a success. The College had an Open House on October 20 with over 600 students, and thanked Dean Dr. Lance Bowen for his vision; it was the largest Open House the College hosted, and that for the first time, Anne Arundel County Public School system advertised the event.

The College hosted the new superintendent for Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Dr. Mark Bedell, on October 26 who shared his vision and who is interested in a strong relationship with the College. And on October 27, over 200 graduates received their GED at the Maryland High School Diploma Graduation Ceremony.

On November 2, the College hosted the principals of the Anne Arundel County Public School system for the President’s Opportunity Scholarship Program.

On November 3, Dr. Lindsay, along with Ms. Moore, Mr. Ulvila and Mr. Curran, attended the Good Scout Award Breakfast, honoring First Lady Yumi Hogan, who is a huge supporter and former art teacher at the College. Dr. Lindsay attended the Community Foundation Luncheon to honor Live! Casino Hotel of Maryland as they received the Corporate Philanthropist of the Year Award. The AACC Foundation held a donor engagement reception in conjunction with the AACC Open House. Dr. Lindsay thanked Dean Elizabeth Appel for her leadership and the faculty and staff who facilitated tours of the Health and Life Sciences building.

Dr. Lindsay congratulated the men’s and women’s soccer teams as they leave for New York for the 2022 NJCAA Division III Championships. Dr. Lindsay also shared that the Entrepreneurial Studies Institute’s AACC Hatchery was ranked the 15th largest incubator in the state by the Baltimore Business Journal, and, that the AACC RN program has again been ranked by RegisteredNursing.org as the #1 program in Maryland based upon current and historic NCLEX-RN pass rates.

Throughout November, the College has been recognizing the sacrifices and contributions of military families through a variety of visual displays, initiatives and events. The College will gather at its Veterans Memorial Garden for a Veterans Appreciation Ceremony on November 10. Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez, retired brigadier general, will speak at the ceremony. Dr. Lindsay expressed her gratitude to Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez for her participation.

2. Revisions to College Manual – Erin O. Parker, General Counsel

Ms. Parker presented an information item to approve the revisions to the College Manual. This item will be brought forward for approval at the December Board meeting. The Board is asked to approve revisions to section IV, V, VII and VIII of the College Manual. The provost/vice president for Learning has approved the interim procedures for full-time faculty performance evaluation, and the vice president for Learning Resources Management approved the interim procedure for staff and administrator evaluations to reflect the current processes for performance evaluations. As a result, the sections on performance evaluations and procedures need to be updated to remove conflicting information in the Full-Time and Tenure Track and Full-Time Term Contract Sections of the College Manual (sections IV and V), the Administrative Staff Organization Code (Section VII), and the Professional and Support Staff Organization Code (Section VIII). Additionally, language in all of these sections has been updated to be more inclusive and all gender references have been removed.

The proposed changes are by the administration and the College has followed the process for manual revisions as outlined in Section 1.4 of the College Manual.

The College has provided the constituency groups an extension to provide any comments and feedback by November 18 and should this result in any changes, the exhibits to this motion will be updated prior to the December Board meeting, highlighting any changes that were made.

3. Sabbatical Reports – Dr. Tanya Millner, Provost/Vice President for Learning

Dr. Lindsay shared the appreciation of the College for the Board’s support of sabbaticals, which are in the best interest of the faculty and students. Dr. Millner stated her appreciation for the ongoing support of sabbaticals by the Board as well.

Dr. Millner introduced Dr. Robert Hurd who has served as a faculty member since 2005 and whose instructional goals and objectives have included: adding a more diverse range of authors to literature courses; designing composition courses to address issues of social justice; learning more about best practices for accessibility in all courses; and, designing curriculum for all courses that represent oppressed and marginalized populations.

Through his sabbatical work, Dr. Hurd set out to investigate the mutual influence that written and spoken grammars of English exert on one another, and the role that dialect plays in that interchange. His purpose was to apply what he learned to make an antiracist intervention in gateway English courses which would address a specific way that structural racism manifests itself in the teaching of first year composition.

Dr. Hurd took up the mantel to solve a long-standing conundrum. On the one hand, teaching students standard American English will help them learn the language of success in academics and the job market, knowing that the standard is shaped by structural racism. On the other hand, not teaching students the standard will further disadvantage them.

Dr. Hurd used his time to gain critical insights about how language, standards and power intersect in higher education institutions, such as Anne Arundel Community College. In his presentation, Dr. Hurd shared how he examined the important intersection between public discourse and private language, and how his work will improve understanding of that intersection and its relationship to student engagement and success.

Mr. Curran thanked Dr. Hurd and shared a comment as a student taking English courses of the importance of talking about the different types of English being taught, as well as Spanish.

Dr. Johnson asked if Dr. Hurd had thought about incorporating some elements of his research in a diversity, equity and inclusion program or workshop to share the secret conversations that are happening and the importance of those with the control to understand that there are things being said that they don’t and need to understand. Dr. Hurd shared that over the summer at the Diversity Institute he shared a brief version and would like the opportunity to hold more workshops, as he believes he is not only teaching the student who attends, but that there is a ripple effect and those students teach others, as well.

Ms. Stanton-Buttrom shared that as a former AACC adjunct professor, she sees the topic as essential and expressed gratitude for Dr. Hurd’s work in this area. Dr. Chien asked if this work was published, to which Dr. Hurd stated that it has not been at this time.

Dr. Millner introduced Dr. Grace Sikorski, Professor of English who became a full-time professor at AACC in 2003. Since then, Dr. Sikorski has worked to develop expertise in contemporary literature and creative writing by studying scholarship, literary texts, the creative writing process and craft with special emphasis on contemporary creative arts, aesthetic and intellectual movements and the relationship between different modes of artistic production including fine arts, creative and analytical writing and the literature of ideas.

Dr. Sikorski has worked to design new courses in contemporary literature and creative writing that are informed by creative and critical pedagogies reflective of the diversity of a multicultural society and aligned with current QCAR standards. The purpose of Dr. Sikorski’s sabbatical was fourfold: discovery of new knowledge and skill related to creative writing; integration of knowledge between different fields of study; application of knowledge in the creation of a new novel; and development of curriculum teaching materials and pedagogical strategies.

Mr. Curran commented on the work the English Department is accomplishing with its DEIA goals and thanked Dr. Sikorski for her contributions.

Ms. Price-Jones congratulated Dr. Sikorski on her work and asked if she would share her understanding of Critical Race Theory. Dr. Sikorski shared how she applies Critical Race Theory in English 101 and 102. When teaching a novel such as Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, she guides students with leadership and language to provide a framework in which to discuss race as it is represented in the novel. She stated that the framework is less theoretical and more practical and invites conversation and discussion about central questions. Dr. Sikorski stated that when she thinks about Critical Race Theory, she focuses on the practical application for her students in order to meet them where they are, in order to bring them up to a more advanced conceptual level.

Dr. Chien asked Dr. Sikorski about her novel and requested if a copy of the Bodyguard could be given to the Board. Regarding her current novel, Dr. Sikorski described it as a ghost story, a historical drama which takes place after WWII between a mother and a daughter in England, who are each trying to figure out what peace means after war.

Dr. Johnson shared that these two sabbatical presentations represent the College moving to another level, that the College is seeing a return on its DEIA efforts over the past years, and that students are receiving the benefits.

Ms. Moore shared her congratulations as well.

4. Enrollment Report – Dr. Felicia Patterson, Vice President for Learner Support Services

Dr. Patterson presented the Fall Enrollment Report, noting that the data presented is as of October 1, and includes only credit enrollment.

The College experienced a decrease in headcount of 4.12%. The reported headcount of 10,192 reflects a decrease of 438 students from fall 2021. Fall FTE of 2,750 represents a decline of 60 FTE (student credit hours / 30 credits) over fall 2021. Fall headcount trends by new and returning students show that for fall 2022, there are 7,368 returning students, a decline of 6.5% or 513 students; and, 2,824 new students, an increase of 2.73% or 75 students, as compared to Fall 2021.

Looking at fall credit headcount trends by age, 11.5% of students for fall 2022 are under age 18, 27.2% are ages 18-19, 28.7% are ages 20-24, and 32.6% are ages 25 or over. Comparing full-time and part-time status, for fall 2022, full-time students make up 27.9% of enrollment and part-time students make up 72.1%.

Gender headcount comparisons for fall 2022 show that 39.6% of enrolled students are male and 60.4% are female. For fall 2022, 43.7% or 4,079 students identify as non-white. Breaking down fall headcount by race/ethnicity shows that for fall 2022, 51.5% of students identify as White, 17.6% as Black/African American, 14.8% as other or unknown, 11.3% as Hispanic/Latino, and 4.8% as Asian.

For fall 2022, 66.9%, or 6,816 students are taking at least one online course. Students taking at least one hybrid course in fall 2022 is 16.2% or 1,647.

For high school students dually enrolled at AACC there has been an increase in students enrolled in the Early College Access Program (ECAP). However, there was a decline in other dually enrolled students from 537 in fall 2021, to 227 in fall 2022. Dr. Patterson added that additional students have since enrolled in this other dual program, but these numbers were not captured in the data cutoff of October 1.

The College’s fall-to-fall retention rate did increase from 55% in fall 2021 to 61% in fall 2022. This calculation includes first time, full-time and part-time degree and certificate seeking students who attended in fall 2021 and returned in fall 2022.

Dr. Patterson shared a slide showing the zip code from which students are attending which reflected that enrollment is predominately from west, north and east counties, with fewer students enrolling from southern zip code areas.

Regarding the zip code data, Mr. Curran asked if a statewide distribution is also available for out-of-county enrollment, and regarding age trends, if there could be a further breakdown of ages 25 and over. Dr. Patterson confirmed that the data can be shared in both these areas.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez expressed gratitude for how accessible the data are provided and appreciation for the data on ethnicity, race and diversity. In addition, Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez expressed her interest in learning more about the Latino community and where they are coming from, stating that understanding in which zip codes different demographics come from can be helpful in developing a DEIA strategy for enrollment and allow a better understanding of socioeconomic status and other roadblocks to enrollment. Dr. Patterson stated that this can be accomplished and acknowledged the efforts of Planning, Research, and Institutional Assessment with this work.

Dr. Johnson inquired as to what the data means and what is learned from it. For example, does the location of the college campuses drive the higher enrollment numbers in zip codes in closer proximity to them? In addition, Dr. Johnson asked if there is a target for the draw rate, and is there a strategy for reaching it. Dr. Patterson stated that there are a lot of analysts of the data that helps when developing strategy, particularly regarding admissions.

Ms. Stanton-Buttrom asked for more information about the steady decrease in FTE numbers over time. Dr. Patterson noted that there are many causes, and that it is a national question. One thing AACC is looking at is a focus on continuing students, ensuring that students return to complete their education.

Dr. Chien asked if the College is trying to get back to where enrollment was 10 years ago, or is it accepting these trends. Dr. Patterson stated that while the College is not trying to get back to where it was, today’s environment and students have changed and the College is focused on how to move forward and meet the needs of today’s students. Dr. Lindsay agreed that the College is not going back and that this decline has continued over the past 11 years and represents a national trend for all colleges. The College, through its strategic planning, is focused on student engagement, completion and goal attainment while interweaving diversity and professional development throughout the work.

Ms. Moore shared her perspective of the positive changes the College and the board have seen since her time joining as a Trustee.

5. Strategic Plan Update – Monica Rausa Williams, Special Assistant to the President

i. Revisions to Engagement Matters II: Excellence through Innovation

Ms. Rausa Williams provided an update on the strategic plan, Engagement Matters II: Excellence through Innovation, beginning with a review of the three goals of the plan: entry and engagement; progress and growth; and retention and completion; and the four objectives: excellence; engagement; innovation and resources.

Ms. Rausa Williams stated that the College achieves its goals through its fourteen strategic activities, and its progress is measured through 40 key performance indicators (KPIs). A KPI interactive dashboard is available for staff and faculty to see updated data in detail. The annual Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) Performance Accountability Report, approved by the Board at its September meeting, also contains data the College reviews to track progress and benchmark. In addition, the new ad hoc Student Achievement Committee may want to review data on specific KPIs.

The goal of engagement and entry is to increase engagement with students, employees and the community. Dual enrollment, one of the KPIs, was included in the Dr. Patterson’s enrollment update along with the enrollment in online classes. Other KPIs include tracking the market share of first-time, full-time freshman, part-time freshman, and recent college bound public high school students.

The KPIs reflect actions at the unit and the department level to support the strategic plan. For example, admissions has increased opportunities for applicants to enroll by adding personal enrollment sessions, in addition to personal registration days, and the College has developed a more robust communications plan, including improved promotional materials for the Early College Access Program and adult learners, and promotional materials have been translated to Spanish. Also, the launch of a new simplified single scholarship application has resulted in a 35% increase in applications for the 2022 – 2023 academic year.

The goal of progress and growth is to increase progress and growth in the connection of students and employees. Some KPIs that measure this include credit enrollment and FTEs, licensure pass rates, and first-time students that earn 15 or more credits in a year and the percentage of first-time students that complete college level math and English in their first year.

In the previous strategic plan, Engagement Matters, Pathways to Completion, units and departments completely redesigned the student experience with intentional scaling of equity focused student success interventions including the essential work of reforming developmental education. The result was the implementation of a new system of placement measures and accelerated developmental pathways. However, just as these major reforms were gaining momentum, the pandemic hit, and all courses and services pivoted to online and remote. The College immediately focused on deploying hundreds of laptops and hotspots to students in need, and, further tutor and support services were embedded into online courses, including all math and English sections.

It is difficult to predict the long-term impacts of the pandemic, but these KPIs help the College monitor its progress. It is also important to note that Engagement Matters II has an intentional focus on employees. For each of these goals there are KPIs to help measure progress with faculty and staff, such as the number of employees enrolled in Professional Development Courses. This year, the College implemented a new DEIA training plan for all staff which includes having one DEIA professional goal for each employee.

For retention and completion, the goal is to increase the retention and completion for all students. The KPIs for this goal focus on retention rates and show the number of degrees and certificates and graduation rates. In support of current students, a major strategy of the Enrollment, Retention and Completion Council has been to create frictionless access points to services. As a result, units and departments will continue to identify and eliminate barriers to enrollment, persistence, and completion.

Ms. Rausa Williams commented on the excellent work being done by faculty and staff. There remains more work to do, opportunities for improvements, and equity gaps to be narrowed and eliminated. The strategic activities of the strategic plan help guide the unit and departmental work to help achieve our goals. The pandemic continues to disrupt the landscape of higher education and the College has had to adapt its delivery of instructional and student services and address new barriers for students, faculty, and staff, all while maintaining a focus on equity.

As a result of this dynamic environment, the president and vice presidents developed a list of priorities for the College that align with the strategic plan and for which the College is being intentional about emphasizing accessibility within its diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism work.

As continuous improvement is key to the strategic plan, the College is recommending revisions to the strategic activities in order to be more comprehensive and inclusive, which is the information item presented to the Board.

Further, to keep the momentum going, and to continue the great work the faculty and staff are doing to support students, the College is recommending that the plan be extended by one year, until June 30, 2025. These revisions were presented and endorsed by the College’s Strategic Planning Council, and these revisions will be brought back to Board for approval as an action item at the December 13 meeting.

Dr. Johnson asked, regarding exhibit 1, if the replacement of a bullet is an equivalent or enhancement or if it was simply replaced with a new item. Dr. Johnson stated that it would be helpful to have an explanation as to why a particular item was removed and why it was replaced with the new item. Ms. Rausa Williams stated that the rational for the changes is in place and will be presented to the Board.

Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez commented on the importance of the why when developing a strategy, and its role in predicting the need for how to prepare for tomorrow. In addition, Dr. Zoppi Rodriguez emphasized the importance of having faculty and staff that mirror the student population and attracting the best talent. Ms. Rausa Williams commented that the strategic plan is a living document, and as the College assesses its goals and objectives, the plan can be revised and be continuously improved.

6. Monthly Update on Accreditation – Dr. Gregory R. Schrader, Chair, Steering Committee

Dr. Gregory Schrader stated that Dr. Claudia Schrader, Middle States Visiting Team Chair, visited the College for the preliminary site visit in preparation for the accreditation visit in March. Dr. Claudia Schrader shared positive feedback and the visit went very well. The Steering Committee is currently implementing the changes recommended by Dr. Claudia Schrader and is on track to submit the final Self-Study report to Middle States by mid-December.

7. Academic Forum/Council – Dr. Candice Hill, Chair

Dr. Hill stated that the Academic Forum had its first meeting of the year on October 27, the first of three meetings for the year. The Academic Council meets monthly. At the October meeting, the Forum voted on the Chair’s goals for the year and approved committee goals with a focus on DEIA work and accessibility. Dr. Hill shared that additional members will be joining Academic Council, including two members from the division of Information and Instructional Technology, two students, and two adjunct members, which will bring more voices to the table.

Going forward, work will focus on eliminating tension points within the Academic Forum by ensuring clarity in processes, and responsibilities of committees and members of the forum, and that deliverables brought forward by the committees are being assessed, valued and used, and that communication is efficient.

Mr. Curran stated his appreciation for the opportunity for students to have a voice on the Academic Council.

8. Administrative Staff Organization – Jill Bennett, President (NO REPORT)

9. Professional and Support Staff Organization – John Dayton, President (NO REPORT)

10. Student Government Association – Abigail Billovits-Hayes, President

Ms. Billovits-Hayes shared that the SGA had a very successful event in collaboration with the Health and Wellness Center on safe alcohol consumption. In addition, the SGA held a leadership conference, Riverhawks Rise, on November 2 and 3.

The SGA has opened its meetings to students who are not members, so that they may express their concerns. Looking forward, Ms. Billovits-Hayes shared upcoming plans and that the General Forum will meet on December 2.

11. The Faculty Organization – Dr. Nicole Williams, President

Dr. Williams highlighted the work of the Adjunct Faculty Affairs Committee stating that there are over 700 adjuncts at the College. For adjunct faculty, the work can be isolating, and small details matter and help to ensure that they feel included.

Starting last year, the Adjunct Faculty Affairs Committee had the adjunct requirement for movement to Lecturer III of department or college service removed in order to make it more equitable.

A motion is under way regarding the promotion from Lecturer I to Lecturer II to ensure consideration of the work completed in the adjunct’s role as Lecturer I. This item will be offered as an information item at the TFO meeting, and then voted on.

Regarding access to resources for adjuncts, a list was compiled of resources throughout campus. Adjuncts were also provided a list of rooms for virtual teaching along with instructions on how to book rooms for student meetings.

Dr. Williams acknowledged Dr. Lindsay and Vice President Beardmore for helping to ensure adjunct were included in the distribution of stipends this year, as well.

Mr. Curran thanked Dr. Williams for the work in compiling the resource lists provided to adjunct faculty.

12. Maryland Association of Community Colleges Activities – Dr. Dawn Lindsay, President

Dr. Lindsay shared that the Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) Board of Directors met on October 25, and approved the 2023 MACC Legislative Agenda. Talking Points will be provided to Board Members which highlight the five key issues on the agenda.

On November 4, the annual MACC Summit was held at the Community College of Baltimore County. At the event, best practices were shared by Marcus Wright, AACC’s Director of Transfer, Articulation and Career Alignment, and Dr. Nicole Williams, professor and chair, human services and TFO president, who presented a session about Faculty Aligning Curriculum for a Successful Transfer.

Trustees were asked to save the date for the annual MACC Trustee Leadership Conference on January 23 at 3:00p.m. at the Governor Calvert House in Annapolis.

VII. New Business

VIII. Next Board Meeting – December 13, 2022

IX. Adjournment

The public session meeting adjourned at 5:46 p.m.

Past Public Sessions