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Learning community students and faculty member pose.
Take your required classes in a new and innovative way!

Learning Communities integrate two or more courses using a common theme. By connecting subjects through readings and assignments, understanding of the material is easier and learning is improved. Furthermore, you'll work with the same community of students in the linked classes, helping each other succeed and making friends along the way. To enroll, simply register for the specific courses and sections in the learning community. The courses will transfer and appear on your transcript just as they would if you took them separately.

Benefits of Learning Communities:

  • Reinforcement of content in both courses.
  • Opportunity to make friends and form strong bonds with fellow students.
  • Built-in support system.
  • Increased interaction with the faculty.
  • Courses offered at prime times.
  • Courses often offered back-to-back in the same room.

Spring 2022 Learning Communities

Business and Technology: How to be Successful in the Digital Age

This learning community will focus on how technology is used to augment business globally. Students will examine best practices and develop skills using various forms of technology for research, analysis and data processing.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Computing and Information Technology
(CTA-100/ CTA-100H-070)

TuTh
12:30-1:45 p.m. 

OL-SYNC

Kim Law

Introduction to Business
(BPA-111-070)

TuTh
2-3:15 p.m. 

OL-SYNC

Steve Berry

Fulfills the technology general education requirement: CTA-100

Kicking Ass to Find Inner Peace

How should one deal with conflict? Explore methods from both the Western and Eastern traditions that martial artists use to face conflict and find balance. How does a martial artist prevent conflict? How does the martial artist use internal and external weapons to end conflict? How does the martial artist show compassion in a conflict? These are some of the fascinating questions we will explore through the works of some of the greatest thinkers and philosophers in history.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 101 or ENG 101H or ENG 101A with a grade of C or better. 

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Introduction to Philosophy
(PHL-111-073

M
11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

OL-SYNC

Kevin Murphy 

Academic Writing and Research 2
(ENG-102/ ENG-102H-073

W
11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

OL-SYNC 

Dean Bowers

Fulfills General Education Requirements: PHL-111 (Arts & Humanities) and ENG-102 (English Composition)

Criminal Minds

This learning community will explore psychological and criminological concepts as a key to understanding the minds of criminals. Is crime a choice? What are the impacts of the prison experience and the juvenile justice system? Behavioral, cognitive, personality and social psychology theories will provide a framework for understanding and explaining various aspects of the criminal justice system, causes of crime and various types of crimes.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Introduction to Psychology
(PSY-111/ PSY-111H-374)

AMIL
TuTh
9:30-10:45 a.m. 

OL-SYNC

Tina Smith

Introduction to Criminal Justice
(CJS-111-374)

N/A

Online

Darian Senn-Carter

Fulfills general education requirement: PSY-111 and CJS-111 (Social and Behavioral Sciences)

We and They: The Color Line in America Today

Do Black lives matter? Am I Mexican enough? Are you a terrorist? Why do you keep calling me Jackie Chan? Where are you from? You’re mixed? Why are you so angry? Why should I feel guilty? Can we please stop talking about this? In 1900, W.E.B. DuBois asserted that “the problem of the 20th century is the problem of the color line.” Where do we stand today? Has anything changed? Explore race, ethnicity and other intersecting social identities such as class, gender and sexual orientation through a sociological lens by analyzing texts and engaging in a hands-on campuswide research activity about people’s thoughts, experiences, questions, frustrations and hopes about race and identity.

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG-101

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Academic Writing and Research 1 
(ENG-101/ ENG-101H-072

TuTh
9:30-10:45 a.m. 

F2F

Jaquelyn Lyman-Thomas 

Introduction to Sociology
(SOC-111/ SOC-111H-072

TuTh
11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

F2F 

Gina Finelli

Fulfills General Education Requirements: ENG-101 (English Composition) and SOC-111 (Social Sciences and Diversity)

WHO TELLS YOUR STORY: SPEAKING, WRITING AND REFLECTING ON THE BROADWAY MUSICAL “HAMILTON“

Focus on “Hamilton: An American Musical” (2015) composed by Lin-Manuel Miranda. Explore the musical’s current and relevant themes as we examine communication, English, history and the performing arts. The musical will serve as a springboard to explore texts used to create the play: a biography of Alexander Hamilton, historian Joanne Freeman’s scholarship on duels and historical documents penned during the era. The reading, researching and writing completed in the ENG-102 course will work as a foundation for speeches in COM-111.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG-101/ENG 101A or ENG-101H with a grade of C or better.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Academic Writing and Research 2 
(ENG-102/ ENG-102H-071

M
9:30-10:45 a.m. 

OL-SYNC

Shelley DeBlasis 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication 
(COM-111-071

M
11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

OL-SYNC 

Susan Kilgard

Fulfills General Education Requirements: ENG-102 (English Composition) and COM-111 (Arts and Humanities)

Questions?

We’re here to help.

Learning Communities

April Copes, Ph.D., director

410-777-2788

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