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Take your required classes in a new and innovative way!

Learning Communities integrate two or more courses using a common theme. By connecting subjects through readings and assignments, understanding of the material is easier and learning is improved. Furthermore, you'll work with the same community of students in the linked classes, helping each other succeed and making friends along the way. To enroll, simply register for the specific courses and sections in the learning community. The courses will transfer and appear on your transcript just as they would if you took them separately.

Benefits of Learning Communities:

  • Reinforcement of content in both courses.
  • Opportunity to make friends and form strong bonds with fellow students.
  • Built-in support system.
  • Increased interaction with the faculty.
  • Courses offered at prime times.
  • Courses often offered back-to-back in the same room.

Fall 2021 Learning Communities

SPEAKING OF HISTORY

Ambitious men have used powerful speeches to shape U.S. history since before the nation’s founding. Women, enslaved Africans, immigrants from Asia and the original residents of the land that is now the Americas also had much to say but struggled to find a receptive audience. In history class, explore the notable events of U.S. history through the late 19th century guided by a variety of voices, some familiar, some just recently acknowledged. In communications class, refine your public speaking skills by researching topics from your history class to present as speeches to your peers. Gain confidence as a presenter in a supportive environment and further your mastery of history while listening to your peers do the same.

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101/101A.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

U.S. History through Civil War
(HIS-211-073) 

Tu
9:30-10:45 a.m. 

OL-SYNC

Lester Brooks 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication
(COM-111-273) 

N/A 

OL

Susan Kilgard

General Education Requirement: HIS-211 (Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities) and COM-111 (Arts and Humanities)

Anatomy of a Monster

Explore a variety of psychological concepts and use that knowledge to enhance our study of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.” Discussion topics will include, but not be limited to, the definition of monstrosity, ethics and morality, language acquisition and cognitive development, trauma, freewill versus fate, the nature of evil, persecution and rejection, and a wide range of psychological disorders.

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Academic Writing and Research 1 
(ENG-101-072) 

MW
12:30-1:45 p.m. 

OL-SYNC

Donna Packer-Kinlaw 

Introduction to Psychology 
(PSY-111-072) 

MW
2-3:15 p.m. 

OL-SYNC 

Juli Murray

General Education Requirement: ENG-101 (English Composition) and PSY-111 (Social Sciences).

Just Us: Social Justice for a Just World

Is this the kind of society and world in which you want to live? Investigate, discuss and speak out about social justice issues you care about the most. Find out what activists are doing to address injustices in areas such as civil rights, criminal justice, the environment, foreign policy, immigration, labor unions, privacy rights, social class, women’s rights and more. Learn how to advocate for the principles you believe in and create a more just society. Learn how to let your voice be heard!

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101/101A.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Introduction to Sociology 
(SOC-111-077) 

Th
11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

Hybrid

John Lawton 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication 
(COM-111-077) 

Th
12:30-1:45 p.m. 

Hybrid 

April Copes

General Education Requirement: SOC-111 (Social Sciences and Diversity) and COM-111 (Arts and Humanities).

Kicking Ass to Find Inner Peace

How should one deal with conflict? Explore methods from both the Western and Eastern traditions that martial artists use to face conflict and find balance. How does a martial artist prevent conflict? How does the martial artist use internal and external weapons to end conflict? How does the martial artist show compassion in a conflict? These are some of the fascinating questions we will explore through the works of some of the greatest thinkers and philosophers in history.

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101/101A.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Introduction to Philosophy
(PHL-111-074) 

M
11-12:15 a.m. 

OL-SYNC

Kevin Murphy 

Academic Writing and Research 1 
(ENG-101-074) 

W
11-12:15 a.m. 

OL-SYNC 

Dean Bowers

General Education Requirement: PHL-111 (Arts & Humanities) and ENG-101 (English Composition).

LAST (W)RITES: DEALING, NOT DWELLING, WITH DEATH

Rites (and writing) surrounding death have allowed us space to grieve and to celebrate, to mourn and to move on. Build on the skills in writing and research you learned in English 101, but add your own voice, focusing on human encounters with death and memorializing, while establishing your skills as a speaker and presenter. Study social traditions and individual inventions for coping, texts and tributes, and local sites of interest while becoming a stronger orator. Using the magic of Zoom, you’ll meet your instructors (virtually) in local cemeteries where we Last (W)riters will dig down into our communication toolboxes to explore 6 feet under while safely 6 feet apart.

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101/101A.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Academic Writing and Research 2 
(ENG-102-076) 

TuTh
9:30-10:45 a.m. 

F2F

Candice Hill 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication 
(COM-111-276) 

N/A 

OL

Susan Kilgard

General Education Requirement: ENG-102 (English Composition) and COM-111 (Arts and Humanities).

LET’S SPEAK ABOUT THE SAME KIND OF DIFFERENT

How do your life experiences influence your perceptions of others? Do you naturally see the similarities, or do you notice the differences? Explore how symbolic interactions relate to blind spotting specific cultures and/or groups. Identify a group to represent with a call of action to fuel a change in their community. Gain a heightened sense of cultural awareness, interpersonal skills and small group dynamics. Crank up your communications skills with table topics, group panels, talk shows and individual speeches.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication
(COM-111-078) 

M
3:30-4:45 p.m. 

OL-SYNC

LaTanya Eggleston

Introduction to Sociology 
(SOC-111-078)

M
5-6:15 p.m. 

OL-SYNC

Charmaine Thomas

General Education Requirement: COM-111 (Arts and Humanities) and SOC-111 (Social Sciences and Diversity)

Our Body, Our Voice

Did you know your mindset about health influences your behavior? Your food choices will determine how you feel today, tomorrow and in the future. Explore your health and enhance your wellness while learning how to influence others to do the same. Students will learn about the dimensions of wellness and research current health topics to persuade an audience to make healthy lifestyle changes! Learn how to take care of yourself and use your voice to impact global wellness. This course is a step toward delivering effective messages, setting specific goals to gain self-confidence and creating a healthier you.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication
(COM-111-079)

Tu
9:30-10:45 a.m. 

OL-SYNC

LaTanya Eggleston

Components of Personal Fitness and Wellness 
(HEA-114-279) 

N/A 

OL

Duane Herr

General Education Requirement: COM-111 (Arts and Humanities) and HEA-114 (Wellness)

SCREEN TIME: LIVING IN AN ONLINE SOCIETY

How much of your life is lived online? In 2020, nearly all aspects of American society have a digital option: shopping, learning, dating, banking, navigating, stealing, job-searching, reading, keeping records of the past, photographing the present, dreaming of the future, even keeping in touch with our loved ones. How does this new reality affect a society? How do we determine our roles within it and live our best lives? Use sociological concepts and theories to examine how the internet has shaped our everyday lives. Consider the consequences of spending time in this virtual space. Research sociological topics based on your own interests while you demonstrate strategies for effectively speaking and writing about society’s constantly changing web of ideas.

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG-101.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication
(COM-111-271) 

N/A 

OL

Susan Kilgard

Introduction to Sociology 
(SOC-111-071)

TuTh
12:30-1:45 p.m. 

F2F

Gina Finelli

General Education Requirement: COM-111 (Arts and Humanities) and SOC-111 (Social Sciences and Diversity)

WE AND THEY: THE COLOR LINE IN AMERICA TODAY

Do Black lives matter? Am I Mexican enough? Are you a terrorist? Why do you keep calling me Jackie Chan? Where are you from? You’re mixed? Why are you so angry? Why should I feel guilty? Can we please stop talking about this? In 1900, W.E.B. DuBois asserted that “the problem of the 20th century is the problem of the color line.” Where do we stand today? Has anything changed? Explore race, ethnicity and other intersecting social identities such as class, gender and sexual orientation through a sociological lens by analyzing texts and engaging in a hands-on campuswide research activity about people’s thoughts, experiences, questions, frustrations and hopes about race and identity.

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG-101

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Academic Writing and Research 1 
(ENG-101-070) 

TuTh
9:30-10:45 a.m. 

F2F

Jaquelyn Lyman-Thomas 

Introduction to Sociology
(SOC-111-070) 

TuTh
11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

F2F 

Gina Finelli

General Education Requirement: ENG-101 (English Composition) and SOC-111 (Social Sciences and Diversity).

WHO TELLS YOUR STORY: SPEAKING, WRITING AND REFLECTING ON THE BROADWAY MUSICAL “HAMILTON“

Focus on “Hamilton: An American Musical” (2015) composed by Lin-Manuel Miranda. Explore the musical’s current and relevant themes as we examine communication, English, history and the performing arts. The musical will serve as a springboard to explore texts used to create the play: a biography of Alexander Hamilton, historian Joanne Freeman’s scholarship on duels, and historical documents penned during the era. The reading, researching and writing completed in the ENG-102 course will work as a foundation for speeches in COM-111.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG-101/ENG 101A or ENG-101H with a grade of C or better.

Course Days and Times Format Faculty 

Academic Writing and Research 2 
(ENG-102-075) 

MW
10-10:50 a.m. 

OL-SYNC

Shelley DeBlasis 

Fundamentals of Oral Communication 
(COM-111-075) 

MW
11-11:50 a.m. 

OL-SYNC 

Susan Kilgard

General Education Requirement: ENG-102 (English Composition) and COM-111 (Arts and Humanities).

Questions?

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Learning Communities

April Copes, Ph.D., director

410-777-2788

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